×

We use cookies to help make LingQ better. By visiting the site, you agree to our cookie policy.


image

English LingQ Podcast 1.0, Sixty-one: Public Speaking

Sixty-one: Public Speaking

Steve: Hi, Jill.

Jill: Hi, again.

Steve: You know, I want to talk a little bit about public speaking.

I mentioned this on my blog but last night I was at a dinner. It was the annual meeting of the Japan-Canada Chamber of Commerce and I didn't realize this but we had our meeting from 6 to 7. The Chairman of the Chamber had arranged for the Consul General, the Japanese Consul General, to come and speak at 7 o'clock to the members and then at 7:30 the barbeque was going to begin on the garden terrace of a very nice hotel. Sounds like a nice evening?

Jill: Sure does.

Steve: Alright. Our Chairman managed to keep the Consul General waiting for half an hour which to me is unbelievable; unbelievable that you would invite the Consul or anyone…invite them to speak to your group and keep them waiting while you dealt with internal matters. It's just not done. I don't care if it's your general meeting or a meeting where you are having coffee at home with your friends you just don't invite someone and keep them waiting.

Jill: No.

Steve: Common courtesy.

Jill: Right.

Steve: That's an expression.

Jill: Common courtesy, yes.

Steve: Common courtesy.

You can also talk about common sense.

Jill: Which a lot of people don't have.

Steve: So, we're now a half hour late. At this point, I'm hungry. Okay? It's 7:30 and suddenly I'm told we have the Consul General here to talk to us. I had invited my wife and another couple to the barbeque because this was open to other people so now they have to wait for the Consul General to give his speech. So the Consul General then came and spoke in Japanese, which is fine, with English slides and he spoke for 45 minutes. So, what I'm leading to is I came across on the Internet a blog post, which is also in YouTube, by a person called Guy Kawasaki. Have you heard of Guy Kawasaki?

Jill: No, no I haven't.

Steve: Guy Kawasaki is very famous. He writes books on how to make money and how to be successful and how to do everything you ever wanted to do.

Jill: I don't read those kind of books.

Steve: Okay. No, I don't either but I found this and he gave a…in fact, I saw this YouTube and what he said basically was that if you are ever giving a presentation you have the 10-20-30 rule. Ten is the maximum number of PowerPoint slides. No more than 10; very, very good suggestion. The 20 refers to 20 minutes. Never speak longer than for 20 minutes and the 30 refers to the 30 point, you know, fonts – font points – whatever; make it big. Two advantages: 1) there's less for people to read and 2) they can read it.

Jill: They can see it.

Steve: So as I sat there listening to this Consul General drone on about things that were of no interest to anyone I just kept on saying to myself 10-20-30. So, that's my first comment. What is your reaction to all of that?

Jill: I don't know what I would have done. I would have been starving and you probably didn't eat until 9 o'clock.

Steve: 8:30. 8:30; the sun had gone down. We were going to have a nice sunset barbeque and we ended up with a barbeque in the dark.

Jill: See, I wouldn't be too anxious to go back to another one of those meetings.

Steve: So, I think the thing about public speaking is…a couple of things that sort of stuck with me there: one is the need to simplify and so 20 minutes is max. Unless you're a member of the communist party of some country where you can talk for six hours 20 minutes is max. The second thing I noticed was in that YouTube of Guy Kawasaki and others that I've seen on the Internet I find that I only remember what they said at the beginning. Have you had that experience?

Jill: Yeah. I mean I even think back to university courses where the teachers are up there lecturing and your attention span only lasts so long. That's why a lot of the classes were 50 minute classes which is still a long time but then you get into the two hour classes and sure you get a five minute break or something but most people I think are thinking about other things.

Steve: You know, I think too if you are in class you know you have to learn about what the professor is talking about because you have to write an exam.

Jill: Except for you also know that with a lot of professors they are just basically verbatim repeating what's in your textbook so you know you can just go read your textbook and find out all the same information.

Steve: But it made me think, you know. I sat there listening to the Consul General for 45 minutes. I mean, I was a prisoner, right? I couldn't leave. He had me. We're captive. I don't have to listen. I probably could close my eyes but that would be impolite so I'm stuck. But if I go on the Internet and I've now got this Google Reader set up so I'm getting these feeds from different blogs and podcast and whatever…say I'm reading something or I can look at a YouTube like Guy Kawasaki or Seth Golden who is another one of these gurus of marketing or anybody who has anything to say -- Steve Kaufmann talking about language learning – it doesn't matter, if I don't like him or her she's gone; she's gone. I am not a prisoner of that person. That person has to try to capture my attention early,

Jill: …right away;

Steve: probably has to say it fairly soon because after three minutes -- even if she's good -- I'm gone, probably. You know, what else is there out there? I'm not going to spend my whole afternoon listening to one person. So, that's a totally different discipline and it enables you to…like I can now with Google Reader I can get feeds from people that I think have something to say whether it be in writing or a video. They may not have something useful to say everyday and the day they are not interesting I just shut them off and I go to someone else. That's an awfully good discipline.

