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English LingQ Podcast 1.0, Twenty-six: Writing Analysis, Tony Sparkle

Twenty-six: Writing Analysis, Tony Sparkle

Steve: Hi, Jill.

Jill: Hi, Steve, how are you?

Steve: I'm fine, thank you.

Jill: Good.

Steve: We are 'who are we? We are EnglishLingQ.com, which we spell English E N G L I S H Lingq L I N G Q, EnglishLingq.com and we hope that we are providing an interesting Podcast on English at different levels and, today, it's kind of like an intermediate level on subjects of interest to people and, in particular, to members of The Linguist, thelinguist.com, which is our English learning website. Jill, what have you got for us today?

Jill: So, in our previous Podcasts, we have been talking about useful phrases and words from some of our content; some of our easy content; some of our more difficult content. Today, we are actually going to talk about a writing submission that one of our long-time members submitted. On The Linguist you can submit writing and we correct it for you and send it back. So, Tony is a member from Taiwan.

Steve: Tony has been with us for a long time.

Jill: Yeah, for two and a half years.

Steve: Wow!

Jill: One of our first members and definitely the longest-running member that we've ever had on The Linguist. He is very keen. He is a very hard worker

Steve: and he has improved a lot.

Jill: He's improved; it's amazing how much he's improved since he first started. He has saved, you know, 12,000 words and phrases. He's learned about 7,000 of them, so that means he's, you know, reviewed them enough times, tested them, so they've become known words.

Steve: These are all the statistics that we generate in The Linguist System, so that the learners can keep track of their progress, which, I think, for many people, certainly for me, that would be quite motivating just to see that all my efforts are actually because sometimes you feel gees, I've been at it and, you know, sometimes you feel you are speaking well and then you are in a situation where you're kind of stumbling and not able to say what you want to say.

Jill: You feel like you are not progressing and you get discouraged, but. Yes, so we have all these statistics. You know, just in the past year, he?s listened for over 200 hours.

Steve: Wow.

Jill: So, he's worked very hard and it's paid off. He's made a lot of progress. So, we're going to talk about one of his writing submissions today and just some of the useful phrases in it, maybe some of the mistakes he made and then, also, a little bit his submission is about having a tooth pulled, so we may also speak a little bit about experiences that we've had.

Steve: You know, we should say, too, that we are very happy to get requests from our learners. We are only too happy to respond to specific requests. Obviously, in this modern world of Podcasting, we don't know who we're talking to out there, but we are particularly interested in looking after our learners. So, when we get a request like this from Tony, 'Please talk about my writing submission', we are just only too happy to do it. Jill: Right; exactly. So, as I said, Tony submitted some writing about having his teeth pulled and how it was not a very pleasant experience. So, we'll just talk about some of the phrases.

Steve: Alright. Which phrases, in particular, did you find?

Jill: Well, you know, he started out saying 'last Friday', which is correct. I thought it was sort of important to bring up because a lot of people don't know how to express something that happened last week. They will say 'since last Friday' or 'since Friday' or 'before Friday' or 'some days ago'. They have, sometimes, a hard time figuring out how to say that so, I just thought that was useful; 'last Friday' meaning this past Friday, one that has already passed. Then, he went on to say 'This was not my first time of being pulled teeth', which is not correct. Steve: Right.

Jill: And, basically, our correction, we replaced it with 'This was not my first time having a tooth pulled. ' Steve: Right.

It's interesting, 'first time' to have something done. He could have said 'This was not my first time to have a teeth pulled.' 'My first time having a tooth pulled' or 'to have a tooth pulled'. Jill: That's right.

Steve: If he had said 'This is not my first time pulling teeth' that would suggest that he was the dentist. Jill: He's the dentist. He's the one pulling the teeth.

Steve: Right.

I wouldn't want to be the patient if it was the first time that he's pulling teeth.

Jill: Exactly. Then, he goes on to say 'is probably a horrible one in my pulling teeth history'. So, our correction was 'is probably the most horrible one in my dental history'. So, we corrected it. A lot of people have problems with that, 'the most'. Steve: The other thing that's there is both those phrases are very sort of Chinese-inspired. Tony's native language is Chinese. I'm not sure whether it's Taiwanese or Mandarin, but I know he speaks both. But, you know, he says 'a horrible one in my pulling teeth history'. In English we have to say 'in my history of having my teeth pulled'. You can't have 'my pulling teeth history', but in Chinese you can. Jill: Right.

Steve: It's a very efficient way. I mean, Chinese, in that sense, to my mind, is more efficient than English, but we just don't say it.

Jill: Right.

Steve: So, very often, I know Chinese people will say, you know, 'my on top of the hill house'. No; 'my house, which is on top of the hill'. We have to use a separate phrase or a separate clause there.

Jill: Lots of added words in there. And, again, 'the most', which means, you know, you are comparing it to any other occurrence. Steve: Right; a very good point. He said 'but is probably a horrible one in my pulling teeth history'. Yeah, we would normally say 'the most horrible one' Jill: emphasizing that it's the worst. It's worse than any other dental experience that he's had. Then, he goes on to say 'The doctor spent about double times struggling pulling my giant tooth.' So, we changed it to 'spent about twice the usual amount of time'. Steve: You know, it's very difficult. I mean, 'double time'. Double time, normally, to me, suggests someone I go back to when I had football practice in high school and I had to run double time. That means we had to make twice as many, you know, steps within the same amount of time. Double time

Jill: And, we use that, too, again?

Steve: Or for overtime we talk about double overtime. No.

Jill: double overtime, but not double time. But, yeah, I have that in some exercise classes that I do. It's the same thing. You know, you're doing something single time and then they'll say do it double time, so you do it quicker. But, we don't use it in the sense that.

