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English LingQ Podcast 1.0, Sixty-two: Life in Japan

Sixty-two: Life in Japan

Steve: Hello, Jill.

Jill: Hi, Steve.

Steve: Today we have a special guest and maybe you can introduce him.

Jill: We have Mr. Stephen Coyle with us, who is a very funny guy, gets people laughing around the KP Wood/LingQ office and he's going to talk to us today about his experience living and teaching in Japan.

Steve: We might just explain that KP Wood, of course, is a company involved in the international trade of lumber, wood products, with offices in two Canadian provinces, in Sweden and Japan.

Stephen Coyle is responsible for sales to Japan and purchasing in Sweden so he travels a lot to both Japan and to Sweden. In fact, you are going off to Sweden next week but in his previous career he was a teacher in Japan. So, let me go back Stephen to there you were…tell us when it was and what your feelings were as you went out to Japan for the first time.

Stephen: A couple of years after graduating from university I decided to move to Japan partly to teach English and partly to study Japanese language and culture and business. So in April of 1990 I arrived in Japan which was right near the end of the “Bubble Economy” in Japan so times were still good those days. Teachers got paid a lot of yen. There were a lot of after-work dinner parties, etc. and we had a fun time.

Steve: And what were your expectations? I mean you had grown up in Canada and perhaps I think traveled around in North America, maybe elsewhere, but you hadn't been to Japan before; Asian country. What did you expect and how was your experience there different from your expectations?

Stephen: Yes. I had grown up in seven or eight different cities throughout North America and I traveled around the world mostly Australia, Europe. In Asia the only places I had been to were Thailand and Hong Kong so I thought that Tokyo would be similar to Hong Kong. When I got there I was surprised to see that actually it's quite a different place than Hong Kong; a little more organized and the pace is different.

Steve: And you went there with the intention on teaching English. Did you have a job before you went there or how did you get your job?

Stephen: Yes. I was hired by a company GEOS Language Systems in Japan which at the time was the world's largest English academy. They have a branch office in Vancouver where I was interviewed and trained and hired and they sent me to Japan. My prerequisite for the job was that I wanted to live in Tokyo. I did not want to live in the countryside because my stereotype or image of the countryside was that it would be quite backwards. Little did I know it was far from the truth.

Steve: Now did you study…I know, Jill, you took a course in teaching English as a second language. How long was that course and what did that amount to?

Jill: I think it was, wow, maybe one to two months. I can't remember. I think it was everyday. It was Monday to Friday I believe for one month so four and a half weeks or something like that. And it was…really there were only a few native speakers, English speakers in the class, myself any maybe three other people and the rest of the class were Japanese; Japanese and Korean I think were the two main groups.

Steve: Yeah, you know, I have seen some of these people who have these degrees in teaching English as a second language and I've often felt that many of them could benefit by joining LingQ and improving their English. That's not to be unfair and I know myself when I studied French in our school system our French teachers at school couldn't speak French. So, there is nothing unusual about a language teacher teaching a language that they're not really fluent in. But did you Stephen have to take a course in any kind of specialized English as a second language teaching methodology?

Stephen: No, I didn't. Actually in those days in 1990 there was such a demand for teachers in Japan that basically anybody who had a university diploma could get a Visa and find a company to hire them quite easily in Japan. In those days we were more entertainers than we were teachers. We had to look good which when I was a younger man I was a little more handsome; a little bit thinner. We had to look good, we had to smile and we had to keep the students entertained. That's what we were told to do. Entertain them so they would keep renewing their memberships and continue to study English.

Steve: But, you know, that's not an entirely bad philosophy rather than trying to teach them the dry rules of grammar. That's what we ask Jill to do on her chats with people and so that people want to come back and chat to Jill and they come and visit Jill and so forth so it's all about entertaining. But seriously though, we do believe at LingQ that if you're having a good time, if you're enjoying the language, you're more likely to learn. If you make it a very onerous burden people will just not do it which brings me to another question. You had learners in the class and maybe you can tell us a little bit about the kinds of learners you had and I'm just curious if they studied outside the classroom or if most of their learning took place when they were with you?

Stephen: Actually most of my students were between the age of 18 to 30; university students trying to improve their English so that they could get hired by an international company or people, young businessmen, young businesswomen, that wanted to use English in business. They were all quite busy and the only time that they really studied English was in the class with me once or twice a week. You have to remember in 1990 to 1993 there was no Internet so it was very difficult to find English materials to study other than books or going to watch a movie or renting a video.

