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English LingQ Podcast 1.0, Ninety-eight: Christmas Gifts

Ninety-eight: Christmas Gifts

Mark: Welcome back to the EnglishLingQ Podcast. Mark Kaufmann with Jill Soles today, as usual. I guess not every time, but…

Jill: …most of the time.

Mark: We are getting closer to Christmas. I know Jill you're quite anxious for Christmas morning, have you been a good girl?

Jill: Yes and I had a long, long, list and I better get everything on my list.

Mark: Did you send a letter to Santa?

Jill: Well, not this year, I didn't have time.

Mark: You didn't have time?

Jill: No, no, but I'll have to get on that for next year.

Mark: Well, you know, Santa is not a mind reader.

Jill: No, but Chris has explicit instructions. I told him the stores, the sizes, everything, so there are no excuses.

Mark: Wow! That's organization. I must say that lists like that are helpful, yes.

Jill: Well, this is what I thought and I gave my mom a list too. My mom is very good at picking stuff out for me. I find women, in general, there's more you can buy for women than for men.

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: Because, you know, women will wear jewelry or wear perfume or bath stuff or they like little pretty things.

Mark: Yeah, I would agree with that, but what's interesting is that I find my son much easier to buy for than my daughters. Like my daughters, I don't know what to get them; like it's hard. Him, any sports equipment, whatever, videogame, he's just happy. There's so much stuff I could buy for him.

Jill: Boys, you're right, for boys.

Mark: And girls, I don't know, I guess clothes and I don't know. I mean they play sports, but they're not…

Jill: …diehard…

Mark: …diehard keen on them and most videogames yeah, they'll play them, but they're not super keen on them.

Jill: Lots of little girls I know really love things like stuffed animals, Webkins, Barbies, My Little Pony and art supplies.

Mark: Yeah?

Jill: They like to be crafty and so, you know, that kind of stuff.

Mark: But we have so much of that stuff already, but yeah, they'll get more of that stuff, but you look for other things to get them.

Jill: Probably once they start getting a bit older, and even Annie being 10, a lot of girls start getting interested more in clothes and it is exciting for them to get new skirts and tops and pretty things they can wear to school.

Mark: Yeah and I think that's the case now even. She's starting to know what she wants to wear and look for stuff and ask for stuff.

Jill: Right.

Mark: Whereas Kyle, I mean I don't think he knows what he is wearing most of the time, you know; it's just different.

Jill: A t-shirt and a pair of pants and it doesn't really matter.

Mark: Yeah and whatever, hopefully, a jacket if he remembers, because it's cold out.

Jill: Yeah, but kids don't feel cold.

Mark: No.

Jill: They're immune.

Mark: He doesn't, his sisters certainly do. No, that is funny and I think you're right it's much easier to buy for women than for men. As you say, there are many more options, different things.

Jill: Yeah, I mean there's so many of these little stores around that have just knickknacks and trinkets and just little things and a lot of women like all that kind of stuff. It doesn't have to be functional.

Mark: No.

Jill: It doesn't have to be practical, it's just something sort of different, sort of pretty, unique, and women like that, but men have no time for stuff like that, in general.

Mark: No, pretty much, yeah.

Jill: And Chris has no time for me getting stuff like that either.

Mark: Does he have time for him getting you stuff like that?

Jill: No.

Mark: How about that?

Jill: No, no, no, because he hates clutter. He just doesn't want our house just full of little things which, actually, I kind of agree with now; I like that. My mom is always buying things. She loves to shop that's where I get it from and she's always, you know, every year too she decides she's got to change all her decorations and furniture and stuff and so she buys all these things and a lot of them aren't cheap.

Mark: Right.

Jill: Something, a statue sitting here and this is sitting there and it doesn't look cluttered. She doesn't go crazy, but she used to always buy me those kinds of things too for presents and I quite liked them, but now that I live with Chris and he's totally against them, he's banned those sorts of things, I realize yeah, actually, I don't have any use for this just to go and this thing to sit here and collect dust. I don't like to dust. I don't need more things that are going to collect dust.

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: So, I sort of understand that and so my mom this year did buy me…I wanted a food processor, actually, and an apron.

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: So, she bought me those things.

Mark: Nice. Did you tell her that, you know, maybe this year to hold off on the knickknacks?

Jill: Well, yeah, I told her a couple years ago, no more knickknacks and so this year she did end up giving us this heavy, beautiful, sort of statue I guess, of course, of a mother holding a baby. You know, she's very into that sort of thing. As she gave it to me she said “Now, I know you guys don't like this kind of thing, so if you don't like it give it back to me because I love it and I'll keep it.”

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: I mean I do like it, but…

Mark: You gave it back to her.

