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English LingQ Podcast 1.0, Twenty-eight: Mark and Jill Have a Friendly Chat

Twenty-eight: Mark and Jill Have a Friendly Chat

Mark: Hi, everyone.

Welcome back to the EnglishLingQ Podcast; Mark Kaufmann here. Today, Jill and I are going to have another chat about a variety of things. This is natural conversation which, we think, is a very good way of learning a language. First of all, how are you today, Jill?

Jill: I'm well, thank you.

Mark: Oh, I do want to remind everybody to make sure to visit our website at thelinguist.com in order to get the most out of this Podcast by reading it, saving words and phrases and, of course, you know, talking to our tutors, writing, the whole ball of wax, as we say. What's new, Jill?

Jill: Well, it's March 1st and it happens to be snowing outside right now in Vancouver.

Mark: Which makes me happy; I don't know about you. I think you like snow, too.

Jill: I do.

Mark: I don't know what it is. Whenever I see snow falling I get excited.

Jill: Well, I think we may have talked about it when we were talking about skiing in the past; but, just that it's not very often that we get snow in Vancouver and so although this winter we've had a lot more than usual. It's kind of a novelty for us and we usually just get a whole lot of rain and I think the snow is a lot prettier than the rain, so.

Mark: Absolutely; absolutely and I think and, as you say, this winter the weather has been a little cooler than normal, I think; although, I don't know. I mean, the last few years before this year were abnormally warm so maybe everybody's been spoiled; I don't know. But, we usually don't get very much snow so when we get it, yeah, we are definitely excited.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: A lot of people now are grumbling because they're, you know, ah, it's so cold.

Jill: But it's not really that cold. I mean, it's not minus 10 or something.

Mark: No.

Jill: It's pretty close to zero. It's almost, you know, in some areas of the city it is only raining. It's not even cold enough to be snowing, so it's very borderline. And I find that often it feels colder when it's 5 degrees warmer than this and it's raining than it feels right now.

Mark: I agree with you except I really notice the temperature when I'm riding my bike to the office. The last few days have been cooler, but I like it because it's not raining. I much prefer it, as you say. Riding my bike in the rain is less fun. Although riding in the snow is lots of fun.

Jill: So, anyways, yeah, I think March is people typically think of it as the beginning of the spring. We usually, in Vancouver, start having some flowers come up in February, in fact; you know, crocuses, daffodils, those sorts of things. And so, if we get snow or cold weather in March people don't like that very much because spring is supposed to be here.

Mark: And we think we live in the

Jill: the tropics or something

Mark: lotus land portion of Canada when, in fact, actually, we're quite far north.

Jill: It's still Canada.

Mark: That's right.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: What I often think about when we talk about our weather here or doing stuff, especially winter activities, I think about people our members who live in climates where there really is no winter.

Jill: Like Taiwan.

Mark: Yeah, or even the southern U.S. or Australia or Hong Kong, I mean, parts of Japan. There are lots of places that really don't get that cold in the wintertime. I often wonder what they make of our conversations about snow and winter and skiing and probably things that they have very little experience with.

Jill: Right.

Mark: Anyway

Jill: I think we're kind of lucky, actually, that we get to experience different seasons. I really appreciate all different seasons for different reasons. Spring in Vancouver typically is quite rainy, but I like it because there are lots of flowers out. The city just smells beautiful. Everything looks beautiful and fresh; the promise of summer. So, I like spring. Summer, of course, is great with the sun shinning, you know, you can go to the beach, you can sail, you can golf, you can do all the things you want to do. And then fall; the leaves are turning colors. They are beautiful. And then winter with all the rain. Not so great, but, you know, you get the snowy days in there that are kind of neat. I like that we have seasons.

Mark: I agree with you, but I think you may be an optimist. I think there's a lot of people probably that would be quite happy to have nice, sunny, summer days every day.

Jill: Probably; probably.

Mark: It explains why a lot of people from the rest of Canada, especially, but even from Vancouver, spend a significant part of the winter down south like in southern U.S. or places where they get?

Jill: Well, retired people, anyway.

Mark: Retired people. That's right.

Where there's more sunshine and warm weather.

Jill: Right; less winter.

Mark: Less winter, yeah. I think, over time, people get a little tired of the winter. But I agree with you. It's nice to have the changing of the seasons maybe partially because we're used to it; I don't know. That's what we've always had.

Jill: Yeah, that's right.

Mark: Speaking of the weather, though, given that it is a crummy time of year, I know that you are planning on going to South America.

Jill: Central

Mark: Central America in April and I'm going to Hawaii in ten days or so. So, we can't love the weather here that much, I guess.

Jill: Yeah, well, yeah. It's nice to get a break; to have a break.

Mark: It definitely it's a real treat I find to go somewhere warm after, you know, it's been coldish, cold, since October, you know, really. I mean, in October you're not running around in shorts. September is about it for shorts. So, it's been many months now and especially our springs as we've talked about in the past. Our springs here can be

Jill: wet

Mark: cool and wet, really. Like March, it's not uncommon for us to get snow in March and for the mountains to continue to get snow in March. The skiing in March is excellent and, actually, at this time of year instead of going somewhere warm, I'm just as happy to go skiing; both are a treat. But this year we're going to Hawaii, which is going to be great.

Jill: Hawaii is always great. I don't think I've ever met somebody who doesn't love Hawaii who's been there. It's beautiful and they've got, I think, one of the best climates in the world, you know. It's one of those places that is always warm, pretty much. Yeah, they have maybe a rainier season, a rainier time, but it's never cold and I find it doesn't get so hot that you can't bear it. You know, like some places just get so hot and so humid that you don't even want to be outside, whereas even in the middle of summer, yeah, it's very hot, but it's not unbearable.

Mark: No.

I mean, their temperature range -- if you look at it -- their range is, I don't know, 25 to 30. Like that's perfect. I mean, that's you know?

Jill: What else could you ask for?

Mark: What I always say is everyday in Hawaii is like our best day of the year here in Vancouver, you know.

Jill: That's right; that's right.

Mark: It's the same temperature and not humid,

Jill: lots of sun.

Mark: Really lots of sun and, yeah. And, you know, anytime you go somewhere for the sun, you want to be pretty much guaranteed that you're gonna get it. There's nothing worse than going somewhere for the sun and having it rain the whole time.

Jill: That's right.

Mark: It can still happen to you in Hawaii, but rarely, I think.

Jill: I think there are certain months. I do know people who have gone and had quite a lot of rain. So, I think I forget what it is. I think it's sometime in the fall. I think it's maybe October, November, somewhere in and around there where it is a bit rainier. But, you know, I think

Mark: I don't know what we will do there if it rains on us. I guess we'll find stuff to do, but that's not ideal.

Jill: Well, I think it's common, too I went one time, I think in March, and it did rain I think once or twice and poured; it rained very, very hard one time. It was just literally like, I don't know, a foot of water within an hour; it just poured. But, it was a shower and then it was over. It was an hour or two hours long and then it was sunny again and it was nice the rest of the time, so.

Mark: Yeah.

Yeah, I mean, I think you can get a bit of that. I think when we've been in the past we've had a bit of that; but, like you said, you get a brief rain storm and then it clears up and back to the sunshine again, so.

Jill: And it keeps everything in Hawaii lush looking, you know. They definitely get rain, but that's why it's so green; all the flowers. There are so many bright flowers everywhere. It's not like the desert, you know, other hot places where it's so dry that everything is brown and not very pretty.

Mark: Right.

Jill: So, the rain is a good thing.

Mark: Yeah.

Although, there are parts of Hawaii, you know, that are in the rain shadow. Meaning, I think, that they get a lot of rain; I don't know the difference. The rain shadow either means you get a lot of rain or you don't get any. But, they have both sort of types of microclimates in Hawaii where one side of the mountain gets all the rain and the other side doesn't get any.

Jill: Right; that's right.

Mark: But, in general, yeah, you're right. It's very lush and smells great and it's just paradise.

Jill: Yeah.

It's a great place.

Mark: Speaking of great places, you're going away.

Jill: Yeah.

We are going to Central America. So, there are seven countries in Central America and we are going to go to four of them.

Mark: I thought you were going to say and we're going to see them all.

Jill: Well, yeah, we're going to four out of the seven,

Mark: That's pretty good.