The public speaker has an audience. The audience is not going to go away; however, the audience can turn their mind off. I can check my BlackBerry. I can start doodling about new ideas for The Linguist so I can make Mark's life more difficult. So, I think it is very…I just came away from that…first of all, Guy Kawasaki's idea stuck in my mind: max 20 minutes; max 10 slides; maximum. When I say max it's maximum 10 slides; maximum 20 minutes; large font; a few points on the PowerPoint. Don't write a book on the PowerPoint. People can't read it and they start losing it. So those are some simple ideas. So, I think, you know, if we're in a sales presentation or any other sort of presentation I think the idea of having a few simple ideas that are delivered early and that you keep it short I think these are good ideas. Now, let me ask you, were you required at university to make speeches or presentations?

Jill: Yeah, I was. I think mostly in…I'm just trying to remember now…in my French classes for sure. In all the French literature classes there was always at least one presentation per class per semester.

Steve: What would your presentation be on?

Jill: You know, I can't even really remember. Some of them were group present projects; presentations. Others were things, you know, something I had to prepare on my own and I honestly…obviously it didn't stick with me very long but I can't even really remember what sorts of things I talked about. I wasn't really that interested. So, I did have to do them. I had to do them for my psychology courses as well which was more interesting to me because you've got theories you can talk about and, you know, you learn about different things. So, those ones I actually enjoyed them.

I mean in one of my psychology courses we had a choice between writing a paper…which I hate; I hate writing…so, we could write a paper or we could do an oral presentation. And I think out of the however many people were in my course, myself and maybe two other people, chose to do the presentation because most people are afraid of public speaking. And I thought are you kidding me. All I have to do is go up and stand up there for ten minutes and…sure you have to prepare, you have to think, you have to know what you are going to say but I don't know, whatever…I was up there for maybe 10 minutes maybe 15 minutes as opposed to having to write a 10 or 15 page essay and I thought that was just the greatest thing. I was so happy to have that option. After having done so many presentations and in French which is so much harder than doing it in my native language that was just a piece of cake for me. And I think that we were graded easier too because there were only a few of us that were brave enough to do this. So, I never really had a problem with public speaking but I haven't done it now for a long time so I think to do it now would probably cause me a little bit more anxiety.

Steve: Well that's interesting. Why? Because maybe we'll have to get you to do some presentations on The Linguist. Why would you have greater anxiety now than you had as a student?

Jill: Because I'm out of practice. I'm not used to speaking to groups of people anymore. So for a period of time there, for several years, I had to do it quite often; every year. I haven't had to do it for quite a few years now so I'm not so comfortable anymore.

Steve: Okay. But, again, as you say it's probably just a matter of getting used to it like so many things and maybe when you do you'll be guided by the principles of Guy Kawasaki. And, you know…well, I've said before that I don't necessarily believe in all these 10 best ways to do this and 8 ways to be happy and so forth but there is a lot of good information on the Internet. You have to sort through it but there are some people with some very useful advice and it's free. You don't have to buy a book; it's free. And I think if I wanted to look up public speaking or presentations I could probably find a lot of free and very useful information by people who have other motives like Guy Kawasaki. He likes to promote his blog and his podcast. I don't fully understand the business model but he sells books and he's a public speaker and whatever. It doesn't matter but as part of that he offers a lot of information free.

We at LingQ also off a lot of ideas, information, content and a whole bunch of stuff free as part of our whole business model because in the long run we would like more people to find out about us; to come and see for themselves and hopefully sign up and study with us.

Okay. Well, that was just a brief chat about public speaking. Again, given that people only remember the first little bit I'm not sure what people will take from this discussion but there you go. Thanks, Jill.

Jill: Thanks. See you soon.


Sixty-one: Public Speaking

Steve: Hi, Jill.

Jill: Hi, again.

Steve: You know, I want to talk a little bit about public speaking.