Jill: No, we kept it. I mean right now in our place we just don't have room. We don't even have a proper bedroom for the baby. It's just like a small office, so we're not going to be setting up a whole bunch of things in there. Eventually, when we move, we'll put it in the baby's room somewhere.

Mark: Yeah, no, actually, we don't have much in the way of knickknacks either. Kindrey's not big on knickknacks and I'm certainly not, so we don't have that problem with collecting knickknacks; although, Kindrey's I guess step-mom has given us some very strange knickknacks the last couple Christmases, I guess. One in particular stands out. She's an artist and she's involved in the arts community in Squamish, which is a town 45 minutes from here. They live nearby, they live in Furry Creek.

Jill: This is Kindrey's dad?

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: I thought they lived in Calgary.

Mark: No, he finished off working in Calgary, but they always have had a place here at Furry Creek.

Jill: Oh, okay.

Mark: Now they're basically here and they spend some time in Calgary, but mostly they're here. At any rate, yeah, she gave us like a copper…it looks like a basket-weave type of copper thing.

Jill: It's like a copper basket?

Mark: Strips of copper woven together into like this lump of stuff. It's just horrible.

It's just what is that?

Jill: So is that the gift you bring out only when they come to visit?

Mark: Pretty much.

Jill: And you bring it out to make it seem like you actually use it?

Mark: Yeah, exactly. It's like what is that? You don't want to be rude, but I mean it's one thing to be artistic and to like different artsy stuff, but that, I mean, it's truly…my inclination is just to melt it down so, you know, at least it can…

Jill: …be used for something else?

Mark: It's truly amazing.

Jill: That's the problem with very unique or very artsy-type things is you really need to know somebody's taste and people have very different taste.

Mark: You know, people often say don't buy other people art.

Jill: No and you shouldn't buy other people perfume, unless you know the one that they wear, because scents are so different on different people and some people really have bad reactions to certain smells and there's just things that you just shouldn't buy for other people.

Mark: And most people like particular perfumes and don't like, strongly dislike, in fact, others.

Jill: Exactly.

Mark: Well, we get the garbage truck in the background.

Jill: It's a little loud today.

Mark: It is.

Jill: So, yeah, you have to be careful with presents.

Mark: For sure.

Jill: Don't waste your money. I mean I'd rather somebody gave me nothing.

Mark: Totally, absolutely, I mean now we feel like we have to keep this thing out on display when it's just, honestly, a total eyesore.

Jill: It's hideous.

Mark: It's terrible and, in fact, I think it's like spray painted a bit.

Jill: It's got the gold spray paint?

Mark: No, it's like a blue or maybe that's just a discoloration of the copper, but I don't even think it is. Actually, I think it was spray painted to look like discoloration of the copper. It's just horrible.

Jill: And who knows, she might have even spent quite a lot on it.

Mark: I'm sure it cost something, yeah.

Jill: It wouldn't have been twenty bucks, probably.

Mark: No, probably not, you know.

Jill: You know what, if ever in doubt, just give a woman chocolates. I mean you can't go wrong with that.

Mark: I think pretty much most people, give them chocolates.

Jill: Yeah, even men.

Mark: Very rarely, oh darn, a box of chocolates. You don't hear that very often.

Jill: No, no, so.

Mark: When a box of chocolates shows up in the office it doesn't linger very long.

Jill: No kidding, even if there's only two women here, the box will be gone pretty quick.

Mark: I don't think it's just the women eating the chocolate.

Jill: No, that's what I'm saying, even if there are only two women, the box is still gone pretty quick when the rest are men.

Mark: For sure, for sure. One thing I was going to ask you, you mentioned that your place is kind of small and you don't have a room for the baby, what are you going to do?

Jill: Well, as Chris points out frequently…

Mark: Here we go.

Jill: Being the practical, engineer-type that he is, our place is still much bigger than what most people have in the world and that most people live in places as big or much smaller than ours with whole families and they do just fine. This is certainly the case, I think. We have people making faces at us right now in the office, sorry.

Mark: Very childish.

Jill: Very childish people we work with here. But, anyway, so I mean it's not bad, our place is pretty close to 1,000 square feet. No, maybe I'm wrong, about 900 square feet and a big huge rooftop deck, so it's not a small, small, apartment.

Mark: Right.

Jill: You know, the living room is really big, so yeah, with one kid we could certainly stay there.

Mark: Right.

Jill: Like I said, there's a small office that we've cleaned out and we can fit a crib in there and we can fit a little dresser or whatever and so that's fine.

Mark: You can fit a crib?

Jill: We can, yeah, we can fit a crib and, you know, maybe a little dresser and that's about it.

Mark: Right.

Jill: So, you know, that's fine for now, but we definitely are going to move into something bigger.

Mark: Right.

I mean, obviously, when the baby is small it's not like it's crawling around.