Jill: which is still a lot of traveling around; hence, the reason I am only allowed to take one backpack -- not a suitcase -- not more than one backpack.

Mark: I sense a little resentment.

Jill: No, no.

It's just this is how my boyfriend likes to travel. He doesn't like to stay in any one place for too long. He wants to go to a country and see it. He doesn't want to go stay at a resort somewhere and just hangout, which is great. I agree.

I'm glad that we're going to see different places. It's just, yeah; I can't pack as many shoes as I'd like to pack. I can't pack as many clothes as I'd like to pack. You have to be you just have to pick and choose what you take and you can't take too much, which means you're washing things more often; sometimes just hand washing, you know, with soap or shampoo in your hotel. This is what we did last year when we went to China for two and a half weeks. I found that I definitely needed my clothes washed at one point. I just couldn't stand it anymore and they got quite dirty in China. There's a lot of dust and stuff. And so at one hotel there was laundry service. I think a lot of the nicer hotels there's laundry service and so we got it once and it was extremely expensive, of course. Any kind of service like that at a hotel is going to be very expensive, so you don't do it very often.

Mark: No.

You might have been able to find some kind of a laundry.

Jill: Laundromat.

Mark: Laundromat, I don't know, but some kind of a laundry service. Presumably, they have them. I'm sure the locals don't go get their laundry done at the hotel, if they're not going to do it themselves.

Jill: No.

But, yeah; so, we'll be going to Costa Rica, Honduras, Guatemala and Belize, so. And Belize is on the Caribbean, you know.

Mark: Yeah, I've heard it's really nice.

Jill: Beautiful, balmy weather; big barrier reef there; great diving, snorkeling, sport fishing and all sorts of things. In Costa Rica, of course, the rain forest, the cloud forest, lots of surfing, jungle hikes. You know, we'll see monkeys and snakes and God knows what else.

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: I'm a little scared to tell you the truth. But, yeah, it should be very interesting.

Mark: That will be fun. I mean, I know it's, I think'my wife and I used to do more of that kind of traveling before we had kids.

Jill: Yeah, of course.

Mark: And now with kids, we, yeah, kids aren't so keen on being dragged around everywhere.

Jill: No.

You've got to do the cushy kind of stuff, I guess.

Mark: So, especially when they are not that old they really don't appreciate any of that.

Jill: No.

Mark: But, yeah, it's fun to go and see and do a whole bunch of different things and really see a lot of wherever you go.

Jill: Be active and be immersed in the culture.

Mark: Yeah.

Even in Hawaii this time I think we'll try and do a few more things because the kids are a little older.

Jill: Yeah.

Yeah, there's some nice like waterfall hikes that aren't too difficult that you can do.

Mark: Exactly. Go and try and do some hikes and, yeah. In Maui, where we are going to be, there's one side of the island that's a lot more lush because it gets a lot more rain and there's a really windy road to it. But, apparently, there are lots of neat, little pools and falls and hikes and stuff. So, we'll try to do that, I think.

Jill: Although, you know, kids are always so happy just being by a pool or at the beach, 24/7.

Mark: You know, they're happiest. You drag them off somewhere, especially if it's not on the water, then all of a sudden it feels a lot hotter and they're seeing something they don't really care about

Jill: That's right.

Mark: wondering why we just didn't stay by the pool.

Jill: That's right.

Mark: But, on the other hand, we're there, too. So, we like to go do a few different things and it will be good. But, your trip sounds like it will be great.

Jill: Yeah, I hope so. It will be. I know it will be. I'm a little worried because we're not really planning where we are going to stay other than we first arrive there the first four nights. After that, it's just we're sort of winging it. We don't really want to have a schedule we have to stick to. So, we'll stay in Costa Rica for however long we want and then we'll move on. We've got a general idea of how long we want to spend in each place to see the things we want to see. But, you know, we could end up wanting to stay one place a day longer or a day less or whatever. So, we're not booking hotels or anything in advance and this is how Chris always has traveled. He likes that. He likes spontaneity. He's not big on rigid schedules. He just wants to do what he wants to do, which is fine with me; except for, that I just worry. It's a busy time of year there. April is the best month. March and April are the best months in Central America for weather; January to April. But, March and April, in particular and then it's also Easter. And so, I'm just a little bit worried that in some of the more touristy places like Belize, for example, there might not be a lot available. And I'm just worried that we'll end up being in some, I don't know what,

Mark: cockroach infested

Jill: bog infested hammock somewhere. I don't know.

So, on the beach' Mark: Yeah, but that's all part of the journey.

Jill: Well, that's what he tries to tell me!

Mark: As you're camping out on the beach in a rain storm because there are no hotel rooms available.

Jill: You know, you look back on it and can laugh; but, at the time, it's not so funny.

Mark: It's not funny at all.

Jill: No, no, it's true. Those make the best memories; the best stories. But, at the time, you're just cursing every minute.

Mark: Right.

Jill: So, I'm just worried that might happen. But, I guess, you know, it's not that big a deal. It's not the end of the world.

Mark: Well, I guess you'll always find somewhere to sleep, theoretically. At least it's not cold there.

Jill: That's right.

That's what he says. He says, I mean, if there ends up being only a very expensive place that has rooms left then, you know, it's not like we don't want to spend that kind of money, but it's not like we can't. It's not like if we had no other option we couldn't.

Mark: Right.

Jill: By the same token, if there are only crappy places available then, I guess,

Mark: there's only crappy places available.

Jill: That's right and you've just got to deal with it.

Mark: Yup. Oh well, hopefully, it all goes smoothly. If not, as you say, we'll be treated to some great stories, I am sure, when you get back.

Jill: Well, it was funny. I was talking to my friend the other night about the trip and I was telling her when we get to Costa Rica what we're gonna do and go for some hikes in the rain forest and I was so excited about this. It is going to be so beautiful and seeing different, you know, trees and animals and stuff that you would never see here. I thought it just sounded awesome and I'm so excited and all she could say was you couldn't pay me any amount of money to go hiking in the rain forest in the jungle. That's how she feels. That the thought of hiking through forests where there is snakes, tarantulas, whatever,

Mark: who knows what kind of bugs and

Jill: which I hate just as much as the next person; probably more than a lot of people, but, I guess, the positives outweigh that for me.

Mark: Right.

Jill: But, yeah, she just couldn't believe it. It was just not something she would ever be interested in doing.

Mark: Right.

Jill: So, it's just different strokes.

Mark: Yeah, and I guess it depends. I think there is probably different levels of rain forest in terms of I don't know, maybe not. I mean, presumably, rain forest sounds like you're in the middle of, yeah, the jungle. I always picture the rain forest in Brazil where you've got these, you know, the natives.

Jill: Picture the Amazon.

Mark: The natives with the, whatever, piece of bone through their nose and

Jill: Very stereotypical view of the rain forest, I think.

Mark: I just picture that kind of a rain forest being somewhere, yeah, where there's snakes and, I don't know what manner of bugs and piranhas and I don?t know what and thinking, ooohhh. But, probably, like all these things because we have no experience in that environment it just sounds like ah, you know, not just

Jill: .so foreign

Mark: the end of the world. I mean, it's so foreign. I mean, I think, I would imagine that people there if you told them they could come here and wander through the forest and there's bears and cougars and whatever, other things, I mean, there's all kinds of animals in the woods.

Jill: And we go in our forests all the time and don't think anything of it.

Mark: I think, probably, the worst thing in the rain forest, assuming you're not bitten by a poisonous snake, which, I'm sure, doesn't happen that often.

Jill: No.

Mark: Probably, the worst thing will be bugs just like here in the woods. The bugs are a nuisance.

Jill: Mosquitoes and things like that, yeah.

Mark: I mean, we're used to that here, so.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: I mean, it will be neat.

Jill: I mean, it's become a touristy thing to do now anyway. So, I mean, they have guided tours; there's trails. It's not like you're bushwhacking through the jungle and breaking trail and camping out, you know.

Mark: Although, that would be fun, too.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: Pith helmet with your machete.

Jill: No, I'm not into that, but, yeah, I think, you know, generally now, you go as a group with people who know the area, know what they're doing; there are proper supplies. I think it's fairly safe.