I mentioned this on my blog but last night I was at a dinner. It was the annual meeting of the Japan-Canada Chamber of Commerce and I didn’t realize this but we had our meeting from 6 to 7. C'était la réunion annuelle de la Chambre de commerce Japon-Canada et je ne m'en étais pas rendu compte mais nous avons eu notre réunion du 6 au 7. 日カナダ商工会議所の年次総会で、私はこれを理解していませんでしたが、6時から7時までの会合がありました。 The Chairman of the Chamber had arranged for the Consul General, the Japanese Consul General, to come and speak at 7 o’clock to the members and then at 7:30 the barbeque was going to begin on the garden terrace of a very nice hotel. Le Président de la Chambre s'était arrangé pour que le Consul Général, le Consul Général du Japon, vienne parler à 19h00 aux membres puis à 19h30 le barbecue allait commencer sur la terrasse du jardin d'un très bel hôtel . 商工会議所の議長は、日本総領事館が7時にメンバーと話しに来て、7時30分にとても素敵なホテルのガーデンテラスでバーベキューを始めるように手配しました。 。 Sounds like a nice evening? 素敵な夜のように聞こえますか?

Jill: Sure does. ジル:もちろんです。

Steve: Alright. スティーブ:わかりました。 Our Chairman managed to keep the Consul General waiting for half an hour which to me is unbelievable; unbelievable that you would invite the Consul or anyone…invite them to speak to your group and keep them waiting while you dealt with internal matters. Notre président a réussi à faire attendre le consul général pendant une demi-heure, ce qui pour moi est incroyable ; incroyable que vous invitiez le consul ou qui que ce soit… les invitez à parler à votre groupe et faites-les attendre pendant que vous traitez des affaires internes. 私の議長は、総領事館を30分待って私を信じられないようにしていました。あなたが領事や他の人を招待することは信じられません...彼らにあなたのグループに話をして、内的な事柄を扱っている間待っておいてください。 It’s just not done. I don’t care if it’s your general meeting or a meeting where you are having coffee at home with your friends you just don’t invite someone and keep them waiting. Je me fiche que ce soit votre assemblée générale ou une réunion où vous prenez un café à la maison avec vos amis, vous n'invitez tout simplement pas quelqu'un et vous le faites attendre. それがあなたの総会であるか、あなたが友人と家でコーヒーを飲んでいる会議であるかどうかは関係ありません。あなたはただ誰かを招待せず、彼らを待たせます。

Jill: No.

Steve: Common courtesy. スティーブ:一般的な礼儀。

Jill: Right. ジル:そうだね。

Steve: That’s an expression. スティーブ:それは表現です。

Jill: Common courtesy, yes.

Steve: Common courtesy.

You can also talk about common sense. 常識について話すこともできます。

Jill: Which a lot of people don’t have. ジル:多くの人が持っていないものです。

Steve: So, we’re now a half hour late. Steve : Donc, nous avons maintenant une demi-heure de retard. スティーブ:それで、私たちは今30分遅れています。 At this point, I’m hungry. この時点で、私はお腹が空いています。 Okay? わかった? It’s 7:30 and suddenly I’m told we have the Consul General here to talk to us. 7時半ですが、突然、総領事がここにいると言われました。 I had invited my wife and another couple to the barbeque because this was open to other people so now they have to wait for the Consul General to give his speech. J'avais invité ma femme et un autre couple au barbecue parce que c'était ouvert à d'autres personnes, alors maintenant ils doivent attendre que le consul général prononce son discours. 妻と別のカップルをバーベキューに招待しました。これは他の人にも開かれているため、今では総領事がスピーチをするのを待たなければなりません。 So the Consul General then came and spoke in Japanese, which is fine, with English slides and he spoke for 45 minutes. Le consul général est donc venu et a parlé en japonais, ce qui est bien, avec des diapositives en anglais et il a parlé pendant 45 minutes. それで総領事は来て日本語で話しましたが、それは英語のスライドで大丈夫です、そして彼は45分間話しました。 So, what I’m leading to is I came across on the Internet a blog post, which is also in YouTube, by a person called Guy Kawasaki. だから私が導いているのは、ガイ・カワサキという人物がYouTubeにもあるブログ・ポストをインターネットで見つけたということです。 Have you heard of Guy Kawasaki? ガイ・カワサキのことを聞いたことがありますか?

