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English LingQ 2.0 Podcast, English LingQ 2.0 Podcast #7: Life in Japan, Part 2

English LingQ 2.0 Podcast #7: Life in Japan, Part 2

Hello everyone. And welcome to the English LingQ podcast with me Elle.

Remember it. If you want to study this video as a lesson on LingQ, the link will be in the description every time. Today I am joined again by LingQ member, LingQ team member, Eric, Eric. How's it going?

Eric: I'm good. How are you?

Elle: I'm good. Thank you.

Um, I wanted to chat with you again because the first time we chatted for this podcast, we talked about Japan.

Of course, we both lived there. You lived there for two years and I lived there for three. Uh, different places you were in Tokyo. I was in the North East of Japan. And we could have talked for a lot longer. Uh, I think we capped it at half an hour in that episode. And so I thought it'd be fun to chat again, share our experiences and give any advice for anyone who's interested in Japan, Japanese living there, visiting.

So at first though, I want to say happy new year. And, uh, I see that you have a very ambitious and inspiring Japanese language learning goal for 2021. TEll me about that.

Eric: Yeah.

So, uh, this is the year I make a breakthrough, I guess you could say. Um, no, but I just want to continue reading, but, um, yeah, I think last year I kind of went up a level, you could say, so now I'm reading more and this year I want to read even more.

So I kind of, uh, noticed the more I became,... uh, comfortable in reading Japanese, the more I want to read Japanese. Um, so this year, 10,000 words a week is my goal. And that's probably from my experience that's about one to two hours a day for reading. Um, generally speaking to put into context, like at NHK, easy news article.

Uh, those one of those is probably 150 words. So that'd be reading about, uh, maybe eight or nine of those articles a day, or in some other cases, depending on what book I'm reading, it's going to be like one chapter. Uh, so that's kinda like my, uh, goal. And then I'm starting read articles and novels and all this stuff.

So. Yeah, 10,000 words. By the end of this a year, I can speak Japanese and maybe in one of these upcoming videos. I don't know. We'll see.

Elle: Yeah. Wow. That is very cool. Very inspiring. I need to get on it with my French study. That's for sure. Um, so you, you mentioned novels, I'm just interested. Do you have any, so you have the NHK articles that, you know, for sure what you want to read over the year.

Are there any goals in terms of novels or other content?

Eric: Well, um, actually have this book, let me see. Okay.

So I have some stuff here.

Elle: Okay.

Eric: I went to library. So I got this, I got some movies. I got this one called Ramen Shop. Um, it's in Japanese. I find, I really want to get to the level where I can actually comprehend movies.

You Tubers and podcasters who are probably around the intermediate stage are okay because they know they have an audience such as myself. They speak slower. Movies are a little bit more difficult right now. Um, so I want to kind of get good at that. Um, I think that's less, less about reading, but a lot more about listening and watching dramas.

Um, I found this book too, um, that I thought was hilarious. It's called Making Out in Japanese. So this is an awesome book. It's just amazing. But, uh, it's actually, for some like, surprisingly, it helps with a lot of the everyday conversation. Um, like how does, how to say things in a very natural way. So I was surprised how actually helpful this book is, and it's not just about making out, there's like a small section about that, but, uh, there's a lot of things that I'm like, Oh, that's how you say this and that.

And there's a lot of material that you can't find online too easily. So this is another book. Um, those two, I want to get through like movies and books like that. Um, but in general yeah, just throwing myself into the Japanese ocean and swimming into the language, as you could say.

Excellent.

Elle: Well, best of luck with it.

I'm sure you will update us on, uh, on the forum and on the, this LingQ YouTube channel, your progress. We'll be interested to see that for sure. So let's talk more about Japan. I have been thinking since our last conversation about things we didn't mention. Things, I want to ask you, uh, things that people might find interesting who, um, haven't been there or lived there.

Um, one thing that came to mind was definitely earthquakes. So, uh, I am from the UK originally. I mean we do have earthquakes, I guess everywhere has earthquakes kind of, but I've never felt one. There'll be slight tremors in the UK every now and then, uh, of course you're from... you're from Vancouver and Canada.

So there are earthquakes here. Had you experienced any earthquakes in Canada before you went to Japan? And then did you experience any while you were in Japan?

Eric: Oh, um, good question. That's a common question. I think a lot of people talk about or ask when they go to Japan. Vancouver, a little bit, but not too much.

Oh, Japan, it was frequent. Um, yeah, it happened, I would say it happened more times living in Japan for a couple of years than it has in my entire life in Vancouver, small tremors and whatnot. Japan is a, I don't know what the reason why. Um, but they have quite a bit of earthquakes. Fortunately, they're not anything serious for the most part.

Thankfully Tokyo is, for some reason, always, uh, getting the smaller earthquakes and. Uh, things like that. So there are a couple of times where I was like, Oh man, is this building stay up or what's going on? What's going on here. But for the most part, yeah, you experience it. You get used to it. But I would see if you're in the countryside or in certain high risk areas, it can be a little bit more scary.

And I don't know exactly what those areas are because every year, and that's unfortunate, but every year I was there there was like a natural disaster in some small town in Japan. So that's something you have to kind of brace yourself. Thankfully with technology, you get kind of warned beforehand, like storms and stuff like that, landslides.

So in that sense, it's kind of a bit safe to be, uh, wherever you are, it's safe, but you just got to be prepared. Um, but yeah, no earthquakes are a thing in Japan. One of the culture shocks a little literal culture shock that's for sure.

Elle: And what was the, uh, was there a particularly big one you recall?

Eric: Um... you know what, not really.

I felt like the rain, the rain storms were worse. Like the rainstorms and... typhoon, definitely typhoons were harsher than my opinion. And I think. I think the one thing that actually caused the most trouble when I was in Tokyo was, uh, so I was there for almost three years, like two years and like just about three years.

But, um, every winter there was like one or two days of snow. It only snowed once or twice a year, but every time it snowed it shut down the city. And that I think caused the most havoc. That shutdown, trains, people couldn't get home. I was fortunate enough enough, I got home early one of those days.

Um, it was a pain to walk through the snow. It snowed quite a bit in Tokyo. And I had friends who didn't get home. It took them like five hours to get home instead of 20 minutes. Like, uh, yeah, it was the snow days, watch out for those. And I saw cars and people can't drive, in Japan, I think they're not used to these snow days.

The, you see the guys in the, well whoever's driving the cars, they're just spinning because none of them have snow tires.

Elle: No. And the cars are tiny in Japan too. Most, for the most part, they're like these little boxes. I...

Did you drive in Japan?

Eric: No, just the bike, like a bicycle, but nothing, no car. Uh, nothing like, no, nothing like that.

Elle: I had to drive for six months,

I think. My first school contract, I was in the middle of nowhere in like a small town and I worked in a high school in the town

across the way. And I had, so I needed a car and I drove a Suzuki Wagon and, uh, it was really cute, but it was literally like a box and not a very powerful engine. And I was in the Northeast, like I said, so there was snow, there was lots of snow, uh, when it snowed and, um, that was quite scary. I remember.

Yeah.

It's a long time to get to school a couple of times. Had some kind of hairy experiences.

Eric: I'm sure.

Elle: The ice. But uh, yeah, that's

probably, I guess it didn't really surprise me too much the size of the vehicles in, uh, In Japan, especially since now I live in North America. In Canada, they're huge trucks. They're like buses and yeah,

there's little dinky cars in Japan.

Eric: For sure.

Yeah, no, that's, that's, uh, especially in Tokyo where everything's so small and compact, it's a bit more convenient to have those, uh, boxes, little boxes, boxes with wheels.

Elle: Yeah, basically. Yeah.

So you mentioned there with um, the natural disasters, this the warning system, I found that quite helpful and also really stressful.

I was up in the Northeast of Japan when the big, um, tsunami and earthquake happened. And I remember the sound... did you have the app on your phone, the sound for, you know, earthquake coming.

Eric: Yeah, but I think, it might've went once or twice, but it wasn't... I don't even know why it went off. I think it was a test or something, but Oh, it might've been North Korea shooting missiles over Japan.

I don't know what the heck was going on that day, but it's just like what?

Elle: There's that whole thing too. Yeah, it's a crazy place.

Eric: So yeah. Anyone who was in Japan, you got to watch out for earthquakes, snow and missiles from North Korea.

Elle: Yeah. When I was there, I remember there was a, they did a test and some, one of the missiles landed in the sea of Sea of Japan, Sea of China.

And, um, yeah, it was a real, it was a real concern for a while when I was there. Yeah.