Jill: It doesn't need any room anyway.

Mark: No and, I guess, the argument that most people in the world…I don't know if that's true, but maybe it is. Having not done the research, but…

Jill: Most people don't live in 2-3-4,000 thousand square foot houses like we live in.

Mark: No, for sure.

Jill: I think that's his point is that you don't need to expect that much, because you're not getting it.

Mark: However, most people here do.

Jill: Yeah, that's kind of what we're used to.

Mark: We don't live in the world, we live here.

Jill: Right.

Mark: You know?

Jill: Yeah, yeah.

Mark: I'm giving you some ammunition.

Jill: Yes, thank you. I've already told him as much, but no, you know what, honestly, I don't want a big house because I'm not interested in cleaning. I don't want to be cleaning a whole bunch of bathrooms. I absolutely hate it and I don't want to be heating a bunch of rooms we don't use, it's wasteful and I don't want a 3,000 square foot house, I absolutely don't.

Mark: Yeah, in actual fact, it's not that much more wasteful if the house is properly insulated.

Jill: Yeah, I guess that's true, but I don't feel that I need that much room. I never had a house that was that big and I never felt like I needed more.

Mark: No.

Jill: So, I don't have any big desire to have a huge house. I just want a nice little house that is big enough that gives us enough room.

Mark: Yeah, I often feel and, as you say, it's not the size of the house, but when I was growing up we lived in a house with a yard on a street where you could run around and play. I know in much of the world most people live in apartments and you're in an apartment condo-type of a situation there and so yeah, that's fine too. I've lived in apartments as a kid and it's fine. You go and do your thing on the street and whatever, but it's nicer to have a yard and to be in a neighborhood.

Jill: And nice for parents to let their kids just go out in the yard and you don't have to worry about them.

Mark: Exactly.

Jill: In our place, fortunately, we live so close to so many parks and the beach and so it's not like we're a long way off, a long ways away from good places for them to play at, but then you still have to take them there.

Mark: Right.

Jill: It's not like you can just let them go out in the yard.

Mark: It's busier; it's in the city, yeah.

Jill: Yeah, exactly.

So, you know, if we could buy a house in the area that we live in we would actually stay in that area.

Mark: Right.

Jill: But, I mean the cheapest house over there is a million dollars and that's for this tiny lot that has a house that you have to teardown and build on.

Mark: Right.

Jill: And the lots over there are much, much, smaller than the lots over here.

Mark: Right.

Well, that's the thing, in any city the closer you are to the center of the city then it's more expensive and you get less room.

Jill: Yeah, exactly.

Mark: That's just how it is, so if you're away from the center a little bit then you get more room.

Jill: Yeah, so yeah, I think, you know, we're definitely going to be looking in the New Year, but we're not in a huge rush and, at this point, I'm six months pregnant now.

Mark: For sure.

Jill: I don't know, to start moving now and to have a home that we're going to want to do maybe some renovations to or whatever, I just don't really want to get into that right now.

Mark: And, as you say, your child is not going to be requiring that room any time soon, nor are you likely to have it go outside and play on its own any time soon.

Jill: No.

I've got the deck for that. If it won't shut up I just lock it upstairs on the deck.

Mark: Exactly.

Well, that's good, that's something to look forward to.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: That's good. With that, I think we'll probably wrap her up.

Jill: Alright and I guess we will…

Mark: Over the Christmas period we'll try and keep putting out the podcasts. We may do some sort of in advance and play them sort of later, so they may not be actual up-to-the-minute like always.

Jill: They'll be there nonetheless.

Mark: They'll be there nonetheless and, with that, we'll sign off.

Jill: Bye, bye.


Ninety-eight: Christmas Gifts

Mark: Welcome back to the EnglishLingQ Podcast. Mark Kaufmann with Jill Soles today, as usual. Mark Kaufmann con Jill Soles hoy, como siempre. I guess not every time, but… Supongo que no siempre, pero ...

Jill: …most of the time. Jill:… la mayor parte del tiempo.

Mark: We are getting closer to Christmas. Mark: Nos estamos acercando a la Navidad. I know Jill you’re quite anxious for Christmas morning, have you been a good girl? Sé que Jill estás bastante ansiosa por la mañana de Navidad, ¿has sido una buena chica?

Jill: Yes and I had a long, long, list and I better get everything on my list. Jill: Sí, y tenía una lista muy, muy larga, y será mejor que tenga todo en mi lista.

Mark: Did you send a letter to Santa?

Jill: Well, not this year, I didn’t have time.

Mark: You didn’t have time?

Jill: No, no, but I’ll have to get on that for next year. Jill: No, no, pero tendré que hacerlo el año que viene.