Steve: And did your students improve? I'm sure many of them did. What percentage…how many of the let's say out of 10 typically would do well? How many would not progress at all? I don't know, Jill, if you want to comment on this. I see you want to get a comment in.

Jill: No. I was just going to say how many stayed the same? You know, were with you for a year and after a year basically their level hadn't changed at all. I would assume that would be quite common.

Stephen: Well, I was quite proud of my efforts there. I mean, I did prepare a lot for my classes to make them entertaining as well as educational but no matter how hard I prepared it all depended on the student. And especially in Japan where a lot of people, especially the men are quite shy to speak a foreign language, some people progressed quickly and some progressed slowly and some didn't progress. Typically the young women progressed much faster than the men because I think they didn't have as much pride or embarrassment. So it really depended on the student but I would say 60 to 70 percent of the students in a one-year period you could notice a definite improvement.

Steve: How many were there in each class and how much were the students paying per hour for their session?

Stephen: Well, we had some students taking private lessons which, of course, is only one student per class. At the time it was $9 to $10,000 yen an hour which would be about $100.00 Canadian. It was quite expensive so I really tried my best to prepare for those classes because I felt bad that the students were paying that much money. Of course they weren't paying to me they were paying to the school. In the group lessons we would have anywhere from four to eight students.

Steve: Now you then came back to Canada after some years and then, perhaps, tell us a little bit about your second career.

Stephen: Well, when I returned to Canada…you have to remember before I went to Japan I was working for the Canadian government in the trade division which spurred on my interest in international trade which was the main reason I moved to Japan to study Japanese and do trade with Japan. So when I returned to Canada I was lucky enough to find a company that was trading lumber to Japan which is the company I'm with now KP Wood Ltd. www.kpwood.com and I've been here ever since. It's been 14 years now trading lumber with Japan.


Sixty-two: Life in Japan

Steve: Hello, Jill.

Jill: Hi, Steve.

Steve: Today we have a special guest and maybe you can introduce him.

Jill: We have Mr. Stephen Coyle with us, who is a very funny guy, gets people laughing around the KP Wood/LingQ office and he’s going to talk to us today about his experience living and teaching in Japan.

Steve: We might just explain that KP Wood, of course, is a company involved in the international trade of lumber, wood products, with offices in two Canadian provinces, in Sweden and Japan.

Stephen Coyle is responsible for sales to Japan and purchasing in Sweden so he travels a lot to both Japan and to Sweden. Stephen Coyle est responsable des ventes au Japon et des achats en Suède. Il voyage donc beaucoup au Japon et en Suède. In fact, you are going off to Sweden next week but in his previous career he was a teacher in Japan. En fait, vous partez en Suède la semaine prochaine, mais dans sa carrière précédente, il était enseignant au Japon. Aslında önümüzdeki hafta İsveç'e gidiyorsunuz ama önceki kariyerinde Japonya'da öğretmendi. So, let me go back Stephen to there you were…tell us when it was and what your feelings were as you went out to Japan for the first time. Alors, laissez-moi revenir Stephen là où vous étiez… dites-nous quand c'était et quels étaient vos sentiments lorsque vous êtes allé au Japon pour la première fois. それで、スティーブンに戻って、あなたがいた場所に戻りましょう…それがいつだったか、そしてあなたが初めて日本に出かけたときのあなたの気持ちを教えてください。 Öyleyse, Stephen'a oraya geri dönmeme izin verdin… bize ne zaman olduğunu ve ilk kez Japonya'ya çıkarken duygularının ne olduğunu söyle.

Stephen: A couple of years after graduating from university I decided to move to Japan partly to teach English and partly to study Japanese language and culture and business. Stephen : Quelques années après avoir obtenu mon diplôme universitaire, j'ai décidé de déménager au Japon en partie pour enseigner l'anglais et en partie pour étudier la langue, la culture et les affaires japonaises. So in April of 1990 I arrived in Japan which was right near the end of the “Bubble Economy” in Japan so times were still good those days. Donc, en avril 1990, je suis arrivé au Japon, qui était juste à la fin de la "bulle économique" au Japon, donc les temps étaient encore bons à cette époque. それで、1990年4月に日本の「バブル経済」の終わり近くに日本に到着したので、当時はまだ良い時代でした。 Bu yüzden, 1990’ın nisan ayında Japonya’ya geldim; Japonya’daki “Bubble Ekonomisi” nin sonuna doğru geldi, o zamanlar o zamanlar hala iyiydi. Teachers got paid a lot of yen. 先生はたくさんの円をもらった。 Öğretmenlere çok fazla yen ödendi. There were a lot of after-work dinner parties, etc. 仕事帰りの夕食会などもたくさんありました。 Bir sürü iş sonrası akşam yemeği partisi vardı. and we had a fun time. ve eğlenceli zaman geçirdik.

