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Autism, 2.04 (V) What are Indicators of ASD in Preschoolers?

In this lesson, we will explore some of the developmental differences seen in children with autism during the pre-school years. Red flags and indicators during the preschool years can include a lack of joint attention, imitation, and social referencing. There may be a delay in spoken language or the child may have communication, but there may be differences in communication. It's often during the preschool years that parents seek out support. This is typically due to the delay the delay in langauge or due to the extreme tantrums and problematic behaviors that the parent is encountering. The child may not play with toys in the manner that they were designed or intended for. And there may be extreme distress when someone attempts to get the child to play with the toys in a different way. There's often a lack of spontaneous functional play and the child may show a limited range of affect or emotion. They may begin showing a restricted area of interest, and they may have difficulty anticipating events and dealing with change. There may also be a delayed use of pointing and other gestures in order to get and sustain the attention of others. In this video, Elizabeth Morgan describes her experiences communicating with extended family members about her son's autism and what it means to advocate for her son. » So explaining autism to family members was definitely not a easy task. And I think it really depends on what generation of my family too. One of the things I would say is true in particular for, I would say, African American families, is that when we're talking about developmental disability or especially autism, it's one of those things that we don't really talk about. It's more taboo. So there's always, I talk about this with my friends, there's always the cousin that did rude things and [LAUGH] they've in their room and stayed with their parents for their lives. No one never said that was a developmental disability, that was just uncle or cousin and we never talked about it. So mentioning that we have a child that had a developmental disability and we accept him and we're not gonna hide him. And we're not going to not talk about it was something at first I think especially my older family members, they weren't quite comfortable with. So we even had to, for some who are interested give them more information and education on it. So, that was something that I think was a part of our process in becoming advocates for our child and what I'm really proud of is that our daughter who is only two years older than my son, she adopted that. So, I think what's really awesome is that she will be with her friends and her friends might ask, hey why does your brother do that? And she will say, well he has autism and he needs that to help his body feel good. He needs to do those type of things. And that makes me really proud because it is something that I know that when we're gone and we're not able, she'll be able to advocate. And I believe even my son will be able to do that for himself to so, those are the ways that it I think that we have communicated and what autism means to others in our family.



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In this lesson, we will explore some of the developmental differences seen in children with autism during the pre-school years. Red flags and indicators during the preschool years can include a lack of joint attention, imitation, and social referencing. There may be a delay in spoken language or the child may have communication, but there may be differences in communication. It's often during the preschool years that parents seek out support. This is typically due to the delay the delay in langauge or due to the extreme tantrums and problematic behaviors that the parent is encountering. The child may not play with toys in the manner that they were designed or intended for. And there may be extreme distress when someone attempts to get the child to play with the toys in a different way. There's often a lack of spontaneous functional play and the child may show a limited range of affect or emotion. They may begin showing a restricted area of interest, and they may have difficulty anticipating events and dealing with change. There may also be a delayed use of pointing and other gestures in order to get and sustain the attention of others. In this video, Elizabeth Morgan describes her experiences communicating with extended family members about her son's autism and what it means to advocate for her son. » So explaining autism to family members was definitely not a easy task. And I think it really depends on what generation of my family too. One of the things I would say is true in particular for, I would say, African American families, is that when we're talking about developmental disability or especially autism, it's one of those things that we don't really talk about. It's more taboo. So there's always, I talk about this with my friends, there's always the cousin that did rude things and [LAUGH] they've in their room and stayed with their parents for their lives. No one never said that was a developmental disability, that was just uncle or cousin and we never talked about it. So mentioning that we have a child that had a developmental disability and we accept him and we're not gonna hide him. And we're not going to not talk about it was something at first I think especially my older family members, they weren't quite comfortable with. So we even had to, for some who are interested give them more information and education on it. So, that was something that I think was a part of our process in becoming advocates for our child and what I'm really proud of is that our daughter who is only two years older than my son, she adopted that. So, I think what's really awesome is that she will be with her friends and her friends might ask, hey why does your brother do that? And she will say, well he has autism and he needs that to help his body feel good. He needs to do those type of things. And that makes me really proud because it is something that I know that when we're gone and we're not able, she'll be able to advocate. And I believe even my son will be able to do that for himself to so, those are the ways that it I think that we have communicated and what autism means to others in our family.


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