Eric: I was going to ask me, so how was your experience with, um, um, I guess it was the Fukushima natural disaster that the whole world saw. So you were in Japan. Where were you in Japan? Uh, where, where are you during that time?

And how was that like handled when you were there?

Elle: Um, it was,

I was living in Sendai at the time, which is basically the epicenter of the earthquake, but I was on a trip. I was in Nico the place with see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil monkeys. I was actually visiting that shrine, that building, and I was about to buy a ticket to get in and the earthquake started.

And I remember the woman behind the, at the ticket desk just like looked at her colleague and looked at me and just shut the window. Cause I was literally handing her my money to, to get tickets, to go up and see. Um, she didn't know what to do. And then, so we stood in the middle of this clearing and there was like a 3000 year old pagoda,

just creaking. Um, it wasn't, it wasn't as it was, it was big, people were screaming and it was quite alarming. We kind of huddled. I was with my husband, my now husband and our friend, we just kind of huddled and looked around, it's all we could do. And then, um, the whole... whole Journey after that. We couldn't get back to Sendai because, um, because everything was destroyed and, uh... not destroyed, but you know, it wasn't advised to go back up there anyway.

So we stayed down, we went down to Tokyo, we went down to Hiroshima. We went to Nagoya and stayed at our company headquarters there for a bit, and worked at the head office. Then we eventually got back to Sendai two weeks later, and it was... intense. Um, the schools, two of the schools that I worked at, one of them, the water from the, um, from the tsunami reached just across the road, but the place was just an absolute, like there was stuff everywhere, everything had fallen down and was broken.

And so, uh, and that the other school, we, my husband and I rode our bikes there. It was totally destroyed. Like the, everything was all over the place then broken down, but to the ceiling and right across was where the, um, the tsunami had reached. So we saw that and it was just awful. We rode through it actually to get to the school, to, to help clean up the school.

And it was, yeah, it was just awful, awful, awful, sad. Just like being, like riding through a movie set. Heartbreaking to, to think about what had happened there, Natori is the place, uh, just outside of Sendai. So, um, yeah, it was an awful, awful time. Um, we stayed and we helped out, uh, we were scrubbing oil off houses in, um, In, I can't remember the name of the area

now, just outside Sendai. There was an oil refinery and then the tsunami had brought in oil in the water. So people's houses were just covered in sludge. Um, uh, what else did we do? Oh, and then the most alarming thing. And then I'll stop talking about it cause it's, Oh, it's awful. I don't know how people live, honestly, with the threat of earthquakes cause it's a genuinely terrifying experience.

Uh, we were there in Sendai then for the, the big aftershock, which was, I think a five point something or six point something magnitude earthquake. Happened at 1:00 AM. So we were in bed and all of a sudden, you're fast asleep and all of a sudden just, of course, your world is shaking, shaking, so violently, um. We, all we could do is just jump out of bed and we kind of hunkered down by the side of the bed.

I thought I was going to die. That was for sure. I was like, this is it. Okay.

It's been great.

Eric: Geez. Yeah.

I can imagine that.

Elle: Shorter than I thought. But, um, but I, yeah, it was just terrifying. Terrifying.

Eric: Did you leave soon after that? Were you're just like, Oh, I got to go home or did you stay longer?

Elle: Um, we stayed for another, uh, until August.

So it happened in March. So yeah, We stayed until August.

Eric: Because so many foreigners left during that time I heard. Yeah.

Elle: They did. Yeah.

A lot of our friends, um, were bused out of Sendai. Well, there was like, there was no food, they were alone, a lot of them. They were teaching and living alone. So the, I think British embassy, American embassy, whichever countries, embassy sent up buses to bring people down to Tokyo.

And then they flew home. I may have done that if I had been alone, but I had my husband and we were from we all from different countries and, um, We didn't have our passports stupidly when we were on the trip to Nikko. So if we wanted to leave before going back to Sendai, we would only have been issued emergency passports for Canada and the UK, and we didn't want to do that.

So, um, yeah, we stayed. And also like Sendai was, our home had been our home for a couple of years up until that point. So we were really anxious to get back and see what was, what, what had happened, what it looked like and see if we could help in any way, see how kids, our students, you know, our fellow teachers, Japanese and, um, the, the foreign, uh, foreign teachers that were there.

So, yeah.

Eric: Wow. That's crazy. That's a... interesting experience to have, especially living abroad and, um, but you stuck it out. Um, um, that's impressive. Like that would be. For me, I guess, yeah, it depends if you're obviously in your situation. I know for me, my family would tell me to like, leave right away.

Elle: Yeah. Yeah exactly. There's no shame in, like, there was a bit of a, um, divide, I guess you could say, you know, the foreigners who stayed and the foreigners who just like deserted Japan. It's like, come on. There is, uh, an active that Fukushima nuclear plant, a whole other disturbing issue. Um, it's okay to want to, to want to go if you can, you know, um, But yeah, we, we were worried about Fukushima

of course, too. We were, there was a while where we were trying to, we were eating foods that were good for deflecting nuclear radiatio, anything like... okay, we won't eat food from Fukushima, of course. And lots of spinach or seaweed I think it was. Anyway, it was stressful.

Eric: Yeah.

Elle: Yeah. Anxiety-inducing time, for sure.

Um, I don't know what the situation is right now with Fukushima. I mean, I know the area, um, around Fukushima is still... not... nobody lives there, right? It's totally...

Eric: That's a good question. You know, there are people who still don't have homes I think, like a lot. Yeah.

So I don't know, but you don't hear much about it.

I think the Japanese media kind of throws it under the bus, meaning that hey don't talk about it too much. I don't know why that is, but, um, yeah, they just, uh, there are, there, there are lots of built like temporary housing. So I don't know how many people are in there, but there's, if you ever look on YouTube and you search for a few videos, people have gone through and documented, uh, what what's there, which is not much so.

Elle: Um, yeah, I've seen some videos of people who've gone in and, um, you know, you see that animals have reclaimed it, you know, there are packs of wild dogs and deer and everything's overgrown. I really feel for the people who. That's it, they left and they went ..Never able to go back. They couldn't have known that they would never, they would never be able to return to their homes.

It's terrible, terrible event, it really was. Um, anyway, let's talk about something more positive. Yeah, exactly. I wonder, um, what your favorite trip was while, cause you lived only in Tokyo, right, when you were in Japan?

Eric: Uh, yeah. Only in Tokyo.

Elle: And did you visit anywhere outside of Tokyo that you fell in love with?

There were so many amazing places to visit in Japan. Just spoiled for choice.

Eric: Yeah, that's true. I didn't go to too many places. I spent time outside, like I traveled around Tokyo so Nikko, um, Gunma, Saitama, but they're not really the most interesting places. I think like Gunma, for example, is just a very small

I guess countryside, uh, city, you can say countryside, city, um, just a very quiet place, but it does have, uh, a really good onsen. Um, I think the name is Setsu so, um, I think that's hwo you say it, Setsu onsen. And, um, Nikko has a lot of valleys and mountains for hiking, which was good. Saitama, Not so much, there's not much really to do there.

I think it's, it's more for people to live, to commute to Tokyo, but they don't want to be in the, in the city center.

Elle: Right? Yeah.

Eric: Um, I never have gone North. LIke the height, the farthest North I've ever been is Niigata and that's on the opposite side. Pretty much of Tokyo, but it's a little bit more North it's above Nagano.

And I've been to Nagano. Uh, one time then I also went to Osaka and Kobe. Kobe I liked a lot. Kobe's cool. It's like a, it's like a little Vancouver. Cause you get the, the water, you get the nice scenery.

Elle: Yeah, that's true, actually. And what did you think of a Osaka? What did you do there? I found that place.

I went to your in Golden Week, which is a holiday in Japan for anyone who doesn't know when everyone travels in Japan. And it was so packed full of people. I couldn't quite believe what I was seeing. It was tough. And I drove there. I was the driver, phew, do not recommend. Yeah.

What did you think of Osaka?

Eric: It was a pretty fun. I liked the people. Thy're more energetic. They have a bit more free time it seems than Tokyo, uh, people living in Tokyo. It's a little bit more, I think, rough in terms of the scenery, you get more small shops, food stands. People are just crowded around certain areas. Um, not as a, unlike Tokyo where it's kind of like everyone's in their own...

they go one path and everything's clean. Well, everything's clean, but still Osaka, I would say isn't a, like a Tokyo in that sense, but they, I think the people from Osaka have their own way of, uh, just approaching life. It's interesting. It's cool. Because they're more, I feel talkative. Um, so I found that was interesting.

Elle: Yeah. Could you tell, I know this, I know Osaka-ben, right?

Eric: Oh Kansai-ben?