Steve: But, I would say, it's a very honest mistake. It points out that we are always best to use, where we can, phrases that we have seen before and because we don't say double time in that sense, which is not something that Tony would know. But, yeah, sometimes I find we have to try, very often, try to use a few more words. Don't try to shorten everything up. Because you're shortening it up into a phrase it may, in fact, not be a phrase that works.

Jill: Right, right.

Steve: So, the correct phrase is 'twice the usual amount of time'. The doctor spent twice the usual amount of time. Or, he could have said, the doctor spent twice as much time as normal or twice as much time as usual. So, there's always more than one way to translate these things. There's also more than one way to be wrong, of course.

Jill: Of course.

Jill: Tony goes on to say 'I felt my jaw seemed to be'. And, you know, of course, we changed it to 'My jaw felt like it was being'. Steve: This is a very important structure and I have mentioned it to Tony before. 'Seemed as if'; 'felt as if'; 'I felt my jaw seem to be torn off.' No.

'I felt as if my jaw' I don't know what other translation'? My jaw felt like it was being torn off? or 'I felt as if my jaw was being torn off? or 'It seemed as if my jaw was being torn off'. The 'felt' Jill: or 'It seemed like my jaw' Steve: 'It seemed like', but you can't have the 'felt' and the 'seemed'. That's overkill. You don't need them both. So, what I would suggest to Tony or others is, save the word 'feel' or 'felt', 'felt like' or whatever, and save the word 'seem' or 'seemed' and see what kinds of example sentences you generate in the Review Section of The Linguist. Those are very useful structures; 'felt like', 'seemed as if', you know, 'felt as if' and so, you've really got to get to where you can use them because you need to use them all the time. To me, that's a more important structure than 'double time' or 'twice the usual amount of time'; that's fine. But, this one here, Tony should get right.

Jill: Yeah, yeah, that's right.

Steve: If I were correcting I would put an unhappy picture there

Jill: to emphasize.

Steve: Emphasize; not good, not good.

Jill: Then, Tony goes on to say there was a 'big hurt in my jaw'. So, there can't be a hurt. You can have a pain. You can be hurt.

Steve: Right.

Sometimes the word 'hurt' is used as a noun when we are talking about emotional hurt, you know. Jill: Right.

I felt hurt. Somebody hurt my feelings.

Steve: Well, hurt my feelings, but it was 'I think we sometimes use it as a noun; maybe not, okay. Jill: Yeah.

Steve: But, at any rate, 'it hurt' the verb. It hurt, okay, or there was great pain.

Jill: Exactly. There wasn't a big hurt. You can't say that.

Steve: No.

Jill: Then, he goes on to say 'Over the past week, I could not eat anything but drink some milk or eat some cereal only. So, we changed it to 'Over the past week, I could not eat anything except milk and cereal. ' Steve: Right.

I don't like to disagree with our Correctors, but one of the things that I think is very important is consistency. So, even in the correction, we say 'I could not eat anything except milk'. Well, we don't eat milk.

Jill: No.

Steve: We drink milk.

Jill: Right.

Steve: So, we should really, then, use a few more words and that was partly what was wrong with Tony, here. 'I could not eat anything but drink'. In a way, he's a little better; he's trying.

Jill: He's trying to do that, yeah.

Steve: I could not eat anything. Stop. 'I could only drink milk.' But, of course, it's not that he could not eat anything. 'I could not eat everything', really. Jill: Yeah.

Steve: I could only drink milk and eat some cereal. And, he should probably mention that it's a very loose cereal. Or, maybe not; cereal is pretty soft.

Jill: Well, once the milk gets in there it softens it up quite a lot.

Steve: Yeah. And that's one of those structures where, I mean, we can't sit here very quickly and come up with the best way of doing it. But, very often, when you are stuck like that use more words.

Jill: Use more words, exactly. Make it into two sentences.

Steve: Right.

Jill: Often, people are afraid of that. They are trying to get all their thoughts into one sentence and sometimes, you know, it's fine. Just put a period and then continue on with a new sentence.

Steve: You know, I think in writing, short sentences are key. And, the second thing is make sure the meaning is clear. If the meaning is not totally clear to you, if there is any ambiguity, right, -- 'ambiguity' means uncertain meaning, if there is any ambiguity or uncertainty, if it's not clear to you writing it, it for sure won't be clear to the person reading it. Jill: Right.

Steve: So, it's always worthwhile to use extra words, make a stop, start a new sentence, make sure it's clear.

Jill: And, you know, a lot of people have that problem. I see it in writing submissions all the time; you know, using a lot of run-on sentences, as we call them. So, you know, they have this thought and it just goes on and on and on in one sentence and then they're confused and it's impossible to follow as the reader and now you don't even know what they're talking about anymore. And so, better to have, you know, a few more sentences, but shorter sentences.

Steve: Right.

So, the two last points that I think are quite important in this -- one is the idea of consistency. I couldn't eat anything but drink milk. No, that doesn't work. You've got 'If I couldn't eat anything except cereal, I could also drink milk. If you are talking about 'eat', then talk about things that you eat. Jill: food.

Steve: Well, food that you eat; that's right. If it's something that you drink, you have to introduce a separate verb to deal with the drinking situation.

Jill: Or, you could say, I could not eat or drink anything except milk.

Steve: That's right. Or, I couldn't consume anything or whatever. But, if you are using the word 'eat' it implies that you are chewing it. Jill: That's right.

Steve: We drink liquids. So, one issue here is to be consistent and the other one is to make sure that what you have to say is clear. Don't be afraid to make more short sentences.

Jill: And a couple more important phrases here. Again, he goes on to say 'I went to see the dentist who checked the hurt of my mouth.' So, we corrected it and said 'to check the condition of my mouth'. You could say 'to check the pain in my mouth' I think would be more accurate. Steve: That's what I would have put. Yeah, I think, because Tony is trying to say that he went to the doctor because his mouth was sore. So, he asked the doctor to check out why his mouth was sore; to check what was causing the pain in his mouth.