Mark: Well, you know, Santa is not a mind reader. Mark: Bueno, ya sabes, Santa no es un lector de mentes.

Jill: No, but Chris has explicit instructions. Jill : Non, mais Chris a des instructions explicites. I told him the stores, the sizes, everything, so there are no excuses. Je lui ai dit les magasins, les tailles, tout, donc il n'y a pas d'excuses.

Mark: Wow! That’s organization. I must say that lists like that are helpful, yes.

Jill: Well, this is what I thought and I gave my mom a list too. Jill: Bueno, esto es lo que pensé y también le di a mi mamá una lista. Jill : Eh bien, c'est ce que je pensais et j'ai aussi donné une liste à ma mère. My mom is very good at picking stuff out for me. Mi mamá es muy buena eligiendo cosas para mí. Ma mère est très douée pour choisir des trucs pour moi. I find women, in general, there’s more you can buy for women than for men. Encuentro mujeres, en general, se puede comprar más para mujeres que para hombres. Je trouve que les femmes, en général, il y a plus que vous pouvez acheter pour les femmes que pour les hommes.

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: Because, you know, women will wear jewelry or wear perfume or bath stuff or they like little pretty things.

Mark: Yeah, I would agree with that, but what’s interesting is that I find my son much easier to buy for than my daughters. Mark : Oui, je serais d'accord avec ça, mais ce qui est intéressant, c'est que je trouve mon fils beaucoup plus facile à acheter que mes filles. Like my daughters, I don’t know what to get them; like it’s hard. Comme mes filles, je ne sais pas quoi leur offrir; comme si c'était dur. Him, any sports equipment, whatever, videogame, he’s just happy. Lui, n'importe quel équipement de sport, peu importe, jeu vidéo, il est juste heureux. There’s so much stuff I could buy for him. Hay tantas cosas que podría comprarle. Il y a tellement de choses que je pourrais lui acheter.

Jill: Boys, you’re right, for boys. Jill : Les garçons, tu as raison, pour les garçons.

Mark: And girls, I don’t know, I guess clothes and I don’t know. I mean they play sports, but they’re not…

Jill: …diehard…

Mark: …diehard keen on them and most videogames yeah, they’ll play them, but they’re not super keen on them.

Jill: Lots of little girls I know really love things like stuffed animals, Webkins, Barbies, My Little Pony and art supplies. Jill: A muchas niñas pequeñas que conozco les encantan cosas como peluches, Webkins, Barbies, My Little Pony y materiales de arte. Jill: Veel kleine meisjes die ik ken, houden echt van dingen zoals knuffels, Webkins, Barbies, My Little Pony en kunstbenodigdheden.

Mark: Yeah?

Jill: They like to be crafty and so, you know, that kind of stuff. Jill: Les gusta ser astutos y, ya sabes, ese tipo de cosas. Jill : Ils aiment être rusés et donc, vous savez, ce genre de choses.

Mark: But we have so much of that stuff already, but yeah, they’ll get more of that stuff, but you look for other things to get them. Mark: Pero ya tenemos muchas de esas cosas, pero sí, obtendrán más de esas cosas, pero buscas otras cosas para obtenerlas. Mark : Mais nous avons déjà tellement de choses de ce genre, mais oui, ils en auront plus, mais vous cherchez d'autres choses pour les obtenir.

Jill: Probably once they start getting a bit older, and even Annie being 10, a lot of girls start getting interested more in clothes and it is exciting for them to get new skirts and tops and pretty things they can wear to school.

Mark: Yeah and I think that’s the case now even. Mark : Ouais et je pense que c'est même le cas maintenant. She’s starting to know what she wants to wear and look for stuff and ask for stuff.

Jill: Right.

Mark: Whereas Kyle, I mean I don’t think he knows what he is wearing most of the time, you know; it’s just different. Mark : Alors que Kyle, je veux dire, je ne pense pas qu'il sache ce qu'il porte la plupart du temps, vous savez ; c'est juste différent.

Jill: A t-shirt and a pair of pants and it doesn’t really matter. Jill: Una camiseta y un pantalón y realmente no importa.

Mark: Yeah and whatever, hopefully, a jacket if he remembers, because it’s cold out. Mark: Sí y lo que sea, con suerte, una chaqueta si recuerda, porque hace frío. Mark : Ouais et peu importe, avec un peu de chance, une veste s'il s'en souvient, parce qu'il fait froid dehors.

Jill: Yeah, but kids don’t feel cold. Jill : Ouais, mais les enfants n'ont pas froid.

Mark: No.

Jill: They’re immune.

Mark: He doesn’t, his sisters certainly do. Mark : Il ne le fait pas, ses sœurs le font certainement. No, that is funny and I think you’re right it’s much easier to buy for women than for men. As you say, there are many more options, different things.