Elle: Oh Kansai-ben, yeah I couldn't, I, my, I couldn't tell the difference. Um, when I went and listened to people talk. Could you tell the difference?

Eric: No, I can't. I can't really tell the difference. There's a... there's a few things now that I could hear, but it's, for me, it's difficult to pick up.

Um, For sure people who have studied the language a lot, who are fluent, they could probably tell. But for me, there's a few things. Um, just the way, especially with their verb endings, they say things a little differently. Um, but at the time, No I could not cannot tell. I just, I could tell they're from Osaka because of their personality.

Just, they're more outgoing.

Elle: Oh Interesting.

Huh. And, uh, did you pick up any new hobbies or learn anything new in terms of, uh, I don't know, sports or...

Eric: Oh yeah. So in Japan, um, like Mark, I played ice hockey. I played in, uh, the Tokyo S League it's called, so it's just a few teams. These are company teams. So I played for Marubeni and there is Densu,

there is, um, Uh, what's the car company that I'm thinking of? There's a couple of car companies like Mitsubishi. I think she has a company, um, and a few others. And we play, uh, we played game... we played games in Higashi Fushimi, is on the Keiō-sen and it's, it's, it's still in Tokyo, but it's going towards Saitama.

So it's kind of on the way to Saitama, but. Um, that's where we played our games and we practiced in Takadanobaba, which is where I was living. So it was great because I could walk to practice and to go to the game was easy because it was the same... uh, I lived in a station near station called Shimo-Ochiai , and that's the same line, Keiō-sen.

I could go to a game play a game easily. So I was, I lucked out when I moved to, near Takadanobaba, I wanted to play hockey and I found the practice... uh, practices were, uh, walking distance and the games were just a train train ride away. And I would just take my stuff. It's weird. Carrying your bag, like in Canada, you drive with your gear and stuff, but I, in Japan, I was carrying my, my hockey equipment, my sticks, trying not to hit people on the train.

Um, but it was fun. I mean, yeah. We had a fun team. We had a mix of foreigners and Japanese. I think most teams were Japanese players. Um, but, uh, it was cool. It was awesome. It was great a way to meet new people. Like I think that was one of the best things I did. I think if anyone goes to Japan or a different country, a hobby is a great thing to do.

And, uh, I, uh, yeah, I just happened to find hockey, which is not too easy to find in Japan. Um, and then we had tournaments games, met friends, uh, Yeah, no, I really enjoyed it. It was, uh, it was good. And one surprising thing about that is that adult league in Vancouver, there's not, it's not in contact cause you don't really need to hit just for fun.

But in Japan it was full on contact. So I haven't played contact in like eight, nine years. So it was a weird, like, it was like, what the heck? And like, I was like, okay, here you go. Like, this is. I gotta, I gotta keep my head up. Like, it was just funny that, that, uh, in Japan of all places, especially in a league, that's not professional, they had contact hockey.

And I thought that was interesting. It was fun. I was sore, but it was fun.

Elle: I'm surprised by that too. You'd think it would be the other way around. In Canada, I know. As I spoke with mock in aprevious episode, the violence is very much a part of the game, but Japan is a more reserved and...

Eric: Which is interesting yeah. Cause Mark played professional, which is hitting, but they're still reserved compared to yeah, compared to North America. Even the league I was playing in it, it wasn't too anything too crazy. Maybe a fight here and there, some players would fight once in a while, but. I have one story that I can share that was pretty funny, but...

Elle: yeah

Eric: like my players or whatever, they probably won't care. I don't even know who it was, but so in this league, um, because it's a rec league, you have to volunteer to ref a game. So they, they always picked two players from a team to ref another game. Another team's game. I didn't ref because I didn't speak Japanese and they're not going to choose me.

I don't have experience refereeing to. We had two players, who were doing ref. And by chance that... like the same night they had a party. So they went out to an izakaya and got very drunk. Let's just say like, just way too, too many drinks. And they actually ref this game, but they were, they couldn't even skate on the ice.

Yeah.

So there's a big, we had, we had a big talking to from like the league, um, Because apparently after you hand in the score sheet, they just drew obscene characters and like all these cryptic messages. I wish I was at that game would have been funny. But, um, that was like kind of a funny story.

Elle: Oh no.

Eric: Yeah.

I wasn't playing. It was just, it was two teams and two of our players who happened to ref, but I was laughing cause it was just a funny, funny story, like who goes to the game and refs can barely skate because they drank too much sake. One of those things only in Japan.

Elle: And do you still play hockey now here in Vancouver or...?

Eric: Yeah, I played last year having played this year, uh, waiting to, uh, the leagues I think are shut down at the moment. So I don't know. I don't know exactly if I'll be playing this year. We'll see.

I'd like to, I like to just actually just practice around, but, um, I think that some of the facilities are closed, unfortunately.

Elle: Yeah. Yeah.

I think a lot of things are on hold for a while, but yeah. Yep. We'll get back into them. Well, Eric, as usual, we could talk more and more and more about Japan. Maybe we'll do another episode, um, but let's call it a day there. Thank you so much. Pleasure as always. And yeah, really looking forward to your posts on this.

So 10,000 words of reading a week throughout 2021 in Japanese. Wow. Okay.

Good luck.

Eric: Thank you. Thank you.

Elle: Ganbatte!

Eric: Exactly. We'll be speaking one day. We'll be speaking. Well, you'll be learning French. So, um, yeah, maybe we'll have, we'll get Steve to interpret for us. You'll speak French. I'll speak Japanese.

Elle: I have to, one day I'll pick up the Japanese again.

I mean, I do love it when I'm studying French and when I try to speak French, I come out with Japanese all the time. I don't know how Steve speaks all the languages he does, but yeah, it's definitely the language that's on my mind. It's, it's at the forefront, uh, in front of French, you know, but I'm actively studying French.

So anyway, one day, one day for sure. Thanks. Okay.

Cheers Eric. Bye

Bye-bye.


English LingQ 2.0 Podcast #7: Life in Japan, Part 2

Hello everyone. And welcome to the English LingQ podcast with me Elle.

Remember it. If you want to study this video as a lesson on LingQ, the link will be in the description every time. Today I am joined again by LingQ member, LingQ team member, Eric, Eric. How's it going?

Eric: I'm good. How are you?

Elle: I'm good. Thank you.

Um, I wanted to chat with you again because the first time we chatted for this podcast, we talked about Japan.

Of course, we both lived there. You lived there for two years and I lived there for three. Uh, different places you were in Tokyo. I was in the North East of Japan. 私は日本の北東にいました。 And we could have talked for a lot longer. そして、私たちはもっと長く話をすることができたでしょう。 Uh, I think we capped it at half an hour in that episode. ええと、そのエピソードでは30分で上限を設けたと思います。 呃,我想我们在那一集中把它限制在半小时。 And so I thought it'd be fun to chat again, share our experiences and give any advice for anyone who's interested in Japan, Japanese living there, visiting. だから、またおしゃべりしたり、経験を共有したり、日本に興味のある人、そこに住んでいる日本人、訪問者にアドバイスをしたりするのは楽しいだろうと思いました。 因此,我认为再次聊天,分享我们的经验并为任何对日本感兴趣的人提供任何建议,日本人住在那里,访问会很有趣。

So at first though, I want to say happy new year. ですから、最初は明けましておめでとうございます。 所以首先,我想说新年快乐。 And, uh, I see that you have a very ambitious and inspiring Japanese language learning goal for 2021. そして、ええと、あなたは2021年の非常に野心的で刺激的な日本語学習の目標を持っていると思います。 而且,呃,我看到你有一个非常雄心勃勃且鼓舞人心的 2021 年日语学习目标。 TEll me about that.

Eric: Yeah.

So, uh, this is the year I make a breakthrough, I guess you could say. それで、ええと、今年は私が突破口を開く年です、私はあなたが言うことができると思います。 所以,呃,这是我取得突破的一年,我想你可以这么说。 Um, no, but I just want to continue reading, but, um, yeah, I think last year I kind of went up a level, you could say, so now I'm reading more and this year I want to read even more. 嗯,不,但我只是想继续阅读,但是,嗯,是的,我认为去年我有点提高了一个水平,你可以说,所以现在我阅读更多,今年我想阅读更多.