Steve: And what were your expectations? スティーブ:そして、あなたの期待は何でしたか? Steve: Peki beklentileriniz nelerdi? I mean you had grown up in Canada and perhaps I think traveled around in North America, maybe elsewhere, but you hadn’t been to Japan before; Asian country. Je veux dire que vous aviez grandi au Canada et peut-être que je pense avoir voyagé en Amérique du Nord, peut-être ailleurs, mais vous n'étiez pas allé au Japon auparavant; Pays asiatique. あなたはカナダで育ち、おそらく北米、おそらく他の場所を旅したと思いますが、あなたは以前に日本に行ったことがありませんでした。アジアの国。 Kanada’da büyüdüğünü ve belki de Kuzey Amerika’da, belki başka bir yerde seyahat ettiğini düşünüyorum, ama daha önce Japonya’ya gitmediniz; Asya ülkesi What did you expect and how was your experience there different from your expectations? À quoi vous attendiez-vous et en quoi votre expérience là-bas a-t-elle été différente de vos attentes ? あなたは何を期待しましたか、そしてそこでのあなたの経験はあなたの期待とどのように異なっていましたか?

Stephen: Yes. I had grown up in seven or eight different cities throughout North America and I traveled around the world mostly Australia, Europe. J'avais grandi dans sept ou huit villes différentes à travers l'Amérique du Nord et j'ai voyagé à travers le monde, principalement en Australie et en Europe. 私は北米の7つまたは8つの異なる都市で育ち、主にオーストラリア、ヨーロッパを旅しました。 Kuzey Amerika'da yedi ya da sekiz farklı şehirde büyüdüm ve çoğunlukla Avustralya ve Avrupa'yı dolaşıp dünyayı dolaştım. In Asia the only places I had been to were Thailand and Hong Kong so I thought that Tokyo would be similar to Hong Kong. En Asie, les seuls endroits où j'étais allé étaient la Thaïlande et Hong Kong, alors j'ai pensé que Tokyo serait similaire à Hong Kong. アジアではタイと香港しか行っていなかったので、東京は香港に似ていると思いました。 When I got there I was surprised to see that actually it’s quite a different place than Hong Kong; a little more organized and the pace is different. Quand je suis arrivé là-bas, j'ai été surpris de voir qu'en fait c'est un endroit assez différent de Hong Kong ; un peu plus organisé et le rythme est différent. そこに着いたとき、実際には香港とはかなり違う場所にいることに驚きました。もう少し整理されており、ペースが異なります。 Oraya vardığımda, aslında Hong Kong'dan oldukça farklı bir yer olduğunu görünce şaşırdım; biraz daha organize ve hızı farklı.

Steve: And you went there with the intention on teaching English. Steve: Ve oraya İngilizce öğretme niyeti ile gittin. Did you have a job before you went there or how did you get your job? Aviez-vous un emploi avant d'y aller ou comment avez-vous obtenu votre emploi? Oraya gitmeden önce bir işin oldu mu ya da işini nasıl aldın?

Stephen: Yes. I was hired by a company GEOS Language Systems in Japan which at the time was the world’s largest English academy. J'ai été embauché par une société GEOS Language Systems au Japon qui était à l'époque la plus grande académie d'anglais au monde. 私は当時世界最大の英語アカデミーであった日本のGEOSランゲージシステムズ社に雇われました。 They have a branch office in Vancouver where I was interviewed and trained and hired and they sent me to Japan. Ils ont une succursale à Vancouver où j'ai été interviewé, formé et embauché et ils m'ont envoyé au Japon. Ze hebben een filiaal in Vancouver, waar ik werd geïnterviewd en opgeleid en aangenomen, en ze stuurden me naar Japan. My prerequisite for the job was that I wanted to live in Tokyo. 仕事の前提条件は、東京に住みたいということでした。 I did not want to live in the countryside because my stereotype or image of the countryside was that it would be quite backwards. Je ne voulais pas vivre à la campagne parce que mon stéréotype ou mon image de la campagne était que ce serait assez rétrograde. 私は田舎のステレオタイプやイメージがかなり後ろ向きなので、田舎に住みたいとは思っていませんでした。 Kırsal kesimde yaşamak istemedim çünkü kırsal kesimdeki basmakalıp veya imgem oldukça geriye dönük olacaktı. Little did I know it was far from the truth. Je ne savais pas que c'était loin de la vérité. それが真実からかけ離れていることを私はほとんど知りませんでした。 Çok az gerçeği olduğunu biliyor muydum?