Jill: Right.

Then, he said 'The doctor told me that my hurt recovered very well.' So, that 'my jaw' recovered very well; that, you know, you could say 'my cut' Steve: I would not have said 'my jaw' just that I had recovered very well. I mean, what we are talking specifically about is the tooth, the roots of the teeth, the gums' it's just that Tony's recovered. Jill: Yeah, yeah.

Steve: But, yeah, certainly, I don't envy Tony and I wouldn't want to have been him in that situation.

Jill: No.

At the end of his writing submission, actually, he does go on to say, or within it he says, that the dentist had to try many times. It wouldn't come out, so he had to keep pulling it and so I'm sure that was horrible. And, at the end, Tony goes on to say that the dentist said another wisdom tooth is coming in crookedly or not properly and it's going to need to be pulled as well. And so, it was, you know, not the news that Tony wanted to hear after that experience.

Steve: My advice to Tony: get another dentist.

Jill: Exactly! Get another dentist.

Steve: Get another dentist. The other thing that I would like to ask Tony is, as an experiment when he goes to have his next wisdom tooth pulled, see if he can listen to The Linguist English Content while he's having his teeth pulled.

Jill: Maybe it will distract him from the pain.

Steve: This is part of our experiment. It's possible that having your teeth pulled stimulates certain neurons in your brain and that might be beneficial for language learning. We can run a little experiment.

Jill: A new experiment.

Steve: Okay. Poor Tony; that wasn't a very pleasant experience, but it was an interesting article. Okay, I think that probably we've covered it.

Jill: I think so.

Steve: So, yeah, let's just say EnglishLingQ.com, that's us. We have a variety of type of content. We have easy stories, we have ordinary conversation; some are easy, some are difficult. We hope people enjoy them. We welcome any feedback. If people are members of The Linguist, we would be happy to respond to any requests. If you want us to talk about a particular item in The Linguist Library that you are studying or if you want us to look at some writing samples that you have submitted for correction, we are only too happy to do that. Okay. Thank you.

Jill: See you next time.

Steve: Bye, bye.

Jill: Bye, bye.


Twenty-six: Writing Analysis, Tony Sparkle

Steve: Hi, Jill. Steve: Cześć, Jill.

Jill: Hi, Steve, how are you?

Steve: I’m fine, thank you.

Jill: Good.

Steve: We are 'who are we? We are EnglishLingQ.com, which we spell English E N G L I S H Lingq L I N G Q, EnglishLingq.com and we hope that we are providing an interesting Podcast on English at different levels and, today, it’s kind of like an intermediate level on subjects of interest to people and, in particular, to members of The Linguist, thelinguist.com, which is our English learning website. Jill, what have you got for us today?

Jill: So, in our previous Podcasts, we have been talking about useful phrases and words from some of our content; some of our easy content; some of our more difficult content. Today, we are actually going to talk about a writing submission that one of our long-time members submitted. Aujourd'hui, nous allons en fait parler d'un mémoire rédigé par l'un de nos membres de longue date. On The Linguist you can submit writing and we correct it for you and send it back. Sur The Linguist, vous pouvez soumettre des écrits et nous les corrigeons pour vous et vous les renvoyons. So, Tony is a member from Taiwan.

Steve: Tony has been with us for a long time.

Jill: Yeah, for two and a half years. Jill : Ouais, pendant deux ans et demi.

Steve: Wow!

Jill: One of our first members and definitely the longest-running member that we’ve ever had on The Linguist. Jill : L'un de nos premiers membres et certainement le membre le plus ancien que nous ayons jamais eu sur The Linguist. He is very keen. He is a very hard worker C'est un travailleur très acharné

Steve: and he has improved a lot.

Jill: He’s improved; it’s amazing how much he’s improved since he first started. He has saved, you know, 12,000 words and phrases. He’s learned about 7,000 of them, so that means he’s, you know, reviewed them enough times, tested them, so they’ve become known words. Il en a appris environ 7 000, ce qui signifie qu'il les a, vous savez, passés en revue suffisamment de fois, les a testés, donc ils sont devenus des mots connus.

Steve: These are all the statistics that we generate in The Linguist System, so that the learners can keep track of their progress, which, I think, for many people, certainly for me, that would be quite motivating just to see that all my efforts are actually because sometimes you feel gees, I’ve been at it and, you know, sometimes you feel you are speaking well and then you are in a situation where you’re kind of stumbling and not able to say what you want to say. Steve : Ce sont toutes les statistiques que nous générons dans The Linguist System, afin que les apprenants puissent suivre leurs progrès, ce qui, je pense, pour beaucoup de gens, certainement pour moi, ce serait assez motivant juste de voir que tous mes les efforts sont en fait parce que parfois vous vous sentez gees, j'y ai été et, vous savez, parfois vous sentez que vous parlez bien et alors vous êtes dans une situation où vous trébuchez et ne pouvez pas dire ce que vous voulez dire. Стів: Це всі статистичні дані, які ми створюємо в The Linguist System, щоб учні могли відстежувати свій прогрес, що, я думаю, для багатьох людей, безперечно для мене, було б дуже мотивуючим просто побачити, що всі мої Насправді зусилля полягають у тому, що інколи ти відчуваєш, що це не так, я був у цьому, і, знаєш, іноді ти відчуваєш, що говориш добре, а потім опиняєшся в ситуації, коли ти спотикаєшся і не можеш сказати те, що хочеш казати.

Jill: You feel like you are not progressing and you get discouraged, but. Yes, so we have all these statistics. You know, just in the past year, he?s listened for over 200 hours.

Steve: Wow.