So I kind of, uh, noticed the more I became,... uh, comfortable in reading Japanese, the more I want to read Japanese. 所以我有点,呃,注意到我变得……呃,阅读日语很舒服,我越想读日语。 Um, so this year, 10,000 words a week is my goal. ええと、今年は週に1万語が私の目標です。 嗯,所以今年,每周10,000字是我的目标。 And that's probably from my experience that's about one to two hours a day for reading. そして、それはおそらく私の経験から、読書のために1日約1〜2時間です。 根据我的经验,这可能是每天大约一到两个小时的阅读时间。 Um, generally speaking to put into context, like at NHK, easy news article. ええと、一般的に言えば、NHKのように、簡単なニュース記事です。 嗯,一般来说,放在上下文中,比如在 NHK,简单的新闻文章。

Uh, those one of those is probably 150 words. 呃,其中一个可能是150个字。 So that'd be reading about, uh, maybe eight or nine of those articles a day, or in some other cases, depending on what book I'm reading, it's going to be like one chapter. 所以这将是阅读,呃,可能一天八九篇这样的文章,或者在其他一些情况下,取决于我正在阅读什么书,它会像一章一样。 Uh, so that's kinda like my, uh, goal. And then I'm starting read articles and novels and all this stuff.

So. Yeah, 10,000 words. By the end of this a year, I can speak Japanese and maybe in one of these upcoming videos. 今年の終わりまでに、私は日本語を話すことができ、おそらくこれらの今後のビデオの1つで話すことができます。 到今年年底,我可以说日语,也许在这些即将到来的视频中。 I don't know. We'll see.

Elle: Yeah. Wow. That is very cool. Very inspiring. I need to get on it with my French study. 私はフランス語の勉強をする必要があります。 That's for sure. それは確かだ。 Um, so you, you mentioned novels, I'm just interested. ええと、あなた、あなたは小説について言及しました、私はただ興味があります。 Do you have any, so you have the NHK articles that, you know, for sure what you want to read over the year. 何かありますか?それで、あなたが知っている、あなたが一年にわたって読みたいものを確かに持っているNHKの記事を持っています。

Are there any goals in terms of novels or other content? 小説やその他のコンテンツに関して何か目標はありますか?

Eric: Well, um, actually have this book, let me see. Okay.

So I have some stuff here.

Elle: Okay.

Eric: I went to library. So I got this, I got some movies. I got this one called Ramen Shop. ラーメン店というものを手に入れました。 Um, it's in Japanese. I find, I really want to get to the level where I can actually comprehend movies. 私は本当に映画を理解できるレベルに到達したいと思っています。

You Tubers and podcasters who are probably around the intermediate stage are okay because they know they have an audience such as myself. おそらく中間段階にいるあなたの塊茎やポッドキャスターは、私のような聴衆がいることを知っているので大丈夫です。 They speak slower. Movies are a little bit more difficult right now. Um, so I want to kind of get good at that. ええと、それでちょっと上手になりたいです。 Um, I think that's less, less about reading, but a lot more about listening and watching dramas. ええと、それは読書についてではなく、ドラマを聞いたり見たりすることについてはもっと多いと思います。

Um, I found this book too, um, that I thought was hilarious. ええと、私もこの本を見つけました、ええと、私は陽気だと思いました。 It's called Making Out in Japanese. 日本語で「メイキングアウト」と呼ばれています。 So this is an awesome book. だからこれは素晴らしい本です。 It's just amazing. But, uh, it's actually, for some like, surprisingly, it helps with a lot of the everyday conversation. しかし、ええと、それは実際には、驚くべきことに、それは日常会話の多くに役立ちます。 Um, like how does, how to say things in a very natural way. So I was surprised how actually helpful this book is, and it's not just about making out, there's like a small section about that, but, uh, there's a lot of things that I'm like, Oh, that's how you say this and that.

And there's a lot of material that you can't find online too easily. また、オンラインでは簡単に見つけることができない資料がたくさんあります。 So this is another book. Um, those two, I want to get through like movies and books like that. ええと、その2つ、私はそのような映画や本のようにやり遂げたいです。 Um, but in general yeah, just throwing myself into the Japanese ocean and swimming into the language, as you could say. ええと、でも一般的にはそうです、あなたが言うことができるように、ただ自分自身を日本の海に投げ込み、言語に泳ぎます。

Excellent.

Elle: Well, best of luck with it. エル:まあ、それで頑張ってください。

I'm sure you will update us on, uh, on the forum and on the, this LingQ YouTube channel, your progress. フォーラムやこのLingQYouTubeチャンネルで、進捗状況を更新していただけると思います。 We'll be interested to see that for sure. きっとそれを見たいと思います。 So let's talk more about Japan. I have been thinking since our last conversation about things we didn't mention. Things, I want to ask you, uh, things that people might find interesting who, um, haven't been there or lived there. 物事、ええと、人々が面白いと思うかもしれないこと、ええと、そこに行ったことがないか、そこに住んでいないことをお聞きしたいと思います。

Um, one thing that came to mind was definitely earthquakes. ええと、頭に浮かんだのは間違いなく地震でした。 So, uh, I am from the UK originally. だから、ええと、私はもともとイギリスから来ました。 I mean we do have earthquakes, I guess everywhere has earthquakes kind of, but I've never felt one. 地震はどこにでもあると思いますが、感じたことはありません。 There'll be slight tremors in the UK every now and then, uh, of course you're from... you're from Vancouver and Canada. 英国では時々わずかな震えがあります、ええと、もちろんあなたはバンクーバーとカナダから来ました。

So there are earthquakes here. ですから、ここには地震があります。 Had you experienced any earthquakes in Canada before you went to Japan? 日本に行く前にカナダで地震を経験したことがありますか? And then did you experience any while you were in Japan? そして、日本にいる間に何か経験したことはありますか?

Eric: Oh, um, good question. That's a common question. それはよくある質問です。 I think a lot of people talk about or ask when they go to Japan. Vancouver, a little bit, but not too much. バンクーバー、少しですが、多すぎません。

Oh, Japan, it was frequent. ああ、日本、それは頻繁でした。 Um, yeah, it happened, I would say it happened more times living in Japan for a couple of years than it has in my entire life in Vancouver, small tremors and whatnot. ええと、ええ、それは起こりました、私はそれがバンクーバーでの私の人生全体、小さな震えなどよりも数年間日本に住んでいたよりも多くの回数起こったと思います。 Japan is a, I don't know what the reason why. 日本は、理由はわかりません。 Um, but they have quite a bit of earthquakes. Fortunately, they're not anything serious for the most part. 幸いなことに、それらはほとんどの場合深刻なものではありません。

Thankfully Tokyo is, for some reason, always, uh, getting the smaller earthquakes and. ありがたいことに、東京は、何らかの理由で、いつも、ええと、小さな地震が発生しています。 Uh, things like that. ええと、そのようなもの。 So there are a couple of times where I was like, Oh man, is this building stay up or what's going on? それで、私がそうだったことが何度かあります、ああ、この建物は起きているのですか、それとも何が起こっているのですか? What's going on here. But for the most part, yeah, you experience it. You get used to it. But I would see if you're in the countryside or in certain high risk areas, it can be a little bit more scary.

And I don't know exactly what those areas are because every year, and that's unfortunate, but every year I was there there was like a natural disaster in some small town in Japan. So that's something you have to kind of brace yourself. だから、それはあなたが自分自身を支えなければならないものです。 Thankfully with technology, you get kind of warned beforehand, like storms and stuff like that, landslides.

So in that sense, it's kind of a bit safe to be, uh, wherever you are, it's safe, but you just got to be prepared. ですから、その意味では、どこにいても安全ですが、準備が必要です。 Um, but yeah, no earthquakes are a thing in Japan. ええと、でもそうです、日本では地震はありません。 One of the culture shocks a little literal culture shock that's for sure. カルチャーショックの1つは、確かに少し文字通りのカルチャーショックです。

Elle: And what was the, uh, was there a particularly big one you recall? エル:そして、ええと、あなたが覚えている特に大きなものは何でしたか?

Eric: Um... you know what, not really. エリック:ええと...あなたは何を知っていますか、実際にはそうではありません。

I felt like the rain, the rain storms were worse. 雨のように感じました、暴風雨はもっとひどいものでした。 Like the rainstorms and... typhoon, definitely  typhoons were harsher than my opinion. 暴風雨や...台風のように、間違いなく台風は私の意見よりも厳しいものでした。 And I think. I think the one thing that actually caused the most trouble when I was in Tokyo was, uh, so I was there for almost three years, like two years and like just about three years.