Steve: Now did you study…I know, Jill, you took a course in teaching English as a second language. Steve : Maintenant, avez-vous étudié… Je sais, Jill, vous avez suivi un cours d'enseignement de l'anglais comme langue seconde. How long was that course and what did that amount to? Combien de temps a duré ce cours et combien cela a-t-il coûté? そのコースはどのくらいの期間でしたか? Bu kurs ne kadar sürdü ve bu miktar neydi?

Jill: I think it was, wow, maybe one to two months. Jill : Je pense que c'était, wow, peut-être un à deux mois. I can’t remember. I think it was everyday. It was Monday to Friday I believe for one month so four and a half weeks or something like that. C'était du lundi au vendredi, je crois, pendant un mois donc quatre semaines et demie ou quelque chose comme ça. 月曜日から金曜日だったので、1ヶ月は4週間半くらいだと思います。 And it was…really there were only a few native speakers, English speakers in the class, myself any maybe three other people and the rest of the class were Japanese; Japanese and Korean I think were the two main groups. Et c'était… vraiment il n'y avait que quelques locuteurs natifs, des anglophones dans la classe, moi-même peut-être trois autres personnes et le reste de la classe était japonais ; Je pense que les japonais et les coréens étaient les deux principaux groupes. そして、それは…実際には、クラスにはネイティブスピーカー、英語スピーカーはほんの数人しかいませんでした。私自身、おそらく他の3人で、クラスの残りは日本人でした。日本人と韓国人が2つの主要なグループだったと思います。

Steve: Yeah, you know, I have seen some of these people who have these degrees in teaching English as a second language and I’ve often felt that many of them could benefit by joining LingQ and improving their English. Steve : Oui, vous savez, j'ai vu certaines de ces personnes qui ont ces diplômes en enseignement de l'anglais comme langue seconde et j'ai souvent pensé que beaucoup d'entre elles pourraient bénéficier en rejoignant LingQ et en améliorant leur anglais. スティーブ:ええ、あなたが知っている、私は第二言語として英語を教えることでこれらの学位を持っているこれらの人々の何人かを見ました、そして私は彼らの多くがLingQに参加して彼らの英語を改善することによって利益を得ることができるとしばしば感じました。 Steve: Evet, bilirsin, İngilizceyi ikinci dil olarak öğrenmede bu derecelere sahip olan bu insanların bazılarını gördüm ve çoğu zaman LingQ’ya katılarak ve İngilizcelerini artırarak yarar sağlayabileceğini hissettim. That’s not to be unfair and I know myself when I studied French in our school system our French teachers at school couldn’t speak French. Ce n'est pas injuste et je me connais quand j'étudiais le français dans notre système scolaire, nos professeurs de français à l'école ne pouvaient pas parler français. それは不公平ではありません。私が学校のシステムでフランス語を勉強したとき、学校のフランス語教師はフランス語を話すことができませんでした。 Bu haksızlık değil ve okul sistemimizde Fransızca okuduğumda kendimi biliyorum, okuldaki Fransızca öğretmenlerimiz Fransızca konuşamıyordu. So, there is nothing unusual about a language teacher teaching a language that they’re not really fluent in. Il n'y a donc rien d'inhabituel à ce qu'un professeur de langue enseigne une langue qu'il ne maîtrise pas vraiment. だから、実際に流暢でない言語を教えることについて、珍しいことは何もありません。 Bu nedenle, bir dil öğretmeni hakkında gerçekten akıcı olmayan bir dili öğreten olağandışı bir şey yoktur. But did you Stephen have to take a course in any kind of specialized English as a second language teaching methodology? Mais avez-vous, Stephen, dû suivre un cours sur une méthodologie d'enseignement spécialisée de l'anglais langue seconde? しかし、スティーブンスは、第二言語の教授方法論として、あらゆる種類の専門英語を学ぶ必要がありましたか? Ancak Stephen, ikinci bir dil öğretme metodolojisi olarak herhangi bir uzmanlık İngilizcesi kursuna katıldınız mı?