Mark: And are you going to do this thing I've seen this thing they show on TV. They've got the platforms up in the treetops with the zip line between the platforms.

Jill: Yeah.

You know, I don't think so because it's very expensive.

Mark: Oh, it is aye

Jill: Aye and I don't it's not that big of a thrill. I've read about it in Costa Rica and I've read lots of what people have said and said yeah, it's definitely not worth the money. It doesn't take very long and it's not one of the most spectacular areas, you know, and Chris has done things so much more exciting than that in places that are so much more I don't know what the word is, but just that just doesn't really appeal to him and to me it just doesn't appeal because I don't even like heights. So, I don't want to be dangling from something over a gorge or whatever.

Mark: The zip line part of it doesn't appeal to me either, but maybe, being up that high up in the tree would be neat, I don't know.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: Supposedly, you see all kinds of different wildlife up there that you wouldn't normally see, but.

Jill: Yeah and I've read things too and maybe that's true, sometimes you do. But I've read other people who've said no, it was a disappointment and I didn't see anything that special so, who knows.

Mark: And, of course, with any trip there's always a range of options; a range of things you can do, some more expensive than others, and you have to figure out the ones that are worth doing.

Jill: That's right.

Mark: You know, so much of being in a different place is achieved or, at least, you get a lot or the most out of it just by being there, just by meeting with the locals, eating what they eat, seeing what they do, you know. You don't have to be doing some kind of super adventure trip, whatever. You know, just by being there and seeing how people how they live in their part of the world is so interesting.

Jill: An adventure in and of itself.

Mark: Yeah, exactly.

Jill: Yeah, just being somewhere totally different. It's a foreign language, different food. Although, Central America, I mean, they eat a lot of chicken and rice, just like in South America. It's not like it's food that's extremely different than we would encounter here.

Mark: Right.

Jill: But, still, yeah, of course, the customs are going to be different, the language, definitely the weather.

Mark: And just what the country's like. You just don't know what a country's like. You don't have a feel for it at all until you actually go there. And just how they live, what their houses are like, what cars they drive, how they dress, how they talk, what they eat, what hours they keep. I mean, it's just sort of the flavor of a place that you just can't imagine without going there.

Jill: Yeah, that's right.

Mark: Like, I've never been to South America or Central America or Mexico for that matter. So, I have an image in my mind of what those places are like, but I'm sure it's a far cry and they are all, obviously, probably quite different from each other. But, I should go. Costa Rica I have a grandmother from Costa Rica.

Jill: That's right.

Your mom's mom is Costa Rican.

Mark: Yeah, so I think I have family there, actually.

Jill: Well, yeah, I would imagine. Has your mom ever been?

Mark: I think my mom might have been once, yeah.

Jill: Well, it's really become quite a popular place.

Mark: Yeah, it has.

Jill: I mean, I have a friend who started going there a few years ago with her family and they ended up buying a couple of places there. It's become quite lucrative. People are buying up land. My boyfriend's sister, about five years ago, bought some land there with some other people and it's just skyrocketed.

Mark: Land or with, in fact, a house on it?

Jill: No, they just bought land and they are going to build on it and then rent it out and go and stay there for a month out of the year and rent it out the rest of the time.

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: So, real estate there has really been going up as a lot of foreigners are coming in.

Mark: And how can I ask how you get there? Like, do you have to fly to Miami?

Jill: We are going from Vancouver. We have a fairly direct flight. It goes from Vancouver to Houston and then from Houston right to San Jose the capital of Costa Rica.

Mark: Right.

Jill: The other option from Vancouver is through L.A. So, Vancouver to L.A. to Costa Rica, but that was going to actually take longer. I can't remember for what reason, but maybe the layover was longer. There was just something about it that wasn't as good, so we went the Houston route. So, yeah, it's a three-hour layover in Houston then you get to Costa Rica. And San Jose there's two airports there Liberia and San Jose. Most people or the area of Costa Rica that is the most famous for the surf, so where most people would probably want to go, is sort of a little is obviously on the coast and a little further south not in the northern part, so it's actually a five-hour drive from San Jose.

Mark: From the airport.

Jill: Or you can catch -- which we are going to do -- another half-hour flight down there for like $75.00 a person to get to the actual

Mark: on Air Costa Rica?

Jill: I don't know what the airline is. It takes you to, I guess, Tambour, which I'm not sure if that's the name of a city or more the name of a province, a region. I'm not quite sure. But then that's sort of where everybody then catches a taxi -- another 50 minute taxi ride -- to their different hotels and whatnot.

Mark: I'm sure you'll give us a geography report when you come back.

Jill: Yes. I think it's quite a production to get there.

Mark: Well, sure.

Jill: It's going to take a long time.

Mark: From here to Houston is probably four hours.

Jill: Yeah, I think it's about four hours.

Mark: And then from Houston down there.

Jill: It's not very far, actually. If it was a direct flight from here to Costa Rica, it would have only been something like eight hours.

Mark: Okay.

Jill: Like it's seven or eight hours, but because there's a three and a half hour layover

Mark: it's still pretty far.

Jill: Yeah, it is. Yeah, it's like going to Europe or something.

Mark: That's right.

Jill: But, because there's that layover and then when we get to San Jose we have a layover for an hour and a half, then we get on another flight and then we have to get a taxi. So, all in all, it's going to end up being about probably a 14-hour day.

Mark: At least. By the time you, you know, you get up, get to the airport early and everything, by the time you roll into your hotel it's probably longer, yeah.

Jill: Like 15 hours, yeah.

Mark: You'll be happy to hit the bed. Hit the sheets.

Jill: Hit the hay, yeah.

Mark: Yeah, well, that will be good.

Jill: The good thing is it's only a two-hour time difference. It's two hours ahead.

Mark: That's nice. That makes a big difference, you know.

Jill: A big difference.

Mark: Even with us going to Hawaii'I don't know what the time difference is, but it's two or three hours or whatever it is.

Jill: It's behind two hours.

Mark: It's not that big a deal; whereas, if you go to Europe or you go to Asia the time difference really takes it out of you for a few days.

Jill: Yeah, it really does.

Mark: So, it is. It's kind of nice not to have to worry about that when you are only talking about two-three hours time difference.

Jill: Yeah, yeah and coming home it's very hard also. You're so tired coming home and then you've got to adjust. But, two hours is really not that big a deal.

Mark: No.

Jill: You know, in one day you'll be adjusted to their clock and it will be fine.

Mark: Exactly. I think I've heard people say it's basically a day per hour of time difference that it takes you to recover. I think that's probably fairly accurate.

Jill: Yeah, I agree.

Mark: So, yeah, that is convenient, yeah. I should really get down there some day.

Jill: Well, there's lots of time. Maybe when the kids are a little bit older and they, you know -- teenagers even -- so that they would actually sort of appreciate some of the jungle experience. I mean, to me, personally, to go somewhere like that if you're just going to go to sit on the beach, which a lot of people do and, I guess, that's fine for them, but for me personally if I'm going to do that I'm going to go to Hawaii. Why am I going to go to Central America where there's such a variety in culture, history, language -- it's so different -- just to go sit at a resort on a beach. To me, that doesn't make a lot of sense.

Mark: No.

Jill: If you are going to go somewhere like that to get the cultural experience out of it and to go to the rain forest and to do all of those things. So, if you've got small kids where you are probably not going to be able to do those things and you're going to spend a whole lot of money to get there.

Mark: Right.

Well, that's the thing. They don't appreciate, as you say any of the cultural experiences they don't appreciate at all, really.

Jill: No, no.

Mark: They know what they know and they know that they like it nice and hot and they like it in the pool and that's all they need. So, yeah, like you say, to go somewhere exotic is going to be more expensive and more of an ordeal getting there, more difficult when you are there and, you know, yeah, we might enjoy it a little more, although not necessarily if everybody else isn't enjoying it.

Jill: Yeah, that's right.

Mark: Yeah.

So, I agree. Probably as we get older we will definitely start to go. You know, we should go to Europe, we should go to Asia, go to Latin America, South America, different places to see things, but not until the kids are old enough to appreciate it as a group.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: Because they you know, everybody's plane ticket costs pretty much the same.

Jill: Yeah, that's right.

It's expensive.