But, um, every winter there was like one or two days of snow. しかし、ええと、毎年冬には1日か2日の雪がありました。 It only snowed once or twice a year, but every time it snowed it shut down the city. 年に1、2回しか雪が降らなかったが、雪が降るたびに街は閉鎖された。 And that I think caused the most havoc. そして、私はそれが最も大混乱を引き起こしたと思います。 That shutdown, trains, people couldn't get home. そのシャットダウン、電車、人々は家に帰ることができませんでした。 I was fortunate enough enough, I got home early one of those days. 幸運なことに、あの頃早く家に帰りました。

Um, it was a pain to walk through the snow. ええと、雪の中を歩くのは苦痛でした。 It snowed quite a bit in Tokyo. 東京はかなり雪が降った。 And I had friends who didn't get home. It took them like five hours to get home instead of 20 minutes. Like, uh, yeah, it was the snow days, watch out for those. ええと、ええ、それは雪の日でした、それらに気をつけてください。 And I saw cars and people can't drive, in Japan, I think they're not used to these snow days. そして、車や人が運転できないのを見ました。日本では、この雪の日には慣れていないと思います。

The, you see the guys in the, well whoever's driving the cars, they're just spinning because none of them have snow tires. 車を運転している人は誰でも、スノータイヤを持っていないので、彼らはただ回転しているだけです。

Elle: No. And the cars are tiny in Japan too. Most, for the most part, they're like these little boxes. ほとんどの場合、それらはこれらの小さな箱のようなものです。 I...

Did you drive in Japan?

Eric: No, just the bike, like a bicycle, but nothing, no car. エリック:いいえ、自転車のように自転車だけですが、車はありません。 Uh, nothing like, no, nothing like that. ええと、そのようなものはありません、いや、そのようなものはありません。

Elle: I had to drive for six months, エル:私は6か月間運転しなければなりませんでした、

I think. My first school contract, I was in the middle of nowhere in like a small town and I worked in a high school in the town 私の最初の学校契約は、小さな町のようにどこにも行かず、町の高校で働いていました

across the way. 途中で。 And I had, so I needed a car and I drove a Suzuki Wagon and, uh, it was really cute, but it was literally like a box and not a very powerful engine. And I was in the Northeast, like I said, so there was snow, there was lots of snow, uh, when it snowed and, um, that was quite scary. I remember.

Yeah.

It's a long time to get to school a couple of times. 何度か学校に行くのは長い時間です。 Had some kind of hairy experiences.

Eric: I'm sure. エリック:きっと。

Elle: The ice. But uh, yeah, that's

probably, I guess it didn't really surprise me too much the size of the vehicles in, uh, In Japan, especially since now I live in North America. たぶん、日本では、特に今から北米に住んでいるので、車のサイズはそれほど驚くことではなかったと思います。 In Canada, they're huge trucks. カナダでは、彼らは巨大なトラックです。 They're like buses and yeah, 彼らはバスのようなもので、ええ、

there's little dinky cars in Japan. er zijn kleine dinky auto's in Japan.

Eric: For sure. エリック:確かに。

Yeah, no, that's, that's, uh, especially in Tokyo where everything's so small and compact, it's a bit more convenient to have those, uh, boxes, little boxes, boxes with wheels. ええ、いや、それは、ええと、特にすべてがとても小さくてコンパクトな東京では、ええと、箱、小さな箱、車輪付きの箱を持っている方が少し便利です。

Elle: Yeah, basically. Yeah.

So you mentioned there with um, the natural disasters, this the warning system, I found that quite helpful and also really stressful. それで、あなたはそこで自然災害、これは警報システムについて言及しました、私はそれが非常に役に立ちそしてまた本当にストレスが多いことを発見しました。

I was up in the Northeast of Japan when the big, um, tsunami and earthquake happened. 大きな津波と地震が起こったとき、私は日本の北東部にいました。 And I remember the sound... did you have the app on your phone, the sound for, you know, earthquake coming. そして、私はその音を覚えています...あなたはあなたの電話にアプリを持っていましたか、あなたが知っている、地震が来るための音。

Eric: Yeah, but I think, it might've went once or twice, but it wasn't... I don't even know why it went off. エリック:ええ、でも、1、2回は行ったかもしれませんが、そうではありませんでした...なぜ消えたのかさえわかりません。 I think it was a test or something, but Oh, it might've been North Korea shooting missiles over Japan. 試練か何かだったと思いますが、ああ、北朝鮮が日本にミサイルを発射したのかもしれません。

I don't know what the heck was going on that day, but it's just like what? その日は一体何が起こっていたのかわかりませんが、それはどういうことですか?

Elle: There's that whole thing too. エル:それも全部あります。 Yeah, it's a crazy place. ええ、それはクレイジーな場所です。

Eric: So yeah. Anyone who was in Japan, you got to watch out for earthquakes, snow and missiles from North Korea. 日本にいた人は誰でも、北朝鮮からの地震、雪、ミサイルに気をつけなければなりませんでした。

Elle: Yeah. When I was there, I remember there was a, they did a test and some, one of the missiles landed in the sea of Sea of Japan, Sea of China. 私がそこにいたとき、彼らがテストを行い、ミサイルの1つが日本海、中国の海に着陸したことを覚えています。

And, um, yeah, it was a real, it was a real concern for a while when I was there. Yeah.

Eric: I was going to ask me, so how was your experience with, um, um, I guess it was the Fukushima natural  disaster that the whole world saw. エリック:私に聞いてみたのですが、あなたの経験はどうでしたか、ええと、ええと、全世界が見たのは福島の自然災害だったと思います。 So you were in Japan. Where were you in Japan? Uh, where, where are you during that time?

And how was that like handled when you were there?

Elle: Um, it was,

I was living in Sendai at the time, which is basically the epicenter of the earthquake, but I was on a trip. 地震の震源地である仙台に住んでいましたが、旅行中です。 I was in Nico the place with see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil monkeys. 私はニコにいて、悪を見たり、聞いたり、悪猿を話したりすることはありませんでした。 我在尼科(Nico)那里没有邪恶,没有邪恶,没有邪恶的猴子。 I was actually visiting that shrine, that building, and I was about to buy a ticket to get in and the earthquake started.

And I remember the woman behind the, at the ticket desk just like looked at her colleague and looked at me and just shut the window. そして、後ろの女性が、ちょうど彼女の同僚を見て、私を見て、ちょうど窓を閉めたように、チケットデスクで覚えています。 Cause I was literally handing her my money to, to get tickets, to go up and see. なぜなら私は文字通り彼女に私のお金を渡して、チケットを手に入れ、上がって見に行っていたからです。 Um, she didn't know what to do. ええと、彼女は何をすべきかわからなかった。 And then, so we stood in the middle of this clearing and there was like a 3000 year old pagoda, そして、このクリアリングの真ん中に立って、3000年前の塔のようでした。

just creaking. きしむだけ。 Um, it wasn't, it wasn't as it was, it was big, people were screaming and it was quite alarming. ええと、そうではありませんでした、そうではありませんでした、それは大きく、人々は叫んでいて、それは非常に憂慮すべきでした。 We kind of huddled. 私たちはちょっと群がった。 I was with my husband, my now husband and our friend, we just kind of huddled and looked around, it's all we could do. 私は夫、今の夫、そして友人と一緒にいました。私たちはただ群がって周りを見回しました。それが私たちにできることのすべてです。 And then, um, the whole... whole Journey after that. そして、ええと、全体...その後の全体の旅。 We couldn't get back to Sendai because, um, because everything was destroyed and, uh... not destroyed, but you know, it wasn't advised to go back up there anyway. 仙台に戻ることができなかったのは、すべてが破壊されたため、そして、ええと...破壊されなかったからですが、とにかくそこに戻ることはお勧めできませんでした。

So we stayed down, we went down to Tokyo, we went down to Hiroshima. それで私たちは滞在し、東京に行き、広島に行きました。 We went to Nagoya and stayed at our company headquarters there for a bit, and worked at the head office. 名古屋に行って本社に少し滞在し、本社で働きました。 Then we eventually got back to Sendai two weeks later, and it was... intense. それから2週間後に仙台に戻りましたが…強烈でした。 Um, the schools, two of the schools that I worked at, one of them, the water from the, um, from the tsunami reached just across the road, but the place was just an absolute, like there was stuff everywhere, everything had fallen down and was broken. ええと、学校、私が働いていた2つの学校、そのうちの1つ、津波からの水が道路の真向かいに届きましたが、場所は絶対的なものでした。倒れて壊れた。

And so, uh, and that the other school, we, my husband and I rode our bikes there. それで、ええと、そして他の学校、私たち、私の夫と私はそこで自転車に乗りました。 It was totally destroyed. それは完全に破壊されました。 Like the, everything was all over the place then broken down, but to the ceiling and right across was where the, um, the tsunami had reached. のように、すべてがいたるところにあり、その後壊れましたが、天井と真向かいに津波が到達した場所がありました。 像这样,所有的东西到处都是然后分解了,但是到了天花板,对面就是海啸到达的地方。 So we saw that and it was just awful. We rode through it actually to get to the school, to, to help clean up the school. 私たちは実際に学校に行き、学校を片付けるのを手伝うためにそれを乗り越えました。