Stephen: No, I didn’t. Actually in those days in 1990 there was such a demand for teachers in Japan that basically anybody who had a university diploma could get a Visa and find a company to hire them quite easily in Japan. 実際、1990年の当時、日本の教師には、基本的に大学卒業証書を持っている人なら誰でもビザを手に入れ、会社を日本でかなり簡単に雇うことができるという需要がありました。 Aslında 1990’daki o günlerde, Japonya’daki öğretmenlere, üniversite diploması olan herhangi birinin Vize alabilmesi ve Japonya’da bu işi kolayca alabilecek bir şirket bulabilmesi için bir talep vardı. In those days we were more entertainers than we were teachers. 当時、私たちは先生よりももっとエンターテイナーでした。 O günlerde öğretmen olduğumuzdan daha eğlendirici olduk. We had to look good which when I was a younger man I was a little more handsome; a little bit thinner. Nous devions bien paraître et quand j'étais plus jeune, j'étais un peu plus beau; un peu plus mince. 私は、私が若い頃はもう少しハンサムだったが、よく見えなければならなかった。少し薄い。 Genç göründüğümde biraz daha yakışıklı olduğum için iyi görünmeliydik; biraz tiner. We had to look good, we had to smile and we had to keep the students entertained. Nous devions bien paraître, nous devions sourire et nous devions divertir les étudiants. 私たちはよく見えなければならなかった、私たちは笑顔にしなければならず、私たちは学生を楽しませなければならなかった。 İyi görünmek zorundaydık, gülümsemeliydik ve öğrencileri eğlendirmek zorunda kaldık. That’s what we were told to do. C'est ce qu'on nous a dit de faire. それが私たちに言われたことです。 Yapmamız söylenen şey buydu. Entertain them so they would keep renewing their memberships and continue to study English. Divertissez-les pour qu'ils continuent à renouveler leur adhésion et continuent à étudier l'anglais. 彼らがメンバーシップを更新し続け、英語を勉強し続けるように彼らを楽しませてください。 Onları eğlendirin, böylece üyeliklerini yenilemeye devam ederler ve İngilizce öğrenmeye devam ederler.

Steve: But, you know, that’s not an entirely bad philosophy rather than trying to teach them the dry rules of grammar. Steve : Mais, vous savez, ce n'est pas une philosophie entièrement mauvaise plutôt que d'essayer de leur enseigner les règles sèches de la grammaire. スティーブ:しかし、それは文法の乾いたルールを彼らに教えようとするのではなく、完全に悪い哲学ではありません。 Steve: Fakat biliyorsunuz, bu onlara gramerin kuru kurallarını öğretmeye çalışmak yerine, tamamen kötü bir felsefe değildir. That’s what we ask Jill to do on her chats with people and so that people want to come back and chat to Jill and they come and visit Jill and so forth so it’s all about entertaining. C'est ce que nous demandons à Jill de faire lors de ses conversations avec les gens et pour que les gens veuillent revenir et discuter avec Jill et qu'ils viennent rendre visite à Jill et ainsi de suite, donc tout est divertissant. それが私たちがジルに人々とのチャットでやるように頼むことであり、人々が戻ってジルとチャットしたい、そして彼らがジルに来て訪問するなど、それはすべて面白いことです。 But seriously though, we do believe at LingQ that if you’re having a good time, if you’re enjoying the language, you’re more likely to learn. Mais sérieusement, nous pensons chez LingQ que si vous passez un bon moment, si vous appréciez la langue, vous avez plus de chances d'apprendre. しかし、真剣に、LingQでは、楽しい時間を過ごしていれば、言語を楽しんでいれば、学ぶ可能性が高いと信じています。 If you make it a very onerous burden people will just not do it which brings me to another question. あなたがそれを非常に厄介な負担にすると、人々はそれをしないでしょう、それは私に別の質問をもたらします。 Çok ağır bir yük yaparsanız, insanlar bunu yapmazlar, bu da beni başka bir soruya götürür. You had learners in the class and maybe you can tell us a little bit about the kinds of learners you had and I’m just curious if they studied outside the classroom or if most of their learning took place when they were with you? Vous aviez des apprenants dans la classe et peut-être pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur les types d'apprenants que vous aviez et je suis simplement curieux de savoir s'ils ont étudié en dehors de la classe ou si la plupart de leur apprentissage a eu lieu lorsqu'ils étaient avec vous ? クラスに学習者がいましたが、あなたが持っていた学習者の種類について少し教えていただけますか。彼らが教室の外で勉強したのか、それともほとんどの学習があなたと一緒に行われたのか、私は興味がありますか? Sınıfta öğrenenler vardı ve belki bize sahip olduğunuz türler hakkında biraz bilgi verebilir ve sadece sınıf dışında çalışıp çalışmadıklarını ya da öğrendiklerinin çoğunun yanınızdayken gerçekleştiğini merak ediyorum