Mark: It's expensive, yeah, but well worth it. Anyway, I think that's probably good. Just want to remind everyone again to come visit our website and I know we look forward to hearing a report from Jill on her adventures after she gets back.


Twenty-eight: Mark and Jill Have a Friendly Chat

Mark: Hi, everyone. Mark: Hola a todos.

Welcome back to the EnglishLingQ Podcast; Mark Kaufmann here. Today, Jill and I are going to have another chat about a variety of things. Hoje, Jill e eu vamos ter outra conversa sobre uma variedade de coisas. This is natural conversation which, we think, is a very good way of learning a language. Esta es una conversación natural que, creemos, es una muy buena forma de aprender un idioma. First of all, how are you today, Jill?

Jill: I’m well, thank you.

Mark: Oh, I do want to remind everybody to make sure to visit our website at thelinguist.com in order to get the most out of this Podcast by reading it, saving words and phrases and, of course, you know, talking to our tutors, writing, the whole ball of wax, as we say. Mark: Ah, eu quero lembrar a todos para se certificar de visitar o nosso site em thelinguist.com, a fim de tirar o máximo proveito deste Podcast lendo-o, salvando palavras e frases e, claro, você sabe, falando com o nosso tutores, escrevendo, toda a bola de cera, como dizemos. 马克:哦,我确实想提醒大家一定要访问我们的网站 thelinguist.com,以便通过阅读、保存单词和短语以及当然,与我们的交谈来充分利用此播客导师,写作,整个蜡球,正如我们所说。 What’s new, Jill? ¿Qué hay de nuevo, Jill?

Jill: Well, it’s March 1st and it happens to be snowing outside right now in Vancouver. Jill: Bueno, es el 1 de marzo y ahora mismo está nevando afuera en Vancouver.

Mark: Which makes me happy; I don’t know about you. I think you like snow, too.

Jill: I do. Jill: lo hago.

Mark: I don’t know what it is. Whenever I see snow falling I get excited. Sempre que vejo neve caindo, fico animado.

Jill: Well, I think we may have talked about it when we were talking about skiing in the past; but, just that it’s not very often that we get snow in Vancouver and so although this winter we’ve had a lot more than usual. It’s kind of a novelty for us and we usually just get a whole lot of rain and I think the snow is a lot prettier than the rain, so. Es una especie de novedad para nosotros y normalmente llueve mucho y creo que la nieve es mucho más bonita que la lluvia.

Mark: Absolutely; absolutely and I think and, as you say, this winter the weather has been a little cooler than normal, I think; although, I don’t know. Mark: Absolutamente; absolutamente y creo y, como dices, este invierno el clima ha sido un poco más fresco de lo normal, creo; aunque no lo sé. I mean, the last few years before this year were abnormally warm so maybe everybody’s been spoiled; I don’t know. Quiero decir, los últimos años antes de este año fueron anormalmente cálidos, así que tal vez todos hayan sido mimados; No lo sé. Je veux dire, les dernières années avant cette année ont été anormalement chaudes alors peut-être que tout le monde a été gâté ; Je ne sais pas. But, we usually don’t get very much snow so when we get it, yeah, we are definitely excited.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: A lot of people now are grumbling because they’re, you know, ah, it’s so cold. Mark : Beaucoup de gens grognent maintenant parce qu'ils sont, vous savez, ah, il fait si froid.

Jill: But it’s not really that cold. Jill: Mas não é realmente tão frio. I mean, it’s not minus 10 or something. Quer dizer, não é menos 10 ou algo assim.

Mark: No.

Jill: It’s pretty close to zero. It’s almost, you know, in some areas of the city it is only raining. C'est presque, vous savez, dans certains quartiers de la ville il ne fait que pleuvoir. It’s not even cold enough to be snowing, so it’s very borderline. Ni siquiera hace suficiente frío para nevar, por lo que está muy al límite. Il ne fait même pas assez froid pour neiger, donc c'est très limite. Het is niet eens koud genoeg om te sneeuwen, dus het is erg borderline. And I find that often it feels colder when it’s 5 degrees warmer than this and it’s raining than it feels right now. Et je trouve que souvent il fait plus froid quand il fait 5 degrés de plus que cela et qu'il pleut plus qu'il ne le semble en ce moment.

Mark: I agree with you except I really notice the temperature when I’m riding my bike to the office. Mark : Je suis d'accord avec toi sauf que je remarque vraiment la température quand je fais du vélo pour aller au bureau. The last few days have been cooler, but I like it because it’s not raining. I much prefer it, as you say. Riding my bike in the rain is less fun. Although riding in the snow is lots of fun. Bien que rouler dans la neige soit très amusant.

Jill: So, anyways, yeah, I think March is people typically think of it as the beginning of the spring. Jill : Donc, de toute façon, oui, je pense que mars est généralement considéré comme le début du printemps. We usually, in Vancouver, start having some flowers come up in February, in fact; you know, crocuses, daffodils, those sorts of things. Generalmente, en Vancouver, comenzamos a tener algunas flores en febrero, de hecho; ya sabes, azafranes, narcisos, ese tipo de cosas. And so, if we get snow or cold weather in March people don’t like that very much because spring is supposed to be here. Et donc, s'il neige ou qu'il fait froid en mars, les gens n'aiment pas beaucoup parce que le printemps est censé être là.

Mark: And we think we live in the Mark : Et nous pensons que nous vivons dans le

Jill: the tropics or something Jill : les tropiques ou quelque chose comme ça

Mark: lotus land portion of Canada when, in fact, actually, we’re quite far north. Mark : une portion de terre de lotus du Canada alors qu'en fait, en fait, nous sommes assez loin au nord. Марк: частина землі лотоса в Канаді, коли, насправді, ми знаходимося досить далеко на північ. 马克:加拿大的莲花土地部分,事实上,实际上,我们在很远的北方。

Jill: It’s still Canada.

Mark: That’s right.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: What I often think about when we talk about our weather here or doing stuff, especially winter activities, I think about people our members who live in climates where there really is no winter.

Jill: Like Taiwan.

Mark: Yeah, or even the southern U.S. or Australia or Hong Kong, I mean, parts of Japan. There are lots of places that really don’t get that cold in the wintertime. I often wonder what they make of our conversations about snow and winter and skiing and probably things that they have very little experience with.

Jill: Right.

Mark: Anyway

Jill: I think we’re kind of lucky, actually, that we get to experience different seasons. I really appreciate all different seasons for different reasons. Spring in Vancouver typically is quite rainy, but I like it because there are lots of flowers out. The city just smells beautiful. Everything looks beautiful and fresh; the promise of summer. So, I like spring. Summer, of course, is great with the sun shinning, you know, you can go to the beach, you can sail, you can golf, you can do all the things you want to do. And then fall; the leaves are turning colors. They are beautiful. And then winter with all the rain. Not so great, but, you know, you get the snowy days in there that are kind of neat. No es tan bueno, pero, ya sabes, tienes los días de nieve allí que son algo agradables. Pas si génial, mais, vous savez, vous avez des journées enneigées là-dedans qui sont plutôt chouette. Не так чудово, але, знаєте, у вас там сніжні дні є якісь охайні. I like that we have seasons.

Mark: I agree with you, but I think you may be an optimist. I think there’s a lot of people probably that would be quite happy to have nice, sunny, summer days every day.

Jill: Probably; probably.

Mark: It explains why a lot of people from the rest of Canada, especially, but even from Vancouver, spend a significant part of the winter down south like in southern U.S. or places where they get?

Jill: Well, retired people, anyway.

Mark: Retired people. That’s right.

Where there’s more sunshine and warm weather.

Jill: Right; less winter.

Mark: Less winter, yeah. I think, over time, people get a little tired of the winter. But I agree with you. It’s nice to have the changing of the seasons maybe partially because we’re used to it; I don’t know. C'est agréable d'avoir le changement des saisons peut-être en partie parce que nous y sommes habitués ; Je ne sais pas. That’s what we’ve always had.

Jill: Yeah, that’s right.

Mark: Speaking of the weather, though, given that it is a crummy time of year, I know that you are planning on going to South America.

Jill: Central

Mark: Central America in April and I’m going to Hawaii in ten days or so. Mark : Amérique centrale en avril et je vais à Hawaï dans une dizaine de jours. So, we can’t love the weather here that much, I guess. Donc, nous ne pouvons pas tant aimer le temps ici, je suppose.