And it was, yeah, it was just awful, awful, awful, sad. そして、それは、ええ、それはただひどい、ひどい、ひどい、悲しいものでした。 Just like being, like riding through a movie set. まるで映画のセットに乗っているように。 Heartbreaking to, to think about what had happened there, Natori is the place, uh, just outside of Sendai. そこで何が起こったのかを考えると、仙台のすぐ外にある名取は悲痛な場所です。 So, um, yeah, it was an awful, awful time. それで、ええと、ええ、それはひどい、ひどい時間でした。 Um, we stayed and we helped out, uh, we were scrubbing oil off houses in, um, In, I can't remember the name of the area ええと、私たちは滞在して手伝いました、ええと、私たちは家から油をこすり落としていました、ええと、で、私は地域の名前を思い出せません

now, just outside Sendai. 今、仙台のすぐ外。 There was an oil refinery and then the tsunami had brought in oil in the water. 石油精製所があり、津波が水中に石油を持ち込んだ。 So people's houses were just covered in sludge. Um, uh, what else did we do? Oh, and then the most alarming thing. ああ、それから最も憂慮すべきこと。 And then I'll stop talking about it cause it's, Oh, it's awful. そして、私はそれについて話すのをやめます、なぜならそれは、ああ、それはひどいからです。 I don't know how people live, honestly, with the threat of earthquakes cause it's a genuinely terrifying experience. 正直なところ、地震の脅威が原因で人々がどのように生活しているかはわかりませんが、それは本当に恐ろしい経験です。

Uh, we were there in Sendai then for the, the big aftershock, which was, I think a five point something or six point something magnitude earthquake. ええと、仙台にいたのは、大きな余震でした。マグニチュードが5ポイントか6ポイントだと思います。 Happened at 1:00 AM. So we were in bed and all of a sudden, you're fast asleep and all of a sudden just, of course, your world is shaking, shaking, so violently, um. だから私たちはベッドにいて、突然、あなたはぐっすり眠っていて、突然、あなたの世界は揺れ、揺れ、とても激しく、ええと。 We, all we could do is just jump out of bed and we kind of hunkered down by the side of the bed. 私たちにできることは、ベッドから飛び降りるだけで、ベッドの横に腰を下ろしたようなものです。

I thought I was going to die. 私は死ぬだろうと思った。 That was for sure. それは確かだった。 I was like, this is it. こんな感じでした。 Okay.

It's been great. 素晴らしかったです。

Eric: Geez. Yeah.

I can imagine that. 私はそれを想像することができます。

Elle: Shorter than I thought. エル:思ったより短い。 But, um, but I, yeah, it was just terrifying. しかし、ええと、しかし私は、ええ、それはただ恐ろしいものでした。 Terrifying. 恐ろしい。

Eric: Did you leave soon after that? エリック:その後すぐに出発しましたか? Were you're just like, Oh, I got to go home or did you stay longer? あなたはまるで、ああ、私は家に帰らなければならなかったのですか、それとももっと長く滞在しましたか?

Elle: Um, we stayed for another, uh, until August. エル:ええと、私たちは別の、ええと、8月まで滞在しました。

So it happened in March. So yeah, We stayed until August.

Eric: Because so many foreigners left during that time I heard. エリック:その間にたくさんの外国人が去ったので聞いた。 Yeah.

Elle: They did. Yeah.

A lot of our friends, um, were bused out of Sendai. たくさんの友達が仙台からバスで運ばれました。 Veel van onze vrienden, eh, zijn uit Sendai weggereden. Well, there was like, there was no food, they were alone, a lot of them. ええと、食べ物がなく、一人で、たくさんいたようなものがありました。 They were teaching and living alone. 彼らは一人で教え、生活していました。 So the, I think British embassy, American embassy, whichever countries, embassy sent up buses to bring people down to Tokyo. ですから、イギリス大使館、アメリカ大使館、どちらの国でも、大使館は人々を東京に連れて行くためにバスを送りました。

And then they flew home. そして彼らは家に帰った。 I may have done that if I had been alone, but I had my husband and we were from we all from different countries and, um, We didn't have our passports stupidly when we were on the trip to Nikko. 一人だったらそうだったかもしれませんが、夫がいて、いろいろな国の出身で、日光旅行の時はパスポートを持っていませんでした。 So if we wanted to leave before going back to Sendai, we would only have been issued emergency passports for Canada and the UK, and we didn't want to do that. ですから、仙台に戻る前に出国したいのなら、カナダとイギリスの緊急パスポートしか発行されなかったでしょうし、それはしたくありませんでした。

So, um, yeah, we stayed. And also like Sendai was, our home had been our home for a couple of years up until that point. そして仙台もそうだったように、それまでの数年間、私たちの家は私たちの家でした。 So we were really anxious to get back and see what was, what, what had happened, what it looked like and see if we could help in any way, see how kids, our students, you know, our fellow teachers, Japanese and, um, the, the foreign, uh, foreign teachers that were there. だから私たちは戻って、何が、何が、何が起こったのか、どのように見えるのか、そして私たちが何らかの形で助けることができるかどうか、子供たち、私たちの学生、あなたが知っている、私たちの仲間の教師、日本人、そしてええと、外国人、ええと、そこにいた外国人の先生。

So, yeah.

Eric: Wow. That's crazy. それはクレイジーです。 That's a... interesting experience to have, especially living abroad and, um, but you stuck it out. それは...特に海外に住んでいて、ええと、興味深い経験ですが、あなたはそれを突き刺しました。 Um, um, that's impressive. ええと、ええと、それは印象的です。 Like that would be. そうなるでしょう。 For me, I guess, yeah, it depends if you're obviously in your situation. 私にとって、ええ、それはあなたが明らかにあなたの状況にあるかどうかに依存すると思います。 对我来说,是的,这取决于您是否处于明显的状况。 I know for me, my family would tell me to like, leave right away. 私は私のために知っています、私の家族は私に好きで、すぐに去るように言うでしょう。

Elle: Yeah. Yeah exactly. There's no shame in, like, there was a bit of a, um, divide, I guess you could say, you know, the foreigners who stayed and the foreigners who just like deserted Japan. 恥ずかしくない、ちょっとした、ええと、分裂があった、あなたが知っていると思う、あなたが知っている、滞在した外国人とちょうど日本を捨てたのが好きな外国人。 It's like, come on. さあ、 There is, uh, an active that Fukushima nuclear plant, a whole other disturbing issue. ええと、福島原子力発電所という活発な問題があります。 Um, it's okay to want to, to want to go if you can, you know, um, But yeah, we, we were worried about Fukushima ええと、行きたい、できれば行きたい、ええと、でも、ええと、私たちは福島が心配でした

of course, too. We were, there was a while where we were trying to, we were eating foods that were good for deflecting nuclear radiatio, anything  like... okay, we won't eat food from Fukushima, of course. しばらくの間、核放射線をそらすのに良い食べ物を食べていました。もちろん、福島の食べ物は食べません。 And lots of spinach or seaweed I think it was. ほうれん草や海苔がたくさんあったと思います。 Anyway, it was stressful. とにかくストレスがたまりました。

Eric: Yeah.

Elle: Yeah. Anxiety-inducing time, for sure. 確かに、不安を誘発する時間。

Um, I don't know what the situation is right now with Fukushima. えーと、福島の今の状況はわかりません。 I mean, I know the area, um, around Fukushima is still... not... nobody lives there, right? つまり、福島周辺はまだ…そうではない…誰もそこに住んでいないのですよね? It's totally... それは完全に...