Jill: Yeah, I mean there’s so many of these little stores around that have just knickknacks and trinkets and just little things and a lot of women like all that kind of stuff. It doesn’t have to be functional.

Mark: No.

Jill: It doesn’t have to be practical, it’s just something sort of different, sort of pretty, unique, and women like that, but men have no time for stuff like that, in general. Jill : Ça n'a pas besoin d'être pratique, c'est juste quelque chose de différent, de joli, d'unique, et les femmes aiment ça, mais les hommes n'ont pas le temps pour ce genre de choses, en général.

Mark: No, pretty much, yeah.

Jill: And Chris has no time for me getting stuff like that either. Jill: Y Chris tampoco tiene tiempo para que yo consiga cosas así. Jill : Et Chris n'a pas non plus le temps pour moi d'obtenir des trucs comme ça.

Mark: Does he have time for him getting you stuff like that? Mark : Est-ce qu'il a le temps pour lui de t'acheter des trucs comme ça ?

Jill: No.

Mark: How about that?

Jill: No, no, no, because he hates clutter. Jill: No, no, no, porque odia el desorden. He just doesn’t want our house just full of little things which, actually, I kind of agree with now; I like that. My mom is always buying things. She loves to shop that’s where I get it from and she’s always, you know, every year too she decides she’s got to change all her decorations and furniture and stuff and so she buys all these things and a lot of them aren’t cheap. Elle adore faire du shopping, c'est de là que je l'obtiens et elle est toujours, vous savez, chaque année aussi, elle décide qu'elle doit changer toutes ses décorations et ses meubles et tout et donc elle achète toutes ces choses et beaucoup d'entre elles ne sont pas bon marché.

Mark: Right.

Jill: Something, a statue sitting here and this is sitting there and it doesn’t look cluttered. Jill: Iets, een standbeeld dat hier zit en dit staat daar en het ziet er niet rommelig uit. She doesn’t go crazy, but she used to always buy me those kinds of things too for presents and I quite liked them, but now that I live with Chris and he’s totally against them, he’s banned those sorts of things, I realize yeah, actually, I don’t have any use for this just to go and this thing to sit here and collect dust. Elle ne devient pas folle, mais elle m'achetait toujours ce genre de choses aussi pour des cadeaux et je les aimais bien, mais maintenant que je vis avec Chris et qu'il est totalement contre eux, il a interdit ce genre de choses, je réalise ouais , en fait, je n'ai aucune utilité pour ça juste pour aller et cette chose pour m'asseoir ici et ramasser la poussière. I don’t like to dust. I don’t need more things that are going to collect dust.

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: So, I sort of understand that and so my mom this year did buy me…I wanted a food processor, actually, and an apron. Jill : Donc, je comprends en quelque sorte cela et donc ma mère m'a acheté cette année… Je voulais un robot culinaire, en fait, et un tablier.

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: So, she bought me those things.

Mark: Nice. Did you tell her that, you know, maybe this year to hold off on the knickknacks? Tu lui as dit ça, tu sais, peut-être cette année pour retenir les bibelots ? Heb je haar dat verteld, weet je, misschien dit jaar om de prullaria af te wachten?

Jill: Well, yeah, I told her a couple years ago, no more knickknacks and so this year she did end up giving us this heavy, beautiful, sort of statue I guess, of course, of a mother holding a baby. Jill : Eh bien, oui, je lui ai dit il y a quelques années, plus de bibelots et donc cette année, elle a fini par nous donner cette sorte de statue lourde et belle, je suppose, bien sûr, d'une mère tenant un bébé. You know, she’s very into that sort of thing. As she gave it to me she said “Now, I know you guys don’t like this kind of thing, so if you don’t like it give it back to me because I love it and I’ll keep it.” Quand elle me l'a donné, elle a dit : "Maintenant, je sais que vous n'aimez pas ce genre de choses, alors si vous n'aimez pas ça, rendez-le-moi parce que je l'aime et je le garderai."

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: I mean I do like it, but… Jill : Je veux dire, j'aime ça, mais...

Mark: You gave it back to her.

Jill: No, we kept it. I mean right now in our place we just don’t have room. Je veux dire qu'en ce moment, chez nous, nous n'avons tout simplement pas de place. We don’t even have a proper bedroom for the baby. It’s just like a small office, so we’re not going to be setting up a whole bunch of things in there. C'est comme un petit bureau, donc nous n'allons pas installer tout un tas de choses là-dedans. Eventually, when we move, we’ll put it in the baby’s room somewhere.