Jill: Yeah, well, yeah. It’s nice to get a break; to have a break.

Mark: It definitely it’s a real treat I find to go somewhere warm after, you know, it’s been coldish, cold, since October, you know, really. I mean, in October you’re not running around in shorts. Je veux dire, en octobre, tu ne cours pas en short. September is about it for shorts. Septembre est à peu près tout pour les courts métrages. So, it’s been many months now and especially our springs as we’ve talked about in the past. Alors, ça fait plusieurs mois maintenant et surtout nos ressorts dont on vous parlait par le passé. Our springs here can be

Jill: wet

Mark: cool and wet, really. Like March, it’s not uncommon for us to get snow in March and for the mountains to continue to get snow in March. The skiing in March is excellent and, actually, at this time of year instead of going somewhere warm, I’m just as happy to go skiing; both are a treat. But this year we’re going to Hawaii, which is going to be great.

Jill: Hawaii is always great. I don’t think I’ve ever met somebody who doesn’t love Hawaii who’s been there. It’s beautiful and they’ve got, I think, one of the best climates in the world, you know. It’s one of those places that is always warm, pretty much. Yeah, they have maybe a rainier season, a rainier time, but it’s never cold and I find it doesn’t get so hot that you can’t bear it. Так, у них може бути сезон дощів, більш дощовий час, але ніколи не буває холодно, і я вважаю, що не стає настільки спекотно, щоб ви не витримали. You know, like some places just get so hot and so humid that you don’t even want to be outside, whereas even in the middle of summer, yeah, it’s very hot, but it’s not unbearable.

Mark: No.

I mean, their temperature range -- if you look at it -- their range is, I don’t know, 25 to 30. Like that’s perfect. I mean, that’s you know?

Jill: What else could you ask for?

Mark: What I always say is everyday in Hawaii is like our best day of the year here in Vancouver, you know.

Jill: That’s right; that’s right.

Mark: It’s the same temperature and not humid,

Jill: lots of sun.

Mark: Really lots of sun and, yeah. And, you know, anytime you go somewhere for the sun, you want to be pretty much guaranteed that you’re gonna get it. Et, vous savez, chaque fois que vous allez quelque part pour le soleil, vous voulez être à peu près assuré que vous l'obtiendrez. There’s nothing worse than going somewhere for the sun and having it rain the whole time.

Jill: That’s right.

Mark: It can still happen to you in Hawaii, but rarely, I think.

Jill: I think there are certain months. I do know people who have gone and had quite a lot of rain. So, I think I forget what it is. Donc, je pense que j'oublie ce que c'est. I think it’s sometime in the fall. I think it’s maybe October, November, somewhere in and around there where it is a bit rainier. But, you know, I think

Mark: I don’t know what we will do there if it rains on us. Mark : Je ne sais pas ce que nous ferons là-bas s'il pleut sur nous. I guess we’ll find stuff to do, but that’s not ideal.

Jill: Well, I think it’s common, too I went one time, I think in March, and it did rain I think once or twice and poured; it rained very, very hard one time. Джилл: Ну, я думаю, що це звичайне явище, я теж був один раз, я думаю, у березні, і був дощ, думаю, раз чи двічі і пролив; один раз йшов дуже, дуже сильний дощ. It was just literally like, I don’t know, a foot of water within an hour; it just poured. But, it was a shower and then it was over. It was an hour or two hours long and then it was sunny again and it was nice the rest of the time, so.

Mark: Yeah.

Yeah, I mean, I think you can get a bit of that. I think when we’ve been in the past we’ve had a bit of that; but, like you said, you get a brief rain storm and then it clears up and back to the sunshine again, so.

Jill: And it keeps everything in Hawaii lush looking, you know. 吉尔:它让夏威夷的一切看起来都郁郁葱葱,你知道的。 They definitely get rain, but that’s why it’s so green; all the flowers. There are so many bright flowers everywhere. It’s not like the desert, you know, other hot places where it’s so dry that everything is brown and not very pretty.

Mark: Right.

Jill: So, the rain is a good thing.

Mark: Yeah.

Although, there are parts of Hawaii, you know, that are in the rain shadow. Bien qu'il y ait des parties d'Hawaï, vous savez, qui sont à l'ombre de la pluie. Хоча, ви знаєте, є частини Гаваїв, які знаходяться в тіні дощу. Meaning, I think, that they get a lot of rain; I don’t know the difference. The rain shadow either means you get a lot of rain or you don’t get any. L'ombre de la pluie signifie soit que vous avez beaucoup de pluie, soit que vous n'en avez pas. Тінь від дощу або означає, що ви отримуєте багато дощу, або не отримуєте жодного. But, they have both sort of types of microclimates in Hawaii where one side of the mountain gets all the rain and the other side doesn’t get any. Aber sie haben beide Arten von Mikroklima in Hawaii, wo eine Seite des Berges den ganzen Regen bekommt und die andere Seite keine.

Jill: Right; that’s right.

Mark: But, in general, yeah, you’re right. It’s very lush and smells great and it’s just paradise.

Jill: Yeah.

It’s a great place.

Mark: Speaking of great places, you’re going away.

Jill: Yeah.

We are going to Central America. So, there are seven countries in Central America and we are going to go to four of them. Donc, il y a sept pays en Amérique centrale et nous allons nous rendre dans quatre d'entre eux.

Mark: I thought you were going to say and we’re going to see them all. Mark : Je pensais que tu allais dire et nous allons tous les voir. Марк: Я думав, ти скажеш, і ми їх усіх побачимо.

Jill: Well, yeah, we’re going to four out of the seven,

Mark: That’s pretty good.

Jill: which is still a lot of traveling around; hence, the reason I am only allowed to take one backpack -- not a suitcase -- not more than one backpack. Jill : qui voyage encore beaucoup ; par conséquent, la raison pour laquelle je ne suis autorisé à prendre qu'un seul sac à dos - pas une valise - pas plus d'un sac à dos.

Mark: I sense a little resentment. Mark : Je sens un peu de ressentiment.

Jill: No, no.

It’s just this is how my boyfriend likes to travel. He doesn’t like to stay in any one place for too long. He wants to go to a country and see it. He doesn’t want to go stay at a resort somewhere and just hangout, which is great. Il ne veut pas rester quelque part dans un complexe et juste passer du temps, ce qui est génial. I agree.

I’m glad that we’re going to see different places. It’s just, yeah; I can’t pack as many shoes as I’d like to pack. C'est juste, ouais; Je ne peux pas emporter autant de chaussures que je le voudrais. I can’t pack as many clothes as I’d like to pack. You have to be you just have to pick and choose what you take and you can’t take too much, which means you’re washing things more often; sometimes just hand washing, you know, with soap or shampoo in your hotel. This is what we did last year when we went to China for two and a half weeks. I found that I definitely needed my clothes washed at one point. J'ai trouvé que j'avais vraiment besoin que mes vêtements soient lavés à un moment donné. I just couldn’t stand it anymore and they got quite dirty in China. Je ne pouvais plus le supporter et ils sont devenus assez sales en Chine. There’s a lot of dust and stuff. Il y a beaucoup de poussière et d'autres choses. And so at one hotel there was laundry service. I think a lot of the nicer hotels there’s laundry service and so we got it once and it was extremely expensive, of course. Je pense que beaucoup d'hôtels plus agréables ont un service de blanchisserie et nous l'avons eu une fois et c'était extrêmement cher, bien sûr. Any kind of service like that at a hotel is going to be very expensive, so you don’t do it very often.

Mark: No.

You might have been able to find some kind of a laundry. Vous avez peut-être pu trouver une sorte de laverie.

Jill: Laundromat.

Mark: Laundromat, I don’t know, but some kind of a laundry service. Presumably, they have them. I’m sure the locals don’t go get their laundry done at the hotel, if they’re not going to do it themselves.

Jill: No.

But, yeah; so, we’ll be going to Costa Rica, Honduras, Guatemala and Belize, so. And Belize is on the Caribbean, you know.

Mark: Yeah, I’ve heard it’s really nice.

Jill: Beautiful, balmy weather; big barrier reef there; great diving, snorkeling, sport fishing and all sorts of things. In Costa Rica, of course, the rain forest, the cloud forest, lots of surfing, jungle hikes. You know, we’ll see monkeys and snakes and God knows what else.