Jill: So, he’s worked very hard and it’s paid off. He’s made a lot of progress. So, we’re going to talk about one of his writing submissions today and just some of the useful phrases in it, maybe some of the mistakes he made and then, also, a little bit his submission is about having a tooth pulled, so we may also speak a little bit about experiences that we’ve had. Donc, nous allons parler de l'une de ses soumissions écrites aujourd'hui et de quelques-unes des phrases utiles qu'elle contient, peut-être de certaines des erreurs qu'il a commises et puis, aussi, un peu sa soumission concerne le fait de se faire arracher une dent, donc nous pouvons aussi parler un peu des expériences que nous avons eues. それで、今日は彼の執筆の提出物の1つと、その中のいくつかの有用なフレーズ、おそらく彼が犯した間違いのいくつか、そしてまた、彼の提出物は歯を抜くことについてです。また、私たちが経験したことについて少し話すかもしれません。 Отже, сьогодні ми поговоримо про одне з його письмових заяв і лише про деякі корисні фрази в ньому, можливо, про деякі помилки, які він зробив, а також про те, що він вирвав зуб, тому ми також можемо трохи поговорити про досвід, який ми мали.

Steve: You know, we should say, too, that we are very happy to get requests from our learners. Steve : Vous savez, nous devrions également dire que nous sommes très heureux de recevoir des demandes de nos apprenants. We are only too happy to respond to specific requests. Obviously, in this modern world of Podcasting, we don’t know who we’re talking to out there, but we are particularly interested in looking after our learners. Évidemment, dans ce monde moderne du podcasting, nous ne savons pas à qui nous parlons, mais nous sommes particulièrement intéressés à prendre soin de nos apprenants. So, when we get a request like this from Tony, 'Please talk about my writing submission', we are just only too happy to do it. Ainsi, lorsque nous recevons une demande comme celle-ci de Tony, "Veuillez parler de ma soumission d'écriture", nous ne sommes que trop heureux de le faire. Jill: Right; exactly. So, as I said, Tony submitted some writing about having his teeth pulled and how it was not a very pleasant experience. Donc, comme je l'ai dit, Tony a soumis des écrits sur le fait de s'être fait arracher les dents et sur le fait que ce n'était pas une expérience très agréable. So, we’ll just talk about some of the phrases.

Steve: Alright. Which phrases, in particular, did you find?

Jill: Well, you know, he started out saying 'last Friday', which is correct. Jill : Eh bien, vous savez, il a commencé par dire « vendredi dernier », ce qui est exact. I thought it was sort of important to bring up because a lot of people don’t know how to express something that happened last week. Je pensais que c'était assez important d'en parler parce que beaucoup de gens ne savent pas comment exprimer quelque chose qui s'est passé la semaine dernière. They will say 'since last Friday' or 'since Friday' or 'before Friday' or 'some days ago'. Ils diront 'depuis vendredi dernier' ou 'depuis vendredi' ou 'avant vendredi' ou 'il y a quelques jours'. They have, sometimes, a hard time figuring out how to say that so, I just thought that was useful; 'last Friday' meaning this past Friday, one that has already passed. Ils ont parfois du mal à comprendre comment dire ça, alors j'ai juste pensé que c'était utile; 'vendredi dernier' signifiant ce vendredi passé, celui qui est déjà passé. Then, he went on to say 'This was not my first time of being pulled teeth', which is not correct. Puis, il a poursuivi en disant "Ce n'était pas la première fois que je me fais arracher les dents", ce qui n'est pas correct. それから、彼は続けて「これは私の初めての歯を抜かれたのではない」と言いましたが、それは正しくありません。 Steve: Right.

Jill: And, basically, our correction, we replaced it with 'This was not my first time having a tooth pulled. ' Jill : Et, en gros, notre correction, nous l'avons remplacée par "Ce n'était pas la première fois que je me fais arracher une dent". ' Steve: Right.

It’s interesting, 'first time' to have something done. He could have said 'This was not my first time to have a teeth pulled.' 'My first time having a tooth pulled' or 'to have a tooth pulled'. Jill: That’s right.

Steve: If he had said 'This is not my first time pulling teeth' that would suggest that he was the dentist. Jill: He’s the dentist. Jill : C'est le dentiste. He’s the one pulling the teeth.

Steve: Right.

I wouldn’t want to be the patient if it was the first time that he’s pulling teeth. Je ne voudrais pas être le patient si c'était la première fois qu'il arrachait des dents.

Jill: Exactly. Then, he goes on to say 'is probably a horrible one in my pulling teeth history'. So, our correction was 'is probably the most horrible one in my dental history'. Donc, notre correction a été « est probablement la plus horrible de mon histoire dentaire ». So, we corrected it. A lot of people have problems with that, 'the most'. Steve: The other thing that’s there is both those phrases are very sort of Chinese-inspired. Steve: L'autre chose qu'il y a, c'est que ces deux phrases sont très inspirées par le chinois. Tony’s native language is Chinese. I’m not sure whether it’s Taiwanese or Mandarin, but I know he speaks both. But, you know, he says 'a horrible one in my pulling teeth history'. Mais, vous savez, il dit "une histoire horrible dans mon histoire d'arrachage de dents". In English we have to say 'in my history of having my teeth pulled'. You can’t have 'my pulling teeth history', but in Chinese you can. Jill: Right.

Steve: It’s a very efficient way. I mean, Chinese, in that sense, to my mind, is more efficient than English, but we just don’t say it. Je veux dire, le chinois, dans ce sens, à mon avis, est plus efficace que l'anglais, mais nous ne le disons tout simplement pas.

Jill: Right.

Steve: So, very often, I know Chinese people will say, you know, 'my on top of the hill house'. Steve : Donc, très souvent, je sais que les Chinois diront, vous savez, « ma maison au sommet de la colline ». No; 'my house, which is on top of the hill'. We have to use a separate phrase or a separate clause there.