Jill: No, no I haven’t. ジル:いや、いや、私はしていません。

Steve: Guy Kawasaki is very famous. スティーブ:ガイ・カワサキはとても有名です。 He writes books on how to make money and how to be successful and how to do everything you ever wanted to do. 彼はお金を稼ぐ方法と成功する方法とあなたが今までやりたかったことすべてをする方法についての本を書いています。

Jill: I don’t read those kind of books. ジル:私はそのような本を読んでいません。

Steve: Okay. スティーブ:わかりました。 No, I don’t either but I found this and he gave a…in fact, I saw this YouTube and what he said basically was that if you are ever giving a presentation you have the 10-20-30 rule. Non, moi non plus, mais j'ai trouvé ceci et il a donné un… en fait, j'ai vu ce YouTube et ce qu'il a dit essentiellement, c'est que si vous faites une présentation, vous avez la règle 10-20-30. いいえ、私はどちらかというと私はこれを見つけず、彼が与えた...実際には、私はこのYouTubeを見て、彼が基本的に言ったことは、あなたが今までにプレゼンテーションをしているなら、あなたは10-20-30のルールを持っています。 Ten is the maximum number of PowerPoint slides. Dix est le nombre maximum de diapositives PowerPoint. PowerPointスライドの最大数は10です。 No more than 10; very, very good suggestion. 10以下;非常に、非常に良い提案。 The 20 refers to 20 minutes. Le 20 fait référence à 20 minutes. 20は20分を意味します。 Never speak longer than for 20 minutes and the 30 refers to the 30 point, you know, fonts – font points – whatever; make it big. Ne parlez jamais plus longtemps que 20 minutes et le 30 fait référence au point 30, vous savez, les polices – les points de police – peu importe ; faire grand. 20分以上話さないでください。30は30ポイントを指します、ご存知のとおり、フォント–フォントポイント–何でも。それを大きくする。 Two advantages: 1) there’s less for people to read and 2) they can read it. Deux avantages : 1) les gens ont moins à lire et 2) ils peuvent le lire. 2つの利点:1)人々が読むことが少なくなることと2)彼らがそれを読むことができること。

Jill: They can see it. ジル:彼らはそれを見ることができます。

Steve: So as I sat there listening to this Consul General drone on about things that were of no interest to anyone I just kept on saying to myself 10-20-30. Steve : Alors que j'étais assis là à écouter ce consul général bourdonner à propos de choses qui n'intéressaient personne, je n'arrêtais pas de me dire 10-20-30. スティーブ:それで、私がそこに座って、この総領事館のドローンを聞いて、誰にも興味がないことについて、私は自分自身に10-20-30と言い続けました。 So, that’s my first comment. それが私の最初のコメントです。 What is your reaction to all of that? そのすべてに対するあなたの反応はどうですか?

Jill: I don’t know what I would have done. Jill : Je ne sais pas ce que j'aurais fait. ジル:何をしたかわからない。 I would have been starving and you probably didn’t eat until 9 o’clock. J'aurais été affamé et tu n'as probablement pas mangé avant 9 heures. 私は飢えていたでしょう、そしてあなたはおそらく9時まで食べなかったでしょう。

Steve: 8:30. スティーブ:8:30。 8:30; the sun had gone down. 8:30;太陽が沈んだ。 We were going to have a nice sunset barbeque and we ended up with a barbeque in the dark. Nous allions faire un bon barbecue au coucher du soleil et nous nous sommes retrouvés avec un barbecue dans le noir. 私たちは素敵な日没のバーベキューをするつもりでした。そして、私たちは暗闇の中でバーベキューで終わりました。

Jill: See, I wouldn’t be too anxious to go back to another one of those meetings. Jill : Vous voyez, je ne serais pas trop pressée de retourner à une autre de ces réunions. ジル:ほら、あの会議の別の会議に戻るのはそれほど心配していません。

Steve: So, I think the thing about public speaking is…a couple of things that sort of stuck with me there: one is the need to simplify and so 20 minutes is max. スティーブ:だから、私は公衆の話すことは...私がそこにいるようなものがいくつかあると思います.1つは簡素化する必要があるため、最大20分です。 Unless you’re a member of the communist party of some country where you can talk for six hours 20 minutes is max. Sauf si vous êtes membre du parti communiste d'un pays où vous pouvez parler pendant six heures et 20 minutes, c'est maximum. あなたが6時間20分話すことができるある国の共産党のメンバーでない限り、最大です。 The second thing I noticed was in that YouTube of Guy Kawasaki and others that I’ve seen on the Internet I find that I only remember what they said at the beginning. La deuxième chose que j'ai remarquée, c'est que dans ce YouTube de Guy Kawasaki et d'autres que j'ai vus sur Internet, je constate que je ne me souviens que de ce qu'ils ont dit au début. 次に気付いたのは、インターネットで見たガイ・カワサキらのYouTubeで、最初に言ったことしか覚えていないことに気づきました。 Have you had that experience? その経験はありますか?