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: I’m a little scared to tell you the truth. But, yeah, it should be very interesting.

Mark: That will be fun. I mean, I know it’s, I think’my wife and I used to do more of that kind of traveling before we had kids. Je veux dire, je sais que c'est, je pense que ma femme et moi avions l'habitude de faire plus de ce genre de voyages avant d'avoir des enfants.

Jill: Yeah, of course.

Mark: And now with kids, we, yeah, kids aren’t so keen on being dragged around everywhere. Mark : Et maintenant, avec les enfants, nous, ouais, les enfants n'aimons pas trop être traînés partout.

Jill: No.

You’ve got to do the cushy kind of stuff, I guess. Vous devez faire le genre de choses pépères, je suppose. Je moet het zachte soort dingen doen, denk ik.

Mark: So, especially when they are not that old they really don’t appreciate any of that.

Jill: No.

Mark: But, yeah, it’s fun to go and see and do a whole bunch of different things and really see a lot of wherever you go. Mark : Mais, oui, c'est amusant d'aller voir et de faire tout un tas de choses différentes et de vraiment voir beaucoup de choses partout où vous allez.

Jill: Be active and be immersed in the culture.

Mark: Yeah.

Even in Hawaii this time I think we’ll try and do a few more things because the kids are a little older.

Jill: Yeah.

Yeah, there’s some nice like waterfall hikes that aren’t too difficult that you can do.

Mark: Exactly. Go and try and do some hikes and, yeah. In Maui, where we are going to be, there’s one side of the island that’s a lot more lush because it gets a lot more rain and there’s a really windy road to it. But, apparently, there are lots of neat, little pools and falls and hikes and stuff. Mais, apparemment, il y a beaucoup de petites piscines et de chutes et de randonnées et tout. So, we’ll try to do that, I think.

Jill: Although, you know, kids are always so happy just being by a pool or at the beach, 24/7. Jill : Même si, vous savez, les enfants sont toujours si heureux d'être au bord d'une piscine ou à la plage, 24h/24 et 7j/7.

Mark: You know, they’re happiest. You drag them off somewhere, especially if it’s not on the water, then all of a sudden it feels a lot hotter and they’re seeing something they don’t really care about Vous les traînez quelque part, surtout si ce n'est pas sur l'eau, puis tout d'un coup il fait beaucoup plus chaud et ils voient quelque chose dont ils ne se soucient pas vraiment

Jill: That’s right.

Mark: wondering why we just didn’t stay by the pool. Mark : je me demande pourquoi nous ne sommes pas restés au bord de la piscine.

Jill: That’s right.

Mark: But, on the other hand, we’re there, too. Mark : Mais, d'un autre côté, nous sommes là aussi. So, we like to go do a few different things and it will be good. But, your trip sounds like it will be great. Mais, votre voyage semble être génial.

Jill: Yeah, I hope so. It will be. I know it will be. I’m a little worried because we’re not really planning where we are going to stay other than we first arrive there the first four nights. Je suis un peu inquiet car nous ne prévoyons pas vraiment où nous allons rester à part que nous y arrivons les quatre premières nuits. After that, it’s just we’re sort of winging it. We don’t really want to have a schedule we have to stick to. So, we’ll stay in Costa Rica for however long we want and then we’ll move on. We’ve got a general idea of how long we want to spend in each place to see the things we want to see. But, you know, we could end up wanting to stay one place a day longer or a day less or whatever. Mais, vous savez, nous pourrions finir par vouloir rester à un endroit un jour de plus ou un jour de moins ou quoi que ce soit. So, we’re not booking hotels or anything in advance and this is how Chris always has traveled. He likes that. He likes spontaneity. He’s not big on rigid schedules. Er hat keine großen Zeitpläne. He just wants to do what he wants to do, which is fine with me; except for, that I just worry. Er will nur tun, was er tun will, was für mich in Ordnung ist; außer dass ich mir nur Sorgen mache. It’s a busy time of year there. April is the best month. March and April are the best months in Central America for weather; January to April. But, March and April, in particular and then it’s also Easter. And so, I’m just a little bit worried that in some of the more touristy places like Belize, for example, there might not be a lot available. 因此,我只是有点担心,例如在伯利兹这样的旅游胜地,可能没有很多可用的地方。 And I’m just worried that we’ll end up being in some, I don’t know what, Et j'ai juste peur qu'on finisse par être dans certains, je ne sais pas quoi,

Mark: cockroach infested

Jill: bog infested hammock somewhere. Jill : hamac infesté de marais quelque part. Джилл: десь завалений болотами гамак. 吉尔:某处沼泽出没的吊床。 I don’t know.

So, on the beach' Mark: Yeah, but that’s all part of the journey.

Jill: Well, that’s what he tries to tell me!

Mark: As you’re camping out on the beach in a rain storm because there are no hotel rooms available. Mark : Pendant que vous campez sur la plage sous une tempête de pluie, car il n'y a pas de chambres d'hôtel disponibles.

Jill: You know, you look back on it and can laugh; but, at the time, it’s not so funny.

Mark: It’s not funny at all.

Jill: No, no, it’s true. Those make the best memories; the best stories. But, at the time, you’re just cursing every minute.

Mark: Right.

Jill: So, I’m just worried that might happen. But, I guess, you know, it’s not that big a deal. It’s not the end of the world.

Mark: Well, I guess you’ll always find somewhere to sleep, theoretically. At least it’s not cold there.

Jill: That’s right.

That’s what he says. He says, I mean, if there ends up being only a very expensive place that has rooms left then, you know, it’s not like we don’t want to spend that kind of money, but it’s not like we can’t. Il dit, je veux dire, s'il ne reste qu'un endroit très cher qui a encore des chambres, alors, vous savez, ce n'est pas comme si nous ne voulions pas dépenser ce genre d'argent, mais ce n'est pas comme si nous ne pouvions pas. 他说,我的意思是,如果最终只有一个非常昂贵的地方还有房间,那么,你知道,不是我们不想花那样的钱,但也不是我们不能。 It’s not like if we had no other option we couldn’t. 如果我们没有其他选择,我们就不能。

Mark: Right.

Jill: By the same token, if there are only crappy places available then, I guess,

Mark: there’s only crappy places available.

Jill: That’s right and you’ve just got to deal with it.

Mark: Yup. Oh well, hopefully, it all goes smoothly. Eh bien, j'espère que tout se passera bien. If not, as you say, we’ll be treated to some great stories, I am sure, when you get back. Sinon, comme vous le dites, nous aurons droit à de belles histoires, j'en suis sûr, à votre retour.

Jill: Well, it was funny. I was talking to my friend the other night about the trip and I was telling her when we get to Costa Rica what we’re gonna do and go for some hikes in the rain forest and I was so excited about this. It is going to be so beautiful and seeing different, you know, trees and animals and stuff that you would never see here. I thought it just sounded awesome and I’m so excited and all she could say was you couldn’t pay me any amount of money to go hiking in the rain forest in the jungle. That’s how she feels. That the thought of hiking through forests where there is snakes, tarantulas, whatever,

Mark: who knows what kind of bugs and

Jill: which I hate just as much as the next person; probably more than a lot of people, but, I guess, the positives outweigh that for me. Jill : que je déteste autant que la personne suivante ; probablement plus que beaucoup de gens, mais, je suppose, les points positifs l'emportent sur moi.

Mark: Right.

Jill: But, yeah, she just couldn’t believe it. Jill : Mais, ouais, elle ne pouvait tout simplement pas y croire. It was just not something she would ever be interested in doing. Ce n'était tout simplement pas quelque chose qui l'intéresserait un jour.

Mark: Right.

Jill: So, it’s just different strokes. Jill : Donc, c'est juste des coups différents. 吉尔:所以,这只是不同的笔画。

Mark: Yeah, and I guess it depends. I think there is probably different levels of rain forest in terms of I don’t know, maybe not. I mean, presumably, rain forest sounds like you’re in the middle of, yeah, the jungle. I always picture the rain forest in Brazil where you’ve got these, you know, the natives.

Jill: Picture the Amazon.

Mark: The natives with the, whatever, piece of bone through their nose and

Jill: Very stereotypical view of the rain forest, I think.