Stephen: Actually most of my students were between the age of 18 to 30; university students trying to improve their English so that they could get hired by an international company or people, young businessmen, young businesswomen, that wanted to use English in business. Stephen : En fait, la plupart de mes élèves avaient entre 18 et 30 ans ; des étudiants universitaires essayant d'améliorer leur anglais afin de pouvoir être embauchés par une entreprise internationale ou des personnes, de jeunes hommes d'affaires, de jeunes femmes d'affaires, qui souhaitaient utiliser l'anglais dans les affaires. They were all quite busy and the only time that they really studied English was in the class with me once or twice a week. Ils étaient tous très occupés et la seule fois où ils ont vraiment étudié l'anglais, c'était en classe avec moi une ou deux fois par semaine. You have to remember in 1990 to 1993 there was no Internet so it was very difficult to find English materials to study other than books or going to watch a movie or renting a video.

Steve: And did your students improve? I’m sure many of them did. 私はそれらの多くがしたと確信しています。 What percentage…how many of the let’s say out of 10 typically would do well? Quel pourcentage…combien parmi les disons sur 10 s'en sortiraient généralement bien ? どのパーセンテージ...どのくらいの人が10人のうち、どれがうまくいくと言いますか? Hangi yüzde… Diyelim ki 10 kişiden kaçı normalde iyi olur? How many would not progress at all? まったく進まない人は何人いますか? I don’t know, Jill, if you want to comment on this. Bilmiyorum Jill, bu konuda yorum yapmak istersen. I see you want to get a comment in. Je vois que vous voulez ajouter un commentaire. 私はあなたがコメントをしたいと思うのを見ます。 Görmek istediğin bir yorum almak istiyorsun.

Jill: No. I was just going to say how many stayed the same? J'allais juste dire combien sont restés les mêmes? 私はちょうど何人が同じにとどまったか言うつもりでしたか? Sadece kaçının aynı kaldığını söyleyecektim? You know, were with you for a year and after a year basically their level hadn’t changed at all. Vous savez, ils étaient avec vous depuis un an et après un an, leur niveau n'avait pratiquement pas changé du tout. ご存知のように、1年間、1年後には基本的にレベルは変わっていませんでした。 I would assume that would be quite common. Je suppose que ce serait assez courant. それはかなり一般的だと思います。 Bunun oldukça yaygın olacağını varsayardım.

Stephen: Well, I was quite proud of my efforts there. Stephen : Eh bien, j'étais assez fier de mes efforts là-bas. スティーブン:まあ、私はそこに私の努力を誇りに思っていた。 I mean, I did prepare a lot for my classes to make them entertaining as well as educational but no matter how hard I prepared it all depended on the student. Je veux dire, j'ai beaucoup préparé mes cours pour les rendre aussi divertissants qu'éducatifs, mais peu importe à quel point je les ai préparés, tout dépendait de l'élève. つまり、授業を面白くて教育的なものにするためにたくさんの準備をしましたが、どんなに一生懸命準備しても、すべて生徒次第でした。 And especially in Japan where a lot of people, especially the men are quite shy to speak a foreign language, some people progressed quickly and some progressed slowly and some didn’t progress. Typically the young women progressed much faster than the men because I think they didn’t have as much pride or embarrassment. Généralement, les jeunes femmes progressaient beaucoup plus vite que les hommes parce que je pense qu'elles n'avaient pas autant de fierté ou de gêne. 通常、若い女性は男性よりもはるかに速く進歩しました。なぜなら、彼らはそれほどプライドや恥ずかしさを持っていなかったと思うからです。 Tipik olarak genç kadınlar erkeklerden çok daha hızlı ilerledi çünkü bence çok fazla gurur veya utanç duymuyorlardı. So it really depended on the student but I would say 60 to 70 percent of the students in a one-year period you could notice a definite improvement. Cela dépendait donc vraiment de l'étudiant, mais je dirais que 60 à 70% des étudiants sur une période d'un an ont pu remarquer une nette amélioration. Bu gerçekten öğrenciye bağlıydı, ancak bir yıllık dönemde öğrencilerin yüzde 60 ila 70'inin kesin bir gelişme olduğunu fark edebileceğinizi söyleyebilirim.