Jill: Yeah. I mean I even think back to university courses where the teachers are up there lecturing and your attention span only lasts so long. Je veux dire, je repense même aux cours universitaires où les professeurs donnent des cours et votre capacité d'attention ne dure qu'un temps. 私は教師がそこで講義をしているあなたの注意のスパンが長続きする大学のコースに戻って考えることさえ意味します。 That’s why a lot of the classes were 50 minute classes which is still a long time but then you get into the two hour classes and sure you get a five minute break or something but most people I think are thinking about other things. C'est pourquoi beaucoup de cours étaient des cours de 50 minutes, ce qui est encore long, mais ensuite vous entrez dans les cours de deux heures et vous obtenez bien sûr une pause de cinq minutes ou quelque chose comme ça, mais je pense que la plupart des gens pensent à d'autres choses. だから、たくさんのクラスが50分のクラスだったのですが、まだ長い時間ですが、2時間のクラスに入ると、5分の休憩を取ることができますが、他のことを考えている人はほとんどいます。

Steve: You know, I think too if you are in class you know you have to learn about what the professor is talking about because you have to write an exam. Steve : Vous savez, je pense aussi que si vous êtes en classe, vous savez que vous devez apprendre de quoi parle le professeur parce que vous devez passer un examen. スティーブ:もしあなたがクラスにいたら、あなたは試験を書く必要があるので、教授が何を話しているのかを知る必要があると思います。

Jill: Except for you also know that with a lot of professors they are just basically verbatim repeating what’s in your textbook so you know you can just go read your textbook and find out all the same information. Jill : Sauf que vous savez aussi qu'avec beaucoup de professeurs, ils ne font que répéter textuellement ce qu'il y a dans votre manuel, vous savez donc que vous pouvez simplement aller lire votre manuel et trouver toutes les mêmes informations. ジル:あなたを除いて、多くの教授は基本的に教科書の内容を逐語的に繰り返しているので、教科書を読んで同じ情報をすべて見つけることができます。

Steve: But it made me think, you know. スティーブ:しかし、それは私に考えさせました、あなたは知っています。 I sat there listening to the Consul General for 45 minutes. 私はそこに座って総領事館を45分間聞いていました。 I mean, I was a prisoner, right? Je veux dire, j'étais un prisonnier, n'est-ce pas ? つまり、私は囚人でしたよね? I couldn’t leave. 私は去ることができませんでした。 He had me. Il m'a eu. 彼は私を持っていた。 We’re captive. 私たちは捕らえられています。 I don’t have to listen. Je n'ai pas à écouter. 私は聞く必要はありません。 I probably could close my eyes but that would be impolite so I’m stuck. Je pourrais probablement fermer les yeux mais ce serait impoli donc je suis coincé. 私はおそらく私の目を閉じることができますが、それは無頓着なので、私は立ち往生しています。 But if I go on the Internet and I’ve now got this Google Reader set up so I’m getting these feeds from different blogs and podcast and whatever…say I’m reading something or I can look at a YouTube like Guy Kawasaki or Seth Golden who is another one of these gurus of marketing or anybody who has anything to say -- Steve Kaufmann talking about language learning – it doesn’t matter, if I don’t like him or her she’s gone; she’s gone. Mais si je vais sur Internet et que j'ai maintenant configuré ce lecteur Google, je reçois ces flux de différents blogs et podcasts et peu importe… disons que je lis quelque chose ou que je peux regarder un YouTube comme Guy Kawasaki ou Seth Golden qui est un autre de ces gourous du marketing ou quiconque a quelque chose à dire -- Steve Kaufmann parle de l'apprentissage des langues – peu importe, si je ne l'aime pas, elle est partie ; elle est partie. しかし、私がインターネットに接続すれば、私は今このGoogle Readerをセットアップして、別のブログやポッドキャストなどからフィードを入手しています。何かを読んでいるとか、ガイ川崎やマーケティングの誰かの誰かが言いたいことがあるセス・ゴールデン - スティーブ・カウフマンは語学学習について語っています - もし私が彼や彼女が行ったことが気に入らなければ、それは問題ではありません。彼女が逝ってしまった。 I am not a prisoner of that person. 私はその人の囚人ではない。 That person has to try to capture my attention early, その人は私の注意を早く捕まえなければならない、

Jill: …right away; ジル:…すぐに;