Mark: I just picture that kind of a rain forest being somewhere, yeah, where there’s snakes and, I don’t know what manner of bugs and piranhas and I don?t know what and thinking, ooohhh. Mark : J'imagine juste ce genre de forêt tropicale quelque part, ouais, où il y a des serpents et, je ne sais pas quelle sorte d'insectes et de piranhas et je ne sais pas quoi et je pense, ooohhh. But, probably, like all these things because we have no experience in that environment it just sounds like ah, you know, not just

Jill: .so foreign

Mark: the end of the world. I mean, it’s so foreign. Je veux dire, c'est tellement étranger. I mean, I think, I would imagine that people there if you told them they could come here and wander through the forest and there’s bears and cougars and whatever, other things, I mean, there’s all kinds of animals in the woods.

Jill: And we go in our forests all the time and don’t think anything of it.

Mark: I think, probably, the worst thing in the rain forest, assuming you’re not bitten by a poisonous snake, which, I’m sure, doesn’t happen that often.

Jill: No.

Mark: Probably, the worst thing will be bugs just like here in the woods. The bugs are a nuisance.

Jill: Mosquitoes and things like that, yeah.

Mark: I mean, we’re used to that here, so. Mark : Je veux dire, nous sommes habitués à ça ici, donc.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: I mean, it will be neat. Mark : Je veux dire, ce sera chouette. Марк: Я маю на увазі, це буде акуратно.

Jill: I mean, it’s become a touristy thing to do now anyway. So, I mean, they have guided tours; there’s trails. It’s not like you’re bushwhacking through the jungle and breaking trail and camping out, you know. Ce n'est pas comme si vous vous promeniez dans la jungle et que vous trouviez un sentier et que vous campiez, vous savez. Het is niet alsof je door de jungle raast en een pad afbreekt en kampeert, weet je.

Mark: Although, that would be fun, too.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: Pith helmet with your machete. Mark : Casque colonial avec votre machette. Марк: Пробний шолом з мачете. 马克:用你的大砍刀的木髓头盔。

Jill: No, I’m not into that, but, yeah, I think, you know, generally now, you go as a group with people who know the area, know what they’re doing; there are proper supplies. Jill : Non, je ne suis pas dans ça, mais, oui, je pense, vous savez, généralement maintenant, vous y allez en groupe avec des gens qui connaissent la région, savent ce qu'ils font ; il y a des fournitures appropriées. I think it’s fairly safe.

Mark: And are you going to do this thing I’ve seen this thing they show on TV. Mark : Et tu vas faire ce truc que j'ai vu ce truc qu'ils montrent à la télé. They’ve got the platforms up in the treetops with the zip line between the platforms. Ils ont les plates-formes dans les cimes des arbres avec la tyrolienne entre les plates-formes.

Jill: Yeah.

You know, I don’t think so because it’s very expensive.

Mark: Oh, it is aye

Jill: Aye and I don’t it’s not that big of a thrill. Jill : Oui et moi non, ce n'est pas si excitant. 吉尔:是的,我不觉得这不是什么大刺激。 I’ve read about it in Costa Rica and I’ve read lots of what people have said and said yeah, it’s definitely not worth the money. It doesn’t take very long and it’s not one of the most spectacular areas, you know, and Chris has done things so much more exciting than that in places that are so much more I don’t know what the word is, but just that just doesn’t really appeal to him and to me it just doesn’t appeal because I don’t even like heights. Cela ne prend pas très longtemps et ce n'est pas l'un des endroits les plus spectaculaires, vous savez, et Chris a fait des choses tellement plus excitantes que ça dans des endroits qui sont tellement plus je ne sais pas quel est le mot, mais juste ça ne lui plaît pas vraiment et ça ne me plaît pas vraiment parce que je n'aime même pas les hauteurs. So, I don’t want to be dangling from something over a gorge or whatever. Donc, je ne veux pas être suspendu à quelque chose au-dessus d'une gorge ou quoi que ce soit. Отже, я не хочу бовтатися з чогось над ущелиною чи чим завгодно.

Mark: The zip line part of it doesn’t appeal to me either, but maybe, being up that high up in the tree would be neat, I don’t know.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: Supposedly, you see all kinds of different wildlife up there that you wouldn’t normally see, but. Mark : Soi-disant, vous voyez toutes sortes d'animaux sauvages là-haut que vous ne verriez pas normalement, mais.

Jill: Yeah and I’ve read things too and maybe that’s true, sometimes you do. But I’ve read other people who’ve said no, it was a disappointment and I didn’t see anything that special so, who knows.

Mark: And, of course, with any trip there’s always a range of options; a range of things you can do, some more expensive than others, and you have to figure out the ones that are worth doing. Mark : Et, bien sûr, pour tout voyage, il y a toujours une gamme d'options ; une gamme de choses que vous pouvez faire, certaines plus chères que d'autres, et vous devez déterminer celles qui valent la peine d'être faites.

Jill: That’s right.

Mark: You know, so much of being in a different place is achieved or, at least, you get a lot or the most out of it just by being there, just by meeting with the locals, eating what they eat, seeing what they do, you know. Mark : Vous savez, le fait d'être dans un endroit différent est si important ou, du moins, vous en tirez le meilleur parti simplement en étant là, simplement en rencontrant les habitants, en mangeant ce qu'ils mangent, en voyant ce qu'ils sais-tu. You don’t have to be doing some kind of super adventure trip, whatever. Vous n'avez pas besoin de faire une sorte de super voyage d'aventure, peu importe. You know, just by being there and seeing how people how they live in their part of the world is so interesting.

Jill: An adventure in and of itself. 吉尔:本身就是一次冒险。

Mark: Yeah, exactly.

Jill: Yeah, just being somewhere totally different. It’s a foreign language, different food. Although, Central America, I mean, they eat a lot of chicken and rice, just like in South America. It’s not like it’s food that’s extremely different than we would encounter here.

Mark: Right.

Jill: But, still, yeah, of course, the customs are going to be different, the language, definitely the weather. Jill : Mais, quand même, oui, bien sûr, les coutumes vont être différentes, la langue, certainement le temps.

Mark: And just what the country’s like. You just don’t know what a country’s like. You don’t have a feel for it at all until you actually go there. Vous n'en avez aucune idée tant que vous n'y êtes pas allé. And just how they live, what their houses are like, what cars they drive, how they dress, how they talk, what they eat, what hours they keep. Et comment ils vivent, à quoi ressemblent leurs maisons, quelles voitures ils conduisent, comment ils s'habillent, comment ils parlent, ce qu'ils mangent, à quelles heures ils passent. I mean, it’s just sort of the flavor of a place that you just can’t imagine without going there. Je veux dire, c'est juste une sorte de saveur d'un endroit que vous ne pouvez pas imaginer sans y aller.

Jill: Yeah, that’s right.

Mark: Like, I’ve never been to South America or Central America or Mexico for that matter. So, I have an image in my mind of what those places are like, but I’m sure it’s a far cry and they are all, obviously, probably quite different from each other. Donc, j'ai une image dans mon esprit de ce à quoi ressemblent ces endroits, mais je suis sûr que c'est loin et qu'ils sont tous, évidemment, probablement très différents les uns des autres. But, I should go. Costa Rica I have a grandmother from Costa Rica.

Jill: That’s right.

Your mom’s mom is Costa Rican.

Mark: Yeah, so I think I have family there, actually.

Jill: Well, yeah, I would imagine. Has your mom ever been?

Mark: I think my mom might have been once, yeah. Mark : Je pense que ma mère l'a peut-être été une fois, ouais.

Jill: Well, it’s really become quite a popular place.

Mark: Yeah, it has.

Jill: I mean, I have a friend who started going there a few years ago with her family and they ended up buying a couple of places there. It’s become quite lucrative. People are buying up land. My boyfriend’s sister, about five years ago, bought some land there with some other people and it’s just skyrocketed. La sœur de mon petit ami, il y a environ cinq ans, a acheté un terrain là-bas avec d'autres personnes et ça a monté en flèche.

Mark: Land or with, in fact, a house on it?

Jill: No, they just bought land and they are going to build on it and then rent it out and go and stay there for a month out of the year and rent it out the rest of the time. Jill : Non, ils viennent d'acheter un terrain et ils vont construire dessus, puis le louer et y rester un mois par an et le louer le reste du temps.