Eric: That's a good question. You know, there are people who still don't have homes I think, like a lot. ご存知のように、まだ家を持っていない人がたくさんいると思います。 Yeah. うん。

So I don't know, but you don't hear much about it. ですからわかりませんが、あまり耳にしません。

I think the Japanese media kind of throws it under the bus, meaning that hey don't talk about it too much. 日本のメディアはそれをバスの下に投げ込んでいると思います。つまり、あまり話さないということです。 I don't know why that is, but, um, yeah, they just, uh, there are, there, there are lots of built like temporary housing. それがなぜなのかはわかりませんが、ええと、ええと、彼らはただ、ええと、そこには、仮設住宅のように建てられたものがたくさんあります。 So I don't know how many people are in there, but there's, if you ever look on YouTube and you search for a few videos, people have gone through and documented, uh, what what's there, which is not much so. だから、そこに何人いるのかはわかりませんが、YouTubeを見て、いくつかのビデオを検索すると、人々はそこに何があるのかを調べて文書化しましたが、それほど多くはありません。

Elle: Um, yeah, I've seen some videos of people who've gone in and, um, you know, you see that animals have reclaimed it, you know, there are packs of wild dogs and deer and everything's overgrown. エル:ええと、ええと、私は入った人々のいくつかのビデオを見ました、そして、ええと、あなたが知っている、あなたは動物がそれを取り戻したのを見ます、あなたが知っている、野生の犬と鹿のパックがあり、すべてが生い茂っています。 I really feel for the people who. 本当にそういう人たちに感じます。 That's it, they left and they went ..Never able to go back. それだけです、彼らは去りました、そして、彼らは行きました..決して戻ることができません。 They couldn't have known that they would never, they would never be able to return to their homes. 彼らは決して彼らが決して彼らの家に戻ることができないであろうことを知ることができなかったでしょう。

It's terrible, terrible event, it really was. それはひどい、ひどい出来事です、それは本当にそうでした。 Um, anyway, let's talk about something more positive. とにかく、もっと前向きなことについて話しましょう。 Yeah, exactly. ええ、その通りです。 I wonder, um, what your favorite trip was while, cause you lived only in Tokyo, right, when you were in Japan? ええと、あなたが日本にいたとき、あなたは東京にしか住んでいなかったので、あなたの好きな旅行は何でしたか?

Eric: Uh, yeah. Only in Tokyo.

Elle: And did you visit anywhere outside of Tokyo that you fell in love with? エル:そして、あなたは東京以外で恋に落ちた場所を訪れましたか?

There were so many amazing places to visit in Japan. 日本には素晴らしい場所がたくさんありました。 Just spoiled for choice. ただ選択のために甘やかされて。 只是宠坏了选择。

Eric: Yeah, that's true. I didn't go to too many places. 私はあまり多くの場所に行きませんでした。 I spent time outside, like I traveled around Tokyo so Nikko, um, Gunma, Saitama, but they're not really the most interesting places. 東京を旅したように外で過ごしたので、日光、ええと、群馬、埼玉ですが、それほど面白い場所ではありません。 I think like Gunma, for example, is just a very small

I guess countryside, uh, city, you can say countryside, city, um, just a very quiet place, but it does have, uh, a really good onsen. 田舎、ええと、都市、あなたは田舎、都市、ええと、とても静かな場所と言うことができますが、それは、ええと、本当に良い温泉を持っています。 Ik denk dat platteland, uh, stad, je kunt platteland, stad, eh, gewoon een heel rustige plek zeggen, maar het heeft echt een hele goede onsen. Um, I think the name is Setsu so, um, I think that's hwo you say it, Setsu onsen. えーと、名前はセツだと思いますので、えーと、セツ温泉と言ってもいいと思います。 And, um, Nikko has a lot of valleys and mountains for hiking, which was good. そして、ええと、日光にはハイキング用の谷や山がたくさんあり、それは良かったです。 Saitama, Not so much, there's not much really to do there. 埼玉、そんなに多くない、そんなにやることはあまりない。

I think it's, it's more for people to live, to commute to Tokyo, but they don't want to be in the, in the city center. 住むこと、東京に通勤することの方が多いと思いますが、都心の中には入りたくないのです。

Elle: Right? エル:そうですか? Yeah.

Eric: Um, I never have gone North. LIke the height, the farthest North I've ever been is Niigata and that's on the opposite side. 高さのように、私が今まで行った中で最も遠い北は新潟であり、それは反対側にあります。 Pretty much of Tokyo, but it's a little bit more North it's above Nagano.

And I've been to Nagano. Uh, one time then I also went to Osaka and Kobe. Kobe I liked a lot. 神戸私はとても好きでした。 Kobe's cool. It's like a, it's like a little Vancouver. Cause you get the, the water, you get the nice scenery. あなたが得るので、水、あなたは素晴らしい景色を得る。

Elle: Yeah, that's true, actually. エル:ええ、それは本当です。 And what did you think of a Osaka? そして、大阪についてどう思いましたか? What did you do there? I found that place. その場所を見つけました。

I went to your in Golden Week, which is a holiday in Japan for anyone who doesn't know when everyone travels in Japan. 誰もがいつ日本を旅行するのかわからない人のための日本の休日であるゴールデンウィークに行きました。 And it was so packed full of people. そして、それはとても人でいっぱいでした。 I couldn't quite believe what I was seeing. 私は自分が見ているものを完全に信じることができませんでした。 It was tough. 大変でした。 And I drove there. そして、私はそこに運転しました。 I was the driver, phew, do not recommend. 私は運転手でした、おい、お勧めしません。 Yeah.

What did you think of Osaka? 大阪についてどう思いましたか?

Eric: It was a pretty fun. I liked the people. Thy're more energetic. They have a bit more free time it seems than Tokyo, uh, people living in Tokyo. 彼らは東京よりも少し自由な時間があります、ええと、東京に住んでいる人々。 It's a little bit more, I think, rough in terms of the scenery, you get more small shops, food stands. もう少し景色が荒いので、小さなお店や屋台が増えます。 People are just crowded around certain areas. 人々は特定の地域の周りに混雑しています。 Um, not as a, unlike Tokyo where it's kind of like everyone's in their own... ええと、東京とは異なり、みんなが一人でいるようなものです...

they go one path and everything's clean. 彼らは一つの道を進み、すべてがきれいです。 Well, everything's clean, but still Osaka, I would say isn't a, like a Tokyo in that sense, but they, I think the people from Osaka have their own way of, uh, just approaching life. さて、すべてがきれいですが、それでも大阪はそういう意味では東京のようではないと思いますが、大阪の人たちは自分なりの生き方をしていると思います。 It's interesting. It's cool. Because they're more, I feel talkative. 彼らはもっと多いので、私はおしゃべりを感じます。 Um, so I found that was interesting. ええと、それで面白いと思いました。

Elle: Yeah. Could you tell, I know this, I know Osaka-ben, right? わかります、これ知ってる、大阪弁知ってるでしょ?

Eric: Oh Kansai-ben?

Elle: Oh Kansai-ben, yeah I couldn't, I, my, I couldn't tell the difference. Um, when I went and listened to people talk. Could you tell the difference?

Eric: No, I can't. I can't really tell the difference. There's a... there's a few things now that I could hear, but it's, for me, it's difficult to pick up.

Um, For sure people who have studied the language a lot, who are fluent, they could probably tell. But for me, there's a few things. Um, just the way, especially with their verb endings, they say things a little differently. Um, but at the time, No I could not cannot tell. ええと、でも当時は、いや、分からなかった。 I just, I could tell they're from Osaka because of their personality. ただ、その性格から大阪出身だと言えます。

Just, they're more outgoing. ただ、彼らはもっと発信的です。

Elle: Oh Interesting.

Huh. And, uh, did you pick up any new hobbies or learn anything new in terms of, uh, I don't know, sports or...

Eric: Oh yeah. So in Japan, um, like Mark, I played ice hockey. I played in, uh, the Tokyo S League it's called, so it's just a few teams. These are company teams. So I played for Marubeni and there is Densu,

there is, um, Uh, what's the car company that I'm thinking of? ええと、ええと、私が考えている自動車会社は何ですか? There's a couple of car companies like Mitsubishi. I think she has a company, um, and a few others. 彼女には会社があります、ええと、他にもいくつかあります。 And we play, uh, we played game... we played games in Higashi Fushimi, is on the Keiō-sen and it's, it's, it's still in Tokyo, but it's going towards Saitama. そして、私たちはゲームをしました...私たちは東伏見でゲームをしました、京王線にあります、そしてそれはまだ東京にあります、しかしそれは埼玉に向かっています。

So it's kind of on the way to Saitama, but. さたまへ行く途中ですが。 Um, that's where we played our games and we practiced in Takadanobaba, which is where I was living. えーと、そこでゲームをしたり、住んでいた高田馬場で練習したりしました。 So it was great because I could walk to practice and to go to the game was easy because it was the same... uh, I lived in a station near station called Shimo-Ochiai , and that's the same line, Keiō-sen. 歩いて練習できて、ゲームに行くのも同じだったので良かったです…えーと、下落合駅近くの駅に住んでいて、同じ路線の京王線です。