Mark: Yeah, no, actually, we don’t have much in the way of knickknacks either. Mark : Oui, non, en fait, nous n'avons pas beaucoup de bibelots non plus. Kindrey’s not big on knickknacks and I’m certainly not, so we don’t have that problem with collecting knickknacks; although, Kindrey’s I guess step-mom has given us some very strange knickknacks the last couple Christmases, I guess. One in particular stands out. Eén springt er in het bijzonder uit. She’s an artist and she’s involved in the arts community in Squamish, which is a town 45 minutes from here. C'est une artiste et elle est impliquée dans la communauté artistique de Squamish, une ville située à 45 minutes d'ici. They live nearby, they live in Furry Creek.

Jill: This is Kindrey’s dad? Jill : C'est le père de Kindrey ?

Mark: Yeah.

Jill: I thought they lived in Calgary.

Mark: No, he finished off working in Calgary, but they always have had a place here at Furry Creek. Mark : Non, il a fini de travailler à Calgary, mais ils ont toujours eu une place ici à Furry Creek.

Jill: Oh, okay.

Mark: Now they’re basically here and they spend some time in Calgary, but mostly they’re here. At any rate, yeah, she gave us like a copper…it looks like a basket-weave type of copper thing. En tout cas, ouais, elle nous a donné comme un cuivre… ça ressemble à un truc en cuivre de type vannerie.

Jill: It’s like a copper basket?

Mark: Strips of copper woven together into like this lump of stuff. It’s just horrible.

It’s just what is that?

Jill: So is that the gift you bring out only when they come to visit?

Mark: Pretty much.

Jill: And you bring it out to make it seem like you actually use it?

Mark: Yeah, exactly. It’s like what is that? You don’t want to be rude, but I mean it’s one thing to be artistic and to like different artsy stuff, but that, I mean, it’s truly…my inclination is just to melt it down so, you know, at least it can… Vous ne voulez pas être impoli, mais je veux dire que c'est une chose d'être artistique et d'aimer différents trucs artistiques, mais ça, je veux dire, c'est vraiment... mon penchant est juste de le faire fondre donc, vous savez, au moins ça boîte…

Jill: …be used for something else?

Mark: It’s truly amazing.

Jill: That’s the problem with very unique or very artsy-type things is you really need to know somebody’s taste and people have very different taste. Jill : C'est le problème avec les choses très uniques ou très artistiques, c'est que vous avez vraiment besoin de connaître les goûts de quelqu'un et que les gens ont des goûts très différents.

Mark: You know, people often say don’t buy other people art. Mark : Vous savez, les gens disent souvent de ne pas acheter d'art aux autres.

Jill: No and you shouldn’t buy other people perfume, unless you know the one that they wear, because scents are so different on different people and some people really have bad reactions to certain smells and there’s just things that you just shouldn’t buy for other people.

Mark: And most people like particular perfumes and don’t like, strongly dislike, in fact, others.

Jill: Exactly.

Mark: Well, we get the garbage truck in the background. Mark : Eh bien, nous avons le camion à ordures en arrière-plan.

Jill: It’s a little loud today. Jill : C'est un peu bruyant aujourd'hui.

Mark: It is.

Jill: So, yeah, you have to be careful with presents.

Mark: For sure.

Jill: Don’t waste your money. I mean I’d rather somebody gave me nothing.

Mark: Totally, absolutely, I mean now we feel like we have to keep this thing out on display when it’s just, honestly, a total eyesore. Mark: Absolut, absolut, ich meine, jetzt haben wir das Gefühl, dass wir dieses Ding ausstellen müssen, wenn es ehrlich gesagt nur ein totaler Schandfleck ist. Mark: Helemaal, absoluut, ik bedoel, nu hebben we het gevoel dat we dit ding buiten de deur moeten houden terwijl het eerlijk gezegd een doorn in het oog is.

Jill: It’s hideous.

Mark: It’s terrible and, in fact, I think it’s like spray painted a bit. Mark : C'est terrible et, en fait, je pense que c'est un peu peint à la bombe.

Jill: It’s got the gold spray paint? Jill : Il y a de la peinture dorée en aérosol ?

Mark: No, it’s like a blue or maybe that’s just a discoloration of the copper, but I don’t even think it is. Mark: Nein, es ist wie ein Blau oder vielleicht ist das nur eine Verfärbung des Kupfers, aber ich denke nicht einmal, dass es so ist. Actually, I think it was spray painted to look like discoloration of the copper. It’s just horrible.

Jill: And who knows, she might have even spent quite a lot on it.

Mark: I’m sure it cost something, yeah.

Jill: It wouldn’t have been twenty bucks, probably. Jill : Ça n'aurait probablement pas coûté vingt dollars.

Mark: No, probably not, you know.

Jill: You know what, if ever in doubt, just give a woman chocolates. I mean you can’t go wrong with that.

Mark: I think pretty much most people, give them chocolates.

Jill: Yeah, even men.