Steve: probably has to say it fairly soon because after three minutes -- even if she’s good -- I’m gone, probably. Steve : doit probablement le dire assez tôt parce qu'après trois minutes -- même si elle est bonne -- je suis parti, probablement. スティーブ:3分後、たとえ彼女がいいことがあっても、おそらくすぐにそれを言わなければならないでしょう。 You know, what else is there out there? Vous savez, qu'est-ce qu'il y a d'autre là-bas? あなたが知っている、そこに他に何がありますか? I’m not going to spend my whole afternoon listening to one person. Je ne vais pas passer tout mon après-midi à écouter une seule personne. 私は午後中ずっと一人の人の話を聞くつもりはありません。 So, that’s a totally different discipline and it enables you to…like I can now with Google Reader I can get feeds from people that I think have something to say whether it be in writing or a video. Donc, c'est une discipline totalement différente et cela vous permet de… comme je le peux maintenant avec Google Reader, je peux obtenir des flux de personnes qui, selon moi, ont quelque chose à dire, que ce soit par écrit ou dans une vidéo. ですから、それはまったく異なる分野であり、それにより、次のことが可能になります…Googleリーダーでできるように、書面であろうとビデオであろうと、何か言いたいことがあると思う人々からフィードを受け取ることができます。 They may not have something useful to say everyday and the day they are not interesting I just shut them off and I go to someone else. Ils n'ont peut-être pas quelque chose d'utile à dire tous les jours et le jour où ils ne sont pas intéressants, je les coupe et je vais voir quelqu'un d'autre. 彼らは日常的に言い表すのに役立つ何かを持っていないかもしれません。面白くない日に私はそれらを止め、私は他の人に行きます。 That’s an awfully good discipline. C'est une très bonne discipline. それは非常に良い規律です。

The public speaker has an audience. 演説者には聴衆がいます。 The audience is not going to go away; however, the audience can turn their mind off. 聴衆は去るつもりはありません。しかし、聴衆は彼らの心をオフにすることができます。 I can check my BlackBerry. Je peux vérifier mon BlackBerry. BlackBerryを確認できます。 I can start doodling about new ideas for The Linguist so I can make Mark’s life more difficult. The Linguistの新しいアイデアについては、私はマークの人生をもっと難しくすることができます。 So, I think it is very…I just came away from that…first of all, Guy Kawasaki’s idea stuck in my mind: max 20 minutes; max 10 slides; maximum. When I say max it’s maximum 10 slides; maximum 20 minutes; large font; a few points on the PowerPoint. 私が最大と言うとき、それは最大10枚のスライドです。最大20分。大きいフォント; PowerPointのいくつかのポイント。 Don’t write a book on the PowerPoint. PowerPointで本を書かないでください。 People can’t read it and they start losing it. 人々はそれを読むことができず、彼らはそれを失い始めます。 So those are some simple ideas. だから、それらはいくつかの簡単なアイデアです。 So, I think, you know, if we’re in a sales presentation or any other sort of presentation I think the idea of having a few simple ideas that are delivered early and that you keep it short I think these are good ideas. 私たちがセールスプレゼンテーションや他のプレゼンテーションをしている場合、早期に配られる簡単なアイデアをいくつか持っていて、それを短くしておくのがよいアイデアだと思います。 Now, let me ask you, were you required at university to make speeches or presentations? さて、大学でスピーチやプレゼンテーションをする必要がありましたか?

Jill: Yeah, I was. ジル:ええ、そうです。 I think mostly in…I’m just trying to remember now…in my French classes for sure. 私は主に…私は今思い出そうとしているだけだと思います…確かに私のフランス語の授業で。 In all the French literature classes there was always at least one presentation per class per semester.

Steve: What would your presentation be on? スティーブ:あなたのプレゼンテーションは何ですか?

Jill: You know, I can’t even really remember. ジル:あなたが知っている、私は本当に覚えていません。 Some of them were group present projects; presentations. それらのうちのいくつかはグループ現在のプロジェクトでした。プレゼンテーション。 Others were things, you know, something I had to prepare on my own and I honestly…obviously it didn’t stick with me very long but I can’t even really remember what sorts of things I talked about. D'autres étaient des choses, vous savez, quelque chose que j'ai dû préparer moi-même et honnêtement… évidemment ça ne m'est pas resté très longtemps mais je ne me souviens même pas vraiment de quelles sortes de choses j'ai parlé. 他のものは私が自分で準備しなければならなかったことであり、私は正直なところ...私は非常に長い間私と付き合っていませんでしたが、私が話したことの種類は本当に思い出せません。 I wasn’t really that interested. Je n'étais pas vraiment intéressé. あまり興味がありませんでした。 So, I did have to do them. だから、私はそれらをしなければならなかった。 I had to do them for my psychology courses as well which was more interesting to me because you’ve got theories you can talk about and, you know, you learn about different things. Je devais aussi les faire pour mes cours de psychologie, ce qui m'intéressait davantage parce que vous avez des théories dont vous pouvez parler et, vous savez, vous apprenez différentes choses. 私は心理学のコースでもそれらをやらなければなりませんでした。それはあなたが話すことができる理論を持っていて、あなたが知っている、あなたはさまざまなことについて学ぶので、私にとってもっと興味深いものでした。 So, those ones I actually enjoyed them. だから、実際に楽しんだもの。