Jill: Lots of added words in there. And, again, 'the most', which means, you know, you are comparing it to any other occurrence. І, знову ж таки, «найбільш», що означає, ви знаєте, ви порівнюєте це з будь-яким іншим явищем. Steve: Right; a very good point. He said 'but is probably a horrible one in my pulling teeth history'. Yeah, we would normally say 'the most horrible one' Jill: emphasizing that it’s the worst. Джилл: підкреслюючи, що це найгірше. It’s worse than any other dental experience that he’s had. Then, he goes on to say 'The doctor spent about double times struggling pulling my giant tooth.' Puis, il poursuit en disant "Le médecin a passé environ le double à lutter pour arracher ma dent géante." So, we changed it to 'spent about twice the usual amount of time'. Donc, nous l'avons changé en "passé environ deux fois plus de temps que d'habitude". Steve: You know, it’s very difficult. I mean, 'double time'. Double time, normally, to me, suggests someone I go back to when I had football practice in high school and I had to run double time. Le temps double, normalement, pour moi, suggère quelqu'un vers qui je retourne quand j'avais un entraînement de football au lycée et que je devais courir le temps double. That means we had to make twice as many, you know, steps within the same amount of time. Cela signifie que nous avons dû faire deux fois plus, vous savez, d'étapes dans le même laps de temps. Double time

Jill: And, we use that, too, again? Jill : Et, nous l'utilisons aussi, encore une fois ?

Steve: Or for overtime we talk about double overtime. Steve : Ou pour les heures supplémentaires, on parle d'heures supplémentaires doubles. No.

Jill: double overtime, but not double time. Jill : double prolongation, mais pas double. But, yeah, I have that in some exercise classes that I do. Mais, oui, j'ai ça dans certains cours d'exercices que je fais. It’s the same thing. You know, you’re doing something single time and then they’ll say do it double time, so you do it quicker. Vous savez, vous faites quelque chose une seule fois et puis ils vous diront de le faire deux fois, donc vous le faites plus vite. But, we don’t use it in the sense that. Mais, nous ne l'utilisons pas dans le sens que.

Steve: But, I would say, it’s a very honest mistake. Steve : Mais je dirais que c'est une erreur très honnête. It points out that we are always best to use, where we can, phrases that we have seen before and because we don’t say double time in that sense, which is not something that Tony would know. Cela souligne qu'il est toujours préférable d'utiliser, là où nous le pouvons, des phrases que nous avons vues auparavant et parce que nous ne disons pas double temps dans ce sens, ce que Tony ne saurait pas. Daha önce gördüğümüz ifadeleri kullanmak için her zaman en iyisi olduğumuzu ve bu anlamda çifte zaman söylemediğimizi, çünkü Tony'nin bileceği bir şey olmadığını belirtiyor. But, yeah, sometimes I find we have to try, very often, try to use a few more words. Mais, oui, parfois je trouve que nous devons essayer, très souvent, essayer d'utiliser quelques mots de plus. Ama, evet, bazen denemek zorunda olduğumuzu bulduk, çoğu kez, birkaç kelime daha kullanmaya çalışacağız. Don’t try to shorten everything up. N'essayez pas de tout raccourcir. Her şeyi kısaltmaya çalışmayın. Because you’re shortening it up into a phrase it may, in fact, not be a phrase that works. Parce que vous le raccourcissez en une phrase, il se peut, en fait, qu'il ne s'agisse pas d'une phrase qui fonctionne. Çünkü bir cümleye kısaltıyorsunuz, aslında işe yarayan bir cümle olmayabilir.

Jill: Right, right.

Steve: So, the correct phrase is 'twice the usual amount of time'. Steve: Der richtige Ausdruck lautet also "doppelt so viel Zeit". Steve: Yani, doğru ifade “normal zamanın iki katıdır”. The doctor spent twice the usual amount of time. Der Arzt verbrachte doppelt so viel Zeit wie gewöhnlich. Or, he could have said, the doctor spent twice as much time as normal or twice as much time as usual. Oder er hätte sagen können, der Arzt verbrachte doppelt so viel Zeit wie normal oder doppelt so viel Zeit wie gewöhnlich. Veya, doktorun normalde iki katı kadar zaman harcadığını ya da normalde iki kat daha fazla zaman harcadığını söyleyebilirdi. So, there’s always more than one way to translate these things. Donc, il y a toujours plus d'une façon de traduire ces choses. Yani, her zaman bu şeyleri tercüme etmenin birden fazla yolu vardır. There’s also more than one way to be wrong, of course. Natürlich gibt es auch mehr als einen Weg, sich zu irren. Il y a aussi plus d'une façon de se tromper, bien sûr.

Jill: Of course.

Jill: Tony goes on to say 'I felt my jaw seemed to be'. Jill: Tony fährt fort: "Ich hatte das Gefühl, mein Kiefer schien zu sein." Jill : Tony continue en disant : « J'ai senti que ma mâchoire semblait être ». Jill: Tony, 'Çenemin benim gibi görünüyor' dediğini söylemeye devam ediyor. Джилл: Далі Тоні каже: «Я відчув, що моя щелепа, здавалося, була». And, you know, of course, we changed it to 'My jaw felt like it was being'. Und natürlich haben wir es in "Mein Kiefer fühlte sich an wie es war" geändert. Et, vous savez, bien sûr, nous l'avons changé en "Ma mâchoire avait l'impression d'être". Ve bilirsin, elbette, onu 'Benim çene hissettim' diye değiştirdik. І, ви знаєте, звичайно, ми змінили це на «Моя щелепа відчувала, що це відбувається». Steve: This is a very important structure and I have mentioned it to Tony before. Steve : C'est une structure très importante et j'en ai déjà parlé à Tony. 'Seemed as if'; 'felt as if'; 'I felt my jaw seem to be torn off.' 'Semblait comme si'; 'senti comme si'; "J'ai senti que ma mâchoire semblait être arrachée." 'Göründüğü gibi'; 'sanki hissettim'; 'Çenemin yırtılmış gibi geldiğini hissettim.' No.