Mark: Very rarely, oh darn, a box of chocolates. Mark : Très rarement, oh putain, une boîte de chocolats. Mark: Heel zelden, verdorie, een doos chocolaatjes. You don’t hear that very often.

Jill: No, no, so.

Mark: When a box of chocolates shows up in the office it doesn’t linger very long.

Jill: No kidding, even if there’s only two women here, the box will be gone pretty quick.

Mark: I don’t think it’s just the women eating the chocolate.

Jill: No, that’s what I’m saying, even if there are only two women, the box is still gone pretty quick when the rest are men. Jill : Non, c'est ce que je dis, même s'il n'y a que deux femmes, la boîte part quand même assez vite quand les autres sont des hommes.

Mark: For sure, for sure. One thing I was going to ask you, you mentioned that your place is kind of small and you don’t have a room for the baby, what are you going to do? Une chose que j'allais te demander, tu as mentionné que ta maison est un peu petite et que tu n'as pas de chambre pour le bébé, qu'est-ce que tu vas faire ?

Jill: Well, as Chris points out frequently…

Mark: Here we go. Marc : C'est parti.

Jill: Being the practical, engineer-type that he is, our place is still much bigger than what most people have in the world and that most people live in places as big or much smaller than ours with whole families and they do just fine. Jill : Étant le type pratique et ingénieur qu'il est, notre endroit est encore beaucoup plus grand que ce que la plupart des gens ont dans le monde et que la plupart des gens vivent dans des endroits aussi grands ou beaucoup plus petits que le nôtre avec des familles entières et ils s'en sortent très bien. This is certainly the case, I think. C'est certainement le cas, je pense. We have people making faces at us right now in the office, sorry. Nous avons des gens qui nous font des grimaces en ce moment au bureau, désolé.

Mark: Very childish.

Jill: Very childish people we work with here. But, anyway, so I mean it’s not bad, our place is pretty close to 1,000 square feet. Mais, de toute façon, donc je veux dire que ce n'est pas mal, notre maison fait à peu près 1 000 pieds carrés. No, maybe I’m wrong, about 900 square feet and a big huge rooftop deck, so it’s not a small, small, apartment. Non, peut-être que je me trompe, environ 900 pieds carrés et une grande terrasse sur le toit, donc ce n'est pas un petit, petit appartement.

Mark: Right.

Jill: You know, the living room is really big, so yeah, with one kid we could certainly stay there.

Mark: Right.

Jill: Like I said, there’s a small office that we’ve cleaned out and we can fit a crib in there and we can fit a little dresser or whatever and so that’s fine. Jill : Comme je l'ai dit, il y a un petit bureau que nous avons nettoyé et nous pouvons y installer un berceau et nous pouvons y installer une petite commode ou autre et donc ça va.

Mark: You can fit a crib?

Jill: We can, yeah, we can fit a crib and, you know, maybe a little dresser and that’s about it.

Mark: Right.

Jill: So, you know, that’s fine for now, but we definitely are going to move into something bigger. Jill : Donc, vous savez, ça va pour le moment, mais nous allons certainement passer à quelque chose de plus grand.

Mark: Right.

I mean, obviously, when the baby is small it’s not like it’s crawling around. Je veux dire, évidemment, quand le bébé est petit, ce n'est pas comme s'il rampait.

Jill: It doesn’t need any room anyway.

Mark: No and, I guess, the argument that most people in the world…I don’t know if that’s true, but maybe it is. Having not done the research, but… Je n'ai pas fait de recherche, mais…

Jill: Most people don’t live in 2-3-4,000 thousand square foot houses like we live in. Jill : La plupart des gens ne vivent pas dans des maisons de 2 000 à 4 000 pieds carrés comme nous.

Mark: No, for sure.

Jill: I think that’s his point is that you don’t need to expect that much, because you’re not getting it. Jill : Je pense que c'est ce qu'il veut dire, c'est que vous n'avez pas besoin d'en attendre autant, parce que vous ne l'obtenez pas.

Mark: However, most people here do. Mark : Cependant, la plupart des gens ici le font.

Jill: Yeah, that’s kind of what we’re used to. Jill : Ouais, c'est un peu ce à quoi nous sommes habitués.

Mark: We don’t live in the world, we live here. Mark : Nous ne vivons pas dans le monde, nous vivons ici.

Jill: Right.

Mark: You know? Marc : Tu sais ?

Jill: Yeah, yeah.

Mark: I’m giving you some ammunition. Mark : Je te donne des munitions.

Jill: Yes, thank you. I’ve already told him as much, but no, you know what, honestly, I don’t want a big house because I’m not interested in cleaning. I don’t want to be cleaning a whole bunch of bathrooms. I absolutely hate it and I don’t want to be heating a bunch of rooms we don’t use, it’s wasteful and I don’t want a 3,000 square foot house, I absolutely don’t.