I mean in one of my psychology courses we had a choice between writing a paper…which I hate; I hate writing…so, we could write a paper or we could do an oral presentation. Je veux dire, dans l'un de mes cours de psychologie, nous avions le choix entre écrire un article… ce que je déteste ; Je déteste écrire… alors, on pourrait écrire un article ou on pourrait faire une présentation orale. つまり、私の心理学コースの1つで、論文を書くかどうかを選択できました…私は嫌いです。私は書くのが嫌いです…それで、私たちは論文を書くか、口頭発表をすることができました。 And I think out of the however many people were in my course, myself and maybe two other people, chose to do the presentation because most people are afraid of public speaking. Et je pense que sur le nombre de personnes présentes dans mon cours, moi-même et peut-être deux autres personnes, avons choisi de faire la présentation parce que la plupart des gens ont peur de parler en public. そして、私のコースにいた多くの人々のうち、私自身とおそらく他の2人が、ほとんどの人が人前で話すことを恐れているので、プレゼンテーションを行うことを選んだと思います。 And I thought are you kidding me. Et j'ai pensé que vous vous moquiez de moi. そして、私はあなたが私をからかっていると思いました。 All I have to do is go up and stand up there for ten minutes and…sure you have to prepare, you have to think, you have to know what you are going to say but I don’t know, whatever…I was up there for maybe 10 minutes maybe 15 minutes as opposed to having to write a 10 or 15 page essay and I thought that was just the greatest thing. Tout ce que j'ai à faire, c'est de monter et de rester là pendant dix minutes et… bien sûr, vous devez vous préparer, vous devez réfléchir, vous devez savoir ce que vous allez dire mais je ne sais pas, peu importe… j'étais debout là pendant peut-être 10 minutes peut-être 15 minutes au lieu d'avoir à écrire un essai de 10 ou 15 pages et j'ai pensé que c'était la meilleure chose. 私がしなければならないことは、10分間何か起き上がって立ち上がることです。準備する必要があると思います。あなたは何を言おうとしているのか知っていなければいけません。 10分または15ページのエッセイを書かなければならないのではなく、たぶん10分か15分かかります。それは単なる最大のものだと思いました。 I was so happy to have that option. J'étais si heureux d'avoir cette option. 私はそのオプションを持ってとても幸せでした。 After having done so many presentations and in French which is so much harder than doing it in my native language that was just a piece of cake for me. Après avoir fait tant de présentations et en français, ce qui est tellement plus difficile que de le faire dans ma langue maternelle, ce n'était qu'un jeu d'enfant pour moi. 私の母国語でそれをするよりもずっと難しいプレゼンテーションやフランス語で多くのプレゼンテーションをした後、それは私のためのケーキでした。 And I think that we were graded easier too because there were only a few of us that were brave enough to do this. Et je pense que nous avons été classés plus faciles aussi parce que seuls quelques-uns d'entre nous ont eu le courage de le faire. そして私は、これを行うのに十分な勇気があった私たちのほんの少数しかいなかったので、私たちはさらに容易に評価されたと思います。 So, I never really had a problem with public speaking but I haven’t done it now for a long time so I think to do it now would probably cause me a little bit more anxiety. Donc, je n'ai jamais vraiment eu de problème avec la prise de parole en public, mais je ne l'ai pas fait depuis longtemps, donc je pense que le faire maintenant me causerait probablement un peu plus d'anxiété. だから、私は演説では本当に問題はありませんでしたが、今はそれをずっとやっていないので、今やそうすると思うので、少し不安を感じるでしょう。

Steve: Well that’s interesting. スティーブ:それは興味深いですね。 Why? Because maybe we’ll have to get you to do some presentations on The Linguist. Parce qu'on devra peut-être vous faire faire des présentations sur The Linguist. おそらく、あなたはThe Linguistに関するいくつかのプレゼンテーションを行う必要があります。 Why would you have greater anxiety now than you had as a student? Pourquoi auriez-vous plus d'anxiété maintenant que lorsque vous étiez étudiant ? あなたはなぜ生徒として持っていたよりも今より大きな不安を抱いていますか?