I could go to a game play a game easily. 簡単にゲームに行ってゲームをすることができました。 So I was, I lucked out when I moved to, near Takadanobaba, I wanted to play hockey and I found the practice... uh, practices were, uh, walking distance and the games were just a train train ride away. それで、高田馬場の近くに引っ越したとき、運が良かったので、ホッケーをしたいと思って、練習を見つけました...ええと、練習は、ええと、歩いて行ける距離で、ゲームは電車ですぐのところにありました。 And I would just take my stuff. そして、私は自分のものを取るだけです。 It's weird. それは奇妙だ。 Carrying your bag, like in Canada, you drive with your gear and stuff, but I, in Japan, I was carrying my, my hockey equipment, my sticks, trying not to hit people on the train. カナダのように鞄を持って、ギアなどを持って運転しますが、日本では、電車の中で人にぶつからないように、ホッケー用品やスティックを持っていました。

Um, but it was fun. I mean, yeah. We had a fun team. 楽しいチームができました。 We had a mix of foreigners and Japanese. 外国人と日本人が混在していました。 I think most teams were Japanese players. Um, but, uh, it was cool. It was awesome. それはすごかった。 It was great a way to meet new people. Like I think that was one of the best things I did. I think if anyone goes to Japan or a different country, a hobby is a great thing to do. 誰かが日本や他の国に行くなら、趣味は素晴らしいことだと思います。

And, uh, I, uh, yeah, I just happened to find hockey, which is not too easy to find in Japan. そして、ええと、ええと、ええと、ええ、私はちょうど日本で見つけるのはそれほど簡単ではないホッケーを見つけました。 Um, and then we had tournaments games, met friends, uh, Yeah, no, I really enjoyed it. ええと、それからトーナメントゲームをしたり、友達に会ったり、ええと、ええ、いや、本当に楽しかったです。 It was, uh, it was good. ええと、良かったです。 And one surprising thing about that is that adult league in Vancouver, there's not, it's not in contact cause you don't really need to hit just for fun. そして、それについての1つの驚くべきことは、バンクーバーの大人のリーグはありません、それはあなたが本当に楽しみのために打つ必要がないので接触していないということです。 关于这一点,令人惊讶的是,在温哥华的成人联赛没有,没有联系,因为您并不需要纯粹为了娱乐而打。

But in Japan it was full on contact. しかし、日本ではそれは接触でいっぱいでした。 So I haven't played contact in like eight, nine years. だから私は8、9年のように接触をしていません。 所以我八,九年没有接触过。 So it was a weird, like, it was like, what the heck? それで、それは奇妙でした、例えば、それは、一体何のようでしたか? And like, I was like, okay, here you go. そして、私は、大丈夫、ここに行くようなものでした。 Like, this is. I gotta, I gotta keep my head up. 頭を上げておかなければならない。 Like, it was just funny that, that, uh, in Japan of all places, especially in a league, that's not professional, they had contact hockey. まるで、日本では、特にリーグでは、プロではないのに、彼らがホッケーに接触していたのは、ただおかしかったです。

And I thought that was interesting. そして、それは面白いと思いました。 It was fun. I was sore, but it was fun. 痛かったけど楽しかったです。

Elle: I'm surprised by that too. エル:私も驚いています。 You'd think it would be the other way around. あなたはそれが逆だと思うでしょう。 In Canada, I know. カナダでは、私は知っています。 As I spoke with mock in aprevious episode, the violence is very much a part of the game, but Japan is a more reserved and... 前のエピソードでモックと話したように、暴力はゲームの一部ですが、日本はもっと控えめで...

Eric: Which is interesting yeah. エリック:それは面白いですね。 Cause Mark played professional, which is hitting, but they're still reserved compared to yeah, compared to North America. 原因マークはプロとしてプレーしましたが、それはヒットしていますが、北米と比較して、ええと比較してまだ予約されています。 Even the league I was playing in it, it wasn't too anything too crazy. 私がプレーしていたリーグでさえ、それほどクレイジーではありませんでした。 Maybe a fight here and there, some players would fight once in a while, but. たぶんあちこちでの戦い、たまに戦うプレイヤーもいますが。 I have one story that I can share that was pretty funny, but... 共有できる話が1つありますが、それはかなり面白かったですが...

Elle: yeah

Eric: like my players or whatever, they probably won't care. エリック:私の選手か何かのように、彼らはおそらく気にしないでしょう。 I don't even know who it was, but so in this league, um, because it's a rec league, you have to volunteer to ref a game. So they, they always picked two players from a team to ref another game. それで彼らはいつもチームから2人のプレーヤーを選んで別のゲームを参照しました。 Another team's game. I didn't ref because I didn't speak Japanese and they're not going to choose me. 私は日本語を話せなかったし、彼らが私を選ぶつもりがなかったので、私は参照しませんでした。

I don't have experience refereeing to. 審判の経験がありません。 Ik heb geen ervaring als scheidsrechter. We had two players, who were doing ref. refをやっていた2人のプレイヤーがいました。 And by chance that... like the same night they had a party. So they went out to an izakaya and got very drunk. Let's just say like, just way too, too many drinks. ちょうど、あまりにも多くの飲み物のように言いましょう。 And they actually ref this game, but they were, they couldn't even skate on the ice. そして、彼らは実際にこのゲームを参照しました、しかし彼らはそうでした、彼らは氷の上でスケートさえすることができませんでした。

Yeah.

So there's a big, we had, we had a big talking to from like the league, um, Because apparently after you hand in the score sheet, they just drew obscene characters and like all these cryptic messages. リーグのように、大きな話がありました。スコアシートを渡した後、彼らはわいせつなキャラクターを描いただけで、これらすべての不可解なメッセージが好きだったからです。 I wish I was at that game would have been funny. あのゲームにいたら面白かったのに。 But, um, that was like kind of a funny story.

Elle: Oh no.

Eric: Yeah.

I wasn't playing. It was just, it was two teams and two of our players who happened to ref, but I was laughing cause it was just a funny, funny story, like who goes to the game and refs can barely skate because they drank too much sake. たまたま2チームと2人の選手がレファレンスをしたのですが、誰がゲームに行ってレファレンスが酒を飲みすぎたのでかろうじてスケートできるような、おもしろくて面白い話だったので笑っていました。 One of those things only in Japan. 日本だけのもののひとつ。

Elle: And do you still play hockey now here in Vancouver or...?

Eric: Yeah, I played last year having played this year, uh, waiting to, uh, the leagues I think are shut down at the moment. So I don't know. I don't know exactly if I'll be playing this year. 今年プレーするかどうかは正確にはわかりません。 We'll see.

I'd like to, I like to just actually just practice around, but, um, I think that some of the facilities are closed, unfortunately.

Elle: Yeah. Yeah.

I think a lot of things are on hold for a while, but yeah. しばらくの間、多くのことが保留になっていると思いますが、そうです。 Yep. We'll get back into them. それらに戻ります。 Well, Eric, as usual, we could talk more and more and more about Japan. ええと、エリック、いつものように、私たちは日本についてますます話すことができました。 Maybe we'll do another episode, um, but let's call it a day there. たぶん私たちは別のエピソードをするでしょう、ええと、しかしそれをそこで一日と呼びましょう。 Thank you so much. どうもありがとうございます。 Pleasure as always. いつものように喜び。 And yeah, really looking forward to your posts on this. そして、ええ、これに関するあなたの投稿を本当に楽しみにしています。

So 10,000 words of reading a week throughout 2021 in Japanese. つまり、2021年を通して1週間に1万語を日本語で読んだのです。 Wow. Okay.

Good luck. がんばろう。

Eric: Thank you. Thank you.

Elle: Ganbatte!

Eric: Exactly. エリック:その通りです。 We'll be speaking one day. We'll be speaking. 話します。 Well, you'll be learning French. さて、あなたはフランス語を学ぶでしょう。 So, um, yeah, maybe we'll have, we'll get Steve to interpret for us. だから、ええと、ええ、多分私たちは持っているでしょう、私たちはスティーブに私たちのために解釈してもらうでしょう。 You'll speak French. I'll speak Japanese.

Elle: I have to, one day I'll pick up the Japanese again. エル:やらなきゃいけない、いつかまた日本人を迎えに行くよ。

I mean, I do love it when I'm studying French and when I try to speak French, I come out with Japanese all the time. つまり、フランス語を勉強しているときは大好きで、フランス語を話そうとすると、いつも日本語が出てきます。 I don't know how Steve speaks all the languages he does, but yeah, it's definitely the language that's on my mind. スティーブが彼がするすべての言語をどのように話すかはわかりませんが、ええ、それは間違いなく私の頭の中にある言語です。 It's, it's at the forefront, uh, in front of French, you know, but I'm actively studying French. それは、最前線にあります、ええと、フランス語の前にあります、あなたが知っている、しかし私は積極的にフランス語を勉強しています。

So anyway, one day, one day for sure. とにかく、ある日、確かにある日。 Thanks. Okay.

Cheers Eric. 乾杯エリック。 Bye

Bye-bye.