Mark: Yeah, in actual fact, it’s not that much more wasteful if the house is properly insulated. Mark : Ouais, en fait, ce n'est pas beaucoup plus inutile si la maison est bien isolée.

Jill: Yeah, I guess that’s true, but I don’t feel that I need that much room. I never had a house that was that big and I never felt like I needed more.

Mark: No.

Jill: So, I don’t have any big desire to have a huge house. I just want a nice little house that is big enough that gives us enough room.

Mark: Yeah, I often feel and, as you say, it’s not the size of the house, but when I was growing up we lived in a house with a yard on a street where you could run around and play. Mark : Oui, je me sens souvent et, comme tu le dis, ce n'est pas la taille de la maison, mais quand j'étais petit, nous vivions dans une maison avec une cour dans une rue où l'on pouvait courir et jouer. I know in much of the world most people live in apartments and you’re in an apartment condo-type of a situation there and so yeah, that’s fine too. I’ve lived in apartments as a kid and it’s fine. You go and do your thing on the street and whatever, but it’s nicer to have a yard and to be in a neighborhood. Vous allez faire votre truc dans la rue et peu importe, mais c'est plus agréable d'avoir un jardin et d'être dans un quartier.

Jill: And nice for parents to let their kids just go out in the yard and you don’t have to worry about them.

Mark: Exactly.

Jill: In our place, fortunately, we live so close to so many parks and the beach and so it’s not like we’re a long way off, a long ways away from good places for them to play at, but then you still have to take them there.

Mark: Right.

Jill: It’s not like you can just let them go out in the yard.

Mark: It’s busier; it’s in the city, yeah. Mark : C'est plus occupé ; c'est en ville, ouais.

Jill: Yeah, exactly.

So, you know, if we could buy a house in the area that we live in we would actually stay in that area. Donc, vous savez, si nous pouvions acheter une maison dans la région où nous vivons, nous resterions en fait dans cette région.

Mark: Right.

Jill: But, I mean the cheapest house over there is a million dollars and that’s for this tiny lot that has a house that you have to teardown and build on. Jill : Mais, je veux dire, la maison la moins chère là-bas coûte un million de dollars et c'est pour ce petit terrain qui a une maison qu'il faut démolir et construire.

Mark: Right.

Jill: And the lots over there are much, much, smaller than the lots over here. Jill : Et les terrains là-bas sont beaucoup, beaucoup plus petits que les terrains ici.

Mark: Right.

Well, that’s the thing, in any city the closer you are to the center of the city then it’s more expensive and you get less room.

Jill: Yeah, exactly.

Mark: That’s just how it is, so if you’re away from the center a little bit then you get more room.

Jill: Yeah, so yeah, I think, you know, we’re definitely going to be looking in the New Year, but we’re not in a huge rush and, at this point, I’m six months pregnant now. Jill : Ouais, alors oui, je pense, vous savez, nous allons certainement chercher au Nouvel An, mais nous ne sommes pas très pressés et, à ce stade, je suis enceinte de six mois maintenant.

Mark: For sure.

Jill: I don’t know, to start moving now and to have a home that we’re going to want to do maybe some renovations to or whatever, I just don’t really want to get into that right now. Jill : Je ne sais pas, pour commencer à déménager maintenant et avoir une maison sur laquelle nous voudrons peut-être faire des rénovations ou quoi que ce soit, je ne veux pas vraiment entrer là-dedans pour le moment.

Mark: And, as you say, your child is not going to be requiring that room any time soon, nor are you likely to have it go outside and play on its own any time soon. Mark : Et, comme vous le dites, votre enfant n'aura pas besoin de cette pièce de sitôt, et vous ne risquez pas non plus de le faire sortir et jouer seul de si tôt.

Jill: No.

I’ve got the deck for that. J'ai le deck pour ça. If it won’t shut up I just lock it upstairs on the deck. S'il ne se ferme pas, je l'enferme juste en haut sur le pont.

Mark: Exactly.

Well, that’s good, that’s something to look forward to.

Jill: Yeah.

Mark: That’s good. With that, I think we’ll probably wrap her up. Sur ce, je pense que nous allons probablement conclure.

Jill: Alright and I guess we will…

Mark: Over the Christmas period we’ll try and keep putting out the podcasts. We may do some sort of in advance and play them sort of later, so they may not be actual up-to-the-minute like always. Nous pouvons faire une sorte d'avance et les jouer un peu plus tard, donc ils peuvent ne pas être à la minute près comme toujours.

Jill: They’ll be there nonetheless.

Mark: They’ll be there nonetheless and, with that, we’ll sign off. Mark: Ze zullen er toch zijn en daarmee tekenen we af.

Jill: Bye, bye.