'I felt as if my jaw' I don’t know what other translation'? "J'avais l'impression que ma mâchoire" je ne sais quelle autre traduction " ? My jaw felt like it was being torn off? Ma mâchoire avait l'impression d'être arrachée? or 'I felt as if my jaw was being torn off? ya da çenemin koptuğunu hissettim mi? or 'It seemed as if my jaw was being torn off'. The 'felt' Jill: or 'It seemed like my jaw' Jill: ya da 'Çenem gibi görünüyordu' Steve: 'It seemed like', but you can’t have the 'felt' and the 'seemed'. Steve : "Cela ressemblait à", mais vous ne pouvez pas avoir le "ressenti" et le "ressemblé". Steve: 'Gibi görünüyordu' ama 'hissettim' ve 'gibiydi' olamaz. That’s overkill. C'est exagéré. Bu aşırı sıkıcı. You don’t need them both. So, what I would suggest to Tony or others is, save the word 'feel' or 'felt', 'felt like' or whatever, and save the word 'seem' or 'seemed' and see what kinds of example sentences you generate in the Review Section of The Linguist. Also, was ich Tony oder anderen vorschlagen würde, ist, das Wort "fühlen" oder "fühlen", "fühlen wie" oder was auch immer zu speichern und das Wort "scheinen" oder "schien" zu speichern und zu sehen, welche Arten von Beispielsätzen Sie generieren in der Review-Sektion von The Linguist. Donc, ce que je suggérerais à Tony ou à d'autres, c'est de sauvegarder le mot 'feel' ou 'felt', 'ressenti' ou autre, et de sauvegarder le mot 'sembler' ou 'sembler' et de voir quels types d'exemples de phrases vous générez dans la section Review de The Linguist. Those are very useful structures; 'felt like', 'seemed as if', you know, 'felt as if' and so, you’ve really got to get to where you can use them because you need to use them all the time. Ce sont des structures très utiles; 'ressenti', 'semblé comme si', vous savez, 'senti comme si' et donc, vous devez vraiment vous rendre là où vous pouvez les utiliser parce que vous devez les utiliser tout le temps. To me, that’s a more important structure than 'double time' or 'twice the usual amount of time'; that’s fine. Für mich ist das eine wichtigere Struktur als "doppelte Zeit" oder "doppelt so viel Zeit"; das ist gut. But, this one here, Tony should get right. Ama buradaki bu, Tony haklı olmalı.

Jill: Yeah, yeah, that’s right.

Steve: If I were correcting I would put an unhappy picture there Steve : Si je corrigeais, je mettrais une image malheureuse là-bas

Jill: to emphasize. Jill : pour souligner.

Steve: Emphasize; not good, not good. Steve : Insistez ; pas bien, pas bien.

Jill: Then, Tony goes on to say there was a 'big hurt in my jaw'. Jill : Ensuite, Tony poursuit en disant qu'il y avait une "grosse blessure à la mâchoire". So, there can’t be a hurt. Es kann also keinen Schmerz geben. Yani, yaralanamaz. You can have a pain. You can be hurt.

Steve: Right.

Sometimes the word 'hurt' is used as a noun when we are talking about emotional hurt, you know. Manchmal wird das Wort "verletzt" als Substantiv verwendet, wenn wir über emotionalen Schmerz sprechen, wissen Sie. Jill: Right.

I felt hurt. Ich fühlte mich verletzt. Somebody hurt my feelings. Jemand hat meine Gefühle verletzt. Birisi duygularımı incitti.

Steve: Well, hurt my feelings, but it was 'I think we sometimes use it as a noun; maybe not, okay. Jill: Yeah.

Steve: But, at any rate, 'it hurt' the verb. It hurt, okay, or there was great pain. Es tat weh, okay, oder es gab große Schmerzen.

Jill: Exactly. There wasn’t a big hurt. You can’t say that.

Steve: No.

Jill: Then, he goes on to say 'Over the past week, I could not eat anything but drink some milk or eat some cereal only. Jill: Dann sagt er weiter: „In der letzten Woche konnte ich nichts anderes essen, als etwas Milch zu trinken oder nur etwas Müsli zu essen. So, we changed it to 'Over the past week, I could not eat anything except milk and cereal. ' Also haben wir es in 'In der letzten Woche konnte ich nichts außer Milch und Müsli essen. ' Steve: Right.

I don’t like to disagree with our Correctors, but one of the things that I think is very important is consistency. Ich mag es nicht, unseren Korrektoren zu widersprechen, aber eines der Dinge, die ich für sehr wichtig halte, ist die Konsistenz. Je n'aime pas être en désaccord avec nos correcteurs, mais l'une des choses qui me semble très importante est la cohérence. Düzelticilerimize katılmamaktan hoşlanmıyorum, ama bence çok önemli olan şeylerden biri tutarlılık. So, even in the correction, we say 'I could not eat anything except milk'. Selbst bei der Korrektur sagen wir: "Ich konnte nichts außer Milch essen." Alors, même dans la correction, on dit 'Je ne pouvais rien manger d'autre que du lait'. Well, we don’t eat milk. Wir essen keine Milch.

Jill: No.

Steve: We drink milk.

Jill: Right.

Steve: So, we should really, then, use a few more words and that was partly what was wrong with Tony, here. Steve: Also sollten wir wirklich noch ein paar Worte verwenden und das war teilweise das, was mit Tony hier falsch war. Steve : Alors, nous devrions vraiment utiliser quelques mots de plus et c'est en partie ce qui n'allait pas avec Tony, ici. 'I could not eat anything but drink'. "Ich konnte nichts essen als trinken". In a way, he’s a little better; he’s trying. In gewisser Weise ist er ein bisschen besser; er versucht es.

Jill: He’s trying to do that, yeah. Jill: Er versucht das zu tun, ja.