Jill: Because I’m out of practice. ジル:私は実践していないから。 I’m not used to speaking to groups of people anymore. 私はもう人のグループに話すことに慣れていない。 So for a period of time there, for several years, I had to do it quite often; every year. Alors pendant un certain temps là-bas, pendant plusieurs années, j'ai dû le faire assez souvent; chaque année. そのため、そこでしばらくの間、数年間、私はそれをかなり頻繁に行わなければなりませんでした。毎年。 I haven’t had to do it for quite a few years now so I’m not so comfortable anymore.

Steve: Okay. But, again, as you say it’s probably just a matter of getting used to it like so many things and maybe when you do you’ll be guided by the principles of Guy Kawasaki. Mais, encore une fois, comme vous le dites, c'est probablement juste une question de s'y habituer comme tant de choses et peut-être que lorsque vous le ferez, vous serez guidé par les principes de Guy Kawasaki. しかし、繰り返しになりますが、あなたが言うように、それはおそらく多くのことのようにそれに慣れることの問題であり、おそらくあなたがそうするとき、あなたはガイ・カワサキの原則に導かれるでしょう。 And, you know…well, I’ve said before that I don’t necessarily believe in all these 10 best ways to do this and 8 ways to be happy and so forth but there is a lot of good information on the Internet. Et, vous savez… eh bien, j'ai déjà dit que je ne crois pas nécessairement à toutes ces 10 meilleures façons de faire cela et 8 façons d'être heureux et ainsi de suite, mais il y a beaucoup de bonnes informations sur Internet. そして、あなたが知っていることは...まあ、私は前に、私はこれらのすべてのベストプラクティスと幸せになる8つの方法を必ずしも信じていないが、インターネット上に多くの良い情報があると言いました。 You have to sort through it but there are some people with some very useful advice and it’s free. Vous devez faire le tri, mais il y a des gens qui ont des conseils très utiles et c'est gratuit. You don’t have to buy a book; it’s free. 本を買う必要はありません。それは無料です。 And I think if I wanted to look up public speaking or presentations I could probably find a lot of free and very useful information by people who have other motives like Guy Kawasaki. パブリック・スピーキングやプレゼンテーションを見たいと思ったら、ガイ・カワサキのような動機を持っている人たちによって、多くの無料で非常に有用な情報が見つかるはずです。 He likes to promote his blog and his podcast. Il aime promouvoir son blog et son podcast. 彼は自分のブログとポッドキャストを宣伝するのが好きです。 I don’t fully understand the business model but he sells books and he’s a public speaker and whatever. 私はビジネスモデルを完全には理解していませんが、彼は本を販売していて、演説者など何でもしています。 It doesn’t matter but as part of that he offers a lot of information free. Cela n'a pas d'importance, mais dans le cadre de cela, il offre beaucoup d'informations gratuitement. それは問題ではありませんが、その一環として彼は多くの情報を無料で提供しています。

We at LingQ also off a lot of ideas, information, content and a whole bunch of stuff free as part of our whole business model because in the long run we would like more people to find out about us; to come and see for themselves and hopefully sign up and study with us. Chez LingQ, nous proposons également beaucoup d'idées, d'informations, de contenu et tout un tas de choses gratuites dans le cadre de notre modèle commercial, car à long terme, nous aimerions que plus de gens nous connaissent ; venir voir par eux-mêmes et, espérons-le, s'inscrire et étudier avec nous. また、LingQは、ビジネスモデル全体の一部として、多くのアイデア、情報、コンテンツ、およびすべてのものを無料で提供しています。長期的には、より多くの人々に私たちについて知ってもらいたいからです。来て自分の目で確かめ、できればサインアップして私たちと一緒に勉強してください。

Okay. Well, that was just a brief chat about public speaking. Eh bien, c'était juste une brève conversation sur la prise de parole en public. まあ、それは人前で話すことについての簡単なチャットでした。 Again, given that people only remember the first little bit I’m not sure what people will take from this discussion but there you go. Encore une fois, étant donné que les gens ne se souviennent que de la première partie, je ne sais pas ce que les gens retiendront de cette discussion, mais voilà. 繰り返しになりますが、人々は最初のほんの少ししか覚えていないので、この議論から人々が何をとるかはわかりませんが、あなたはそこに行きます。 Thanks, Jill.

Jill: Thanks. See you soon.