Steve: How many were there in each class and how much were the students paying per hour for their session? スティーブ:各クラスには何人がいましたか、そして学生は彼らのセッションのために1時間あたりいくら払っていましたか?

Stephen: Well, we had some students taking private lessons which, of course, is only one student per class. Stephen : Eh bien, nous avions des étudiants qui prenaient des cours privés, ce qui, bien sûr, n'est qu'un étudiant par classe. スティーブン:ええと、私たちにはプライベートレッスンを受講している生徒がいました。もちろん、クラスごとに1人の生徒しかいません。 Stephen: Tabii ki, sınıf başına sadece bir öğrenci olan özel ders alan bazı öğrencilerimiz oldu. At the time it was $9 to $10,000 yen an hour which would be about $100.00 Canadian. À l'époque, c'était de 9 $ à 10 000 yens de l'heure, ce qui équivalait à environ 100,00 $ canadiens. O zaman saatte 9 ila 10,000 dolardı ve bu da yaklaşık 100,00 dolardı. It was quite expensive so I really tried my best to prepare for those classes because I felt bad that the students were paying that much money. かなり高額だったので、学生たちがそんなにお金を払っていて気分が悪かったので、クラスの準備に全力を尽くしました。 Oldukça pahalıydı, bu yüzden bu derslere hazırlanmak için elimden geleni yaptım çünkü öğrencilerin bu kadar para ödedikleri için kendimi kötü hissettim. Of course they weren’t paying to me they were paying to the school. もちろん、彼らは私にお金を払っていませんでした。彼らは学校にお金を払っていました。 In the group lessons we would have anywhere from four to eight students. Dans les cours collectifs, nous avions entre quatre et huit étudiants. グループレッスンでは、4人から8人の生徒がいます。 Grup derslerinde dört ila sekiz öğrenciden herhangi bir yerde olurduk.

Steve: Now you then came back to Canada after some years and then, perhaps, tell us a little bit about your second career.

Stephen: Well, when I returned to Canada…you have to remember before I went to Japan I was working for the Canadian government in the trade division which spurred on my interest in international trade which was the main reason I moved to Japan to study Japanese and do trade with Japan. Stephen : Eh bien, quand je suis revenu au Canada… vous devez vous rappeler qu'avant d'aller au Japon, je travaillais pour le gouvernement canadien dans la division commerciale, ce qui a stimulé mon intérêt pour le commerce international, ce qui a été la principale raison pour laquelle j'ai déménagé au Japon pour étudier le japonais. et faire du commerce avec le Japon. スティーブン:ええと、カナダに戻ったとき…日本に行く前にカナダ政府の貿易部門で働いていたので、国際貿易への興味が高まり、日本語を勉強するために日本に引っ越した主な理由でした。そして日本との貿易をします。 Stephen: Pekala, Kanada'ya döndüğümde… Japonya'ya gitmeden önce şunu hatırlamalısınız: Japon hükümetini incelemek için Japonya'ya taşınmamın ana nedeni olan uluslararası ticarete olan ilgimden kaynaklanan ticaret bölümünde Kanada hükümeti için çalışıyordum ve Japonya ile ticaret yapmak. So when I returned to Canada I was lucky enough to find a company that was trading lumber to Japan which is the company I’m with now KP Wood Ltd. Ainsi, lorsque je suis revenu au Canada, j'ai eu la chance de trouver une entreprise qui vendait du bois au Japon, qui est l'entreprise avec laquelle je travaille maintenant, KP Wood Ltd. ですから、カナダに戻ったとき、幸運にも、日本に木材を取引している会社を見つけることができました。それは、現在KP WoodLtdと一緒にいる会社です。 www.kpwood.com and I’ve been here ever since. www.kpwood.com et je suis ici depuis. www.kpwood.com ve o zamandan beri buradayım. It’s been 14 years now trading lumber with Japan.