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: So, real estate there has really been going up as a lot of foreigners are coming in. Jill : Donc, l'immobilier y a vraiment augmenté car beaucoup d'étrangers arrivent.

Mark: And how can I ask how you get there? Mark : Et comment puis-je vous demander comment vous y êtes arrivé ? Like, do you have to fly to Miami?

Jill: We are going from Vancouver. We have a fairly direct flight. We hebben een redelijk directe vlucht. It goes from Vancouver to Houston and then from Houston right to San Jose the capital of Costa Rica.

Mark: Right.

Jill: The other option from Vancouver is through L.A. So, Vancouver to L.A. to Costa Rica, but that was going to actually take longer. I can’t remember for what reason, but maybe the layover was longer. There was just something about it that wasn’t as good, so we went the Houston route. So, yeah, it’s a three-hour layover in Houston then you get to Costa Rica. And San Jose there’s two airports there Liberia and San Jose. Most people or the area of Costa Rica that is the most famous for the surf, so where most people would probably want to go, is sort of a little is obviously on the coast and a little further south not in the northern part, so it’s actually a five-hour drive from San Jose. La plupart des gens ou la région du Costa Rica qui est la plus célèbre pour le surf, donc là où la plupart des gens voudraient probablement aller, c'est en quelque sorte un peu évidemment sur la côte et un peu plus au sud pas dans la partie nord, donc c'est en fait à cinq heures de route de San Jose.

Mark: From the airport.

Jill: Or you can catch -- which we are going to do -- another half-hour flight down there for like $75.00 a person to get to the actual Jill : Ou vous pouvez prendre -- ce que nous allons faire -- un autre vol d'une demi-heure là-bas pour environ 75,00 $ par personne pour vous rendre au véritable

Mark: on Air Costa Rica?

Jill: I don’t know what the airline is. It takes you to, I guess, Tambour, which I’m not sure if that’s the name of a city or more the name of a province, a region. I’m not quite sure. But then that’s sort of where everybody then catches a taxi -- another 50 minute taxi ride -- to their different hotels and whatnot.

Mark: I’m sure you’ll give us a geography report when you come back. Mark : Je suis sûr que vous nous donnerez un rapport géographique à votre retour.

Jill: Yes. I think it’s quite a production to get there. Je pense que c'est toute une production pour en arriver là.

Mark: Well, sure.

Jill: It’s going to take a long time.

Mark: From here to Houston is probably four hours.

Jill: Yeah, I think it’s about four hours.

Mark: And then from Houston down there.

Jill: It’s not very far, actually. If it was a direct flight from here to Costa Rica, it would have only been something like eight hours.

Mark: Okay.

Jill: Like it’s seven or eight hours, but because there’s a three and a half hour layover Jill : Comme si c'était sept ou huit heures, mais parce qu'il y a une escale de trois heures et demie

Mark: it’s still pretty far.

Jill: Yeah, it is. Yeah, it’s like going to Europe or something.

Mark: That’s right.

Jill: But, because there’s that layover and then when we get to San Jose we have a layover for an hour and a half, then we get on another flight and then we have to get a taxi. Jill : Mais, parce qu'il y a cette escale et puis quand nous arrivons à San Jose, nous avons une escale d'une heure et demie, puis nous prenons un autre vol et ensuite nous devons prendre un taxi. So, all in all, it’s going to end up being about probably a 14-hour day. Donc, dans l'ensemble, cela finira probablement par être une journée de 14 heures.

Mark: At least. By the time you, you know, you get up, get to the airport early and everything, by the time you roll into your hotel it’s probably longer, yeah. Au moment où vous, vous savez, vous vous levez, arrivez tôt à l'aéroport et tout, au moment où vous arrivez à votre hôtel, c'est probablement plus long, oui.

Jill: Like 15 hours, yeah.

Mark: You’ll be happy to hit the bed. Hit the sheets. Вдарити по простирадлах.

Jill: Hit the hay, yeah. Jill : Frappez le foin, ouais.

Mark: Yeah, well, that will be good.

Jill: The good thing is it’s only a two-hour time difference. It’s two hours ahead.

Mark: That’s nice. That makes a big difference, you know.

Jill: A big difference.

Mark: Even with us going to Hawaii’I don’t know what the time difference is, but it’s two or three hours or whatever it is.

Jill: It’s behind two hours.

Mark: It’s not that big a deal; whereas, if you go to Europe or you go to Asia the time difference really takes it out of you for a few days.

Jill: Yeah, it really does.

Mark: So, it is. It’s kind of nice not to have to worry about that when you are only talking about two-three hours time difference. C'est plutôt agréable de ne pas avoir à s'en soucier quand on ne parle que de deux à trois heures de décalage horaire.

Jill: Yeah, yeah and coming home it’s very hard also. You’re so tired coming home and then you’ve got to adjust. But, two hours is really not that big a deal.

Mark: No.

Jill: You know, in one day you’ll be adjusted to their clock and it will be fine.

Mark: Exactly. I think I’ve heard people say it’s basically a day per hour of time difference that it takes you to recover. 我想我听过人们说它基本上是每小时一天的时差,它需要你恢复。 I think that’s probably fairly accurate.

Jill: Yeah, I agree.

Mark: So, yeah, that is convenient, yeah. I should really get down there some day. Je devrais vraiment y aller un jour.

Jill: Well, there’s lots of time. Maybe when the kids are a little bit older and they, you know -- teenagers even -- so that they would actually sort of appreciate some of the jungle experience. I mean, to me, personally, to go somewhere like that if you’re just going to go to sit on the beach, which a lot of people do and, I guess, that’s fine for them, but for me personally if I’m going to do that I’m going to go to Hawaii. Je veux dire, pour moi, personnellement, aller quelque part comme ça si vous allez juste vous asseoir sur la plage, ce que beaucoup de gens font et, je suppose, c'est bien pour eux, mais pour moi personnellement, si je ' Je vais faire ça, je vais aller à Hawaï. Why am I going to go to Central America where there’s such a variety in culture, history, language -- it’s so different -- just to go sit at a resort on a beach. To me, that doesn’t make a lot of sense. Pour moi, cela n'a pas beaucoup de sens.

Mark: No.

Jill: If you are going to go somewhere like that to get the cultural experience out of it and to go to the rain forest and to do all of those things. Jill : Si vous allez dans un endroit comme celui-là pour en tirer une expérience culturelle et aller dans la forêt tropicale et faire toutes ces choses. So, if you’ve got small kids where you are probably not going to be able to do those things and you’re going to spend a whole lot of money to get there. Donc, si vous avez de jeunes enfants, vous ne pourrez probablement pas faire ces choses et vous allez dépenser beaucoup d'argent pour y arriver. 所以,如果你有小孩,你可能无法做这些事情,你会花很多钱去那里。

Mark: Right.

Well, that’s the thing. They don’t appreciate, as you say any of the cultural experiences they don’t appreciate at all, really.

Jill: No, no.

Mark: They know what they know and they know that they like it nice and hot and they like it in the pool and that’s all they need. Mark : Ils savent ce qu'ils savent et ils savent qu'ils aiment le beau et le chaud et ils aiment ça dans la piscine et c'est tout ce dont ils ont besoin. So, yeah, like you say, to go somewhere exotic is going to be more expensive and more of an ordeal getting there, more difficult when you are there and, you know, yeah, we might enjoy it a little more, although not necessarily if everybody else isn’t enjoying it.

Jill: Yeah, that’s right.

Mark: Yeah.

So, I agree. Probably as we get older we will definitely start to go. You know, we should go to Europe, we should go to Asia, go to Latin America, South America, different places to see things, but not until the kids are old enough to appreciate it as a group.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: Because they you know, everybody’s plane ticket costs pretty much the same.

Jill: Yeah, that’s right.

It’s expensive.

Mark: It’s expensive, yeah, but well worth it. Anyway, I think that’s probably good. Just want to remind everyone again to come visit our website and I know we look forward to hearing a report from Jill on her adventures after she gets back. Je veux juste rappeler à tout le monde de venir visiter notre site Web et je sais que nous avons hâte d'entendre un rapport de Jill sur ses aventures après son retour.