Steve: I could not eat anything. Stop. 'I could only drink milk.' But, of course, it’s not that he could not eat anything. Aber es ist natürlich nicht so, dass er nichts essen könnte. Mais, bien sûr, ce n'est pas qu'il ne pouvait rien manger. 'I could not eat everything', really. "Je ne pouvais pas tout manger", vraiment. Jill: Yeah.

Steve: I could only drink milk and eat some cereal. And, he should probably mention that it’s a very loose cereal. Und er sollte wahrscheinlich erwähnen, dass es ein sehr lockeres Getreide ist. En hij moet waarschijnlijk vermelden dat het een zeer losse ontbijtgranen is. І, напевно, варто згадати, що це дуже пухка крупа. Or, maybe not; cereal is pretty soft.

Jill: Well, once the milk gets in there it softens it up quite a lot. Jill: Nun, sobald die Milch da drin ist, wird sie ziemlich weich. Jill: Pekala, süt bir kez içeri girdiğinde çok fazla yumuşatır. Джилл: Щойно, як тільки молоко потрапляє туди, воно значно пом’якшує його.

Steve: Yeah. And that’s one of those structures where, I mean, we can’t sit here very quickly and come up with the best way of doing it. Und das ist eine dieser Strukturen, in denen wir nicht sehr schnell hier sitzen und den besten Weg finden können, dies zu tun. Et c'est une de ces structures où, je veux dire, nous ne pouvons pas nous asseoir ici très rapidement et trouver la meilleure façon de le faire. But, very often, when you are stuck like that use more words. Aber sehr oft, wenn Sie so festsitzen, verwenden Sie mehr Wörter. Mais, très souvent, lorsque vous êtes coincé comme ça, utilisez plus de mots. Ancak, sık sık, böyle sıkışmış olduğunuzda daha fazla kelime kullanın.

Jill: Use more words, exactly. Make it into two sentences.

Steve: Right.

Jill: Often, people are afraid of that. Jill: Oft haben die Leute Angst davor. They are trying to get all their thoughts into one sentence and sometimes, you know, it’s fine. Sie versuchen, alle ihre Gedanken in einem Satz zusammenzufassen, und manchmal ist es in Ordnung. Ils essaient de mettre toutes leurs pensées en une seule phrase et parfois, vous savez, ça va. Just put a period and then continue on with a new sentence. Mettez simplement un point et continuez avec une nouvelle phrase.

Steve: You know, I think in writing, short sentences are key. Steve: Weißt du, ich denke schriftlich, kurze Sätze sind der Schlüssel. And, the second thing is make sure the meaning is clear. If the meaning is not totally clear to you, if there is any ambiguity, right, -- 'ambiguity' means uncertain meaning, if there is any ambiguity or uncertainty, if it’s not clear to you writing it, it for sure won’t be clear to the person reading it. Wenn Ihnen die Bedeutung nicht ganz klar ist, wenn es eine Mehrdeutigkeit gibt, richtig, - "Mehrdeutigkeit" bedeutet unsichere Bedeutung, wenn es eine Mehrdeutigkeit oder Unsicherheit gibt, wenn es Ihnen beim Schreiben nicht klar ist, wird dies mit Sicherheit nicht der Fall sein Seien Sie der Person, die es liest, klar. Si le sens n'est pas totalement clair pour vous, s'il y a une ambiguïté, n'est-ce pas, -- 'ambiguïté' signifie un sens incertain, s'il y a une ambiguïté ou une incertitude, si ce n'est pas clair pour vous en l'écrivant, ce ne sera certainement pas être clair pour la personne qui le lit. Jill: Right.

Steve: So, it’s always worthwhile to use extra words, make a stop, start a new sentence, make sure it’s clear. Steve: Es lohnt sich also immer, zusätzliche Wörter zu verwenden, anzuhalten, einen neuen Satz zu beginnen und sicherzustellen, dass er klar ist.

Jill: And, you know, a lot of people have that problem. I see it in writing submissions all the time; you know, using a lot of run-on sentences, as we call them. Je le vois en rédigeant des mémoires tout le temps; vous savez, en utilisant beaucoup de phrases continues, comme nous les appelons. 私はいつもそれを書面で見ています。ご存知のように、私たちが呼んでいるように、多くの実行文を使用しています。 Her zaman yazı olarak yazıyorum. Bildiğimiz gibi, çok fazla çalışma cümlesi kullanıyorsunuz. So, you know, they have this thought and it just goes on and on and on in one sentence and then they’re confused and it’s impossible to follow as the reader and now you don’t even know what they’re talking about anymore. Weißt du, sie haben diesen Gedanken und es geht einfach weiter und weiter und weiter in einem Satz und dann sind sie verwirrt und es ist unmöglich, als Leser zu folgen und jetzt weißt du nicht einmal mehr, wovon sie sprechen . Donc, vous savez, ils ont cette pensée et ça continue encore et encore dans une phrase, puis ils sont confus et il est impossible de suivre en tant que lecteur et maintenant vous ne savez même plus de quoi ils parlent . だから、彼らはこの考えを持っていて、それは一文で何度も何度も繰り返され、それから彼らは混乱し、読者としてフォローすることは不可能であり、今あなたは彼らが何について話しているのかさえ知らない。 Отже, ви знаєте, у них є така думка, і вона просто продовжується і продовжується і продовжується в одному реченні, а потім вони плутаються, і неможливо прослідкувати як читач, і тепер ви навіть не знаєте, про що вони говорять . And so, better to have, you know, a few more sentences, but shorter sentences. Ve böylece, daha iyi, bilirsin, birkaç cümle, ama daha kısa cümleler.

Steve: Right.

So, the two last points that I think are quite important in this -- one is the idea of consistency. I couldn’t eat anything but drink milk. Je ne pouvais rien manger d'autre que boire du lait. No, that doesn’t work. You’ve got 'If I couldn’t eat anything except cereal, I could also drink milk. Du hast 'Wenn ich nichts außer Müsli essen könnte, könnte ich auch Milch trinken. Vous avez 'Si je ne pouvais rien manger d'autre que des céréales, je pouvais aussi boire du lait. If you are talking about 'eat', then talk about things that you eat. Si vous parlez de « manger », alors parlez des choses que vous mangez. Jill: food.

Steve: Well, food that you eat; that’s right. If it’s something that you drink, you have to introduce a separate verb to deal with the drinking situation. Wenn es etwas ist, das Sie trinken, müssen Sie ein separates Verb einführen, um mit der Trinksituation umzugehen.

Jill: Or, you could say, I could not eat or drink anything except milk. Jill : Ou, vous pourriez dire, je ne pouvais rien manger ni boire sauf du lait.

Steve: That’s right. Or, I couldn’t consume anything or whatever. Ou, je ne pouvais pas consommer quoi que ce soit ou quoi que ce soit. Або я не міг нічого споживати чи що завгодно. But, if you are using the word 'eat' it implies that you are chewing it. Jill: That’s right.

Steve: We drink liquids. So, one issue here is to be consistent and the other one is to make sure that what you have to say is clear. Don’t be afraid to make more short sentences. Daha kısa cümleler yapmaktan korkma.

Jill: And a couple more important phrases here. Again, he goes on to say 'I went to see the dentist who checked the hurt of my mouth.' Encore une fois, il poursuit en disant "Je suis allé voir le dentiste qui a vérifié la blessure de ma bouche." So, we corrected it and said 'to check the condition of my mouth'. You could say 'to check the pain in my mouth' I think would be more accurate. Vous pourriez dire "pour vérifier la douleur dans ma bouche", je pense que ce serait plus précis. Steve: That’s what I would have put. Steve: Ben de öyle olurdu. Yeah, I think, because Tony is trying to say that he went to the doctor because his mouth was sore. Ouais, je pense, parce que Tony essaie de dire qu'il est allé chez le médecin parce que sa bouche était douloureuse. So, he asked the doctor to check out why his mouth was sore; to check what was causing the pain in his mouth.

Jill: Right.

Then, he said 'The doctor told me that my hurt recovered very well.' Sonra, dedi ki: "Doktor bana acımın çok iyi iyileştiğini söyledi." So, that 'my jaw' recovered very well; that, you know, you could say 'my cut' Steve: I would not have said 'my jaw' just that I had recovered very well. I mean, what we are talking specifically about is the tooth, the roots of the teeth, the gums' it’s just that Tony’s recovered. Jill: Yeah, yeah.

Steve: But, yeah, certainly, I don’t envy Tony and I wouldn’t want to have been him in that situation.

Jill: No.

At the end of his writing submission, actually, he does go on to say, or within it he says, that the dentist had to try many times. It wouldn’t come out, so he had to keep pulling it and so I’m sure that was horrible. Ça ne sortait pas, alors il devait continuer à le tirer et je suis sûr que c'était horrible. And, at the end, Tony goes on to say that the dentist said another wisdom tooth is coming in crookedly or not properly and it’s going to need to be pulled as well. Et, à la fin, Tony poursuit en disant que le dentiste a dit qu'une autre dent de sagesse entre de travers ou pas correctement et qu'elle devra également être retirée. Ve sonunda, Tony, dişçinin başka bir bilgelik dişinin düzgün ya da düzgün bir şekilde gelmediğini ve bunun da çekilmesinin gerekeceğini söylediğini söylemeye devam ediyor. And so, it was, you know, not the news that Tony wanted to hear after that experience. Et donc, ce n'était, vous savez, pas la nouvelle que Tony voulait entendre après cette expérience.

Steve: My advice to Tony: get another dentist.

Jill: Exactly! Get another dentist.

Steve: Get another dentist. The other thing that I would like to ask Tony is, as an experiment when he goes to have his next wisdom tooth pulled, see if he can listen to The Linguist English Content while he’s having his teeth pulled. L'autre chose que je voudrais demander à Tony est, à titre d'expérience lorsqu'il va se faire arracher sa prochaine dent de sagesse, voir s'il peut écouter The Linguist English Content pendant qu'il se fait arracher les dents.

Jill: Maybe it will distract him from the pain. Jill: Belki de onu acıdan uzaklaştırır.

Steve: This is part of our experiment. スティーブ:これは私たちの実験の一部です。 It’s possible that having your teeth pulled stimulates certain neurons in your brain and that might be beneficial for language learning. Il est possible que l'arrachage des dents stimule certains neurones de votre cerveau et que cela soit bénéfique pour l'apprentissage des langues. 歯を抜くと脳内の特定のニューロンが刺激される可能性があり、それは言語学習に役立つ可能性があります。 We can run a little experiment. 少し実験をすることができます。

Jill: A new experiment.

Steve: Okay. Poor Tony; that wasn’t a very pleasant experience, but it was an interesting article. Zavallı Tony; Bu çok hoş bir deneyim değildi, ama ilginç bir yazıydı. Okay, I think that probably we’ve covered it. さて、おそらく私たちはそれをカバーしたと思います。 Tamam, sanırım muhtemelen bunu ele aldık. Гаразд, я думаю, що, ймовірно, ми це висвітлили.

Jill: I think so.

Steve: So, yeah, let’s just say EnglishLingQ.com, that’s us. We have a variety of type of content. We hebben verschillende soorten inhoud. We have easy stories, we have ordinary conversation; some are easy, some are difficult. We hope people enjoy them. We welcome any feedback. If people are members of The Linguist, we would be happy to respond to any requests. If you want us to talk about a particular item in The Linguist Library that you are studying or if you want us to look at some writing samples that you have submitted for correction, we are only too happy to do that. Okay. Thank you.

Jill: See you next time.

Steve: Bye, bye.

Jill: Bye, bye.