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English LingQ Podcast 1.0, Eighty-seven: New York, New York

Eighty-seven: New York, New York

Mark: Hello everyone, it's Mark Kaufmann here with the EnglishLingQ Podcast. I'm joined by Jill today. We're actually both back from vacation. Jill: But you're tanned and I'm not. Mark: Yes, well, I went to a hot place. Before we get going, I do want to mention to all you new listeners or existing listeners that this podcast is only the first part of our LingQ Learning System. To really learn from this content it's very important that you go to our website at LingQ.com, find this conversation in our store where you can then read the transcript and look up all the vocabulary that you don't understand, receive instant translations and use our vocabulary tools to learn that vocabulary. It's this combined tool process that will enable you to truly learn from our conversation here today. With that, Jill, how was New York? Jill: New York was fantastic. It was beautiful and sunny every day; not a cloud in the sky. The first day we were there it was about 18 degrees actually, which is around 70 degrees Fahrenheit, 68-70 degrees. Mark: Warm. Jill: Very warm; we didn't even need a jacket and we went to the Macy's Day Parade, which is televised and it's the hugest parade in the U.S. Mark: Is that a Christmas parade? Jill: It's Thanksgiving. Mark: Oh, okay. Jill: It's a Thanksgiving parade actually; but, you know what, we didn't even stay until the very end. I think Santa…I think it's sort of Christmassy as well, but it's their Thanksgiving Day Parade, so there are stars. You know, Dolly Parton was on one of the floats and some musicians were on some of the floats and the Crocodile Hunter's wife and his daughter were on one of the floats. Mark: Right. Jill: So, I mean, we kind of thought we had to see it just because everybody talks about it, but it's still a parade and for me to… We got up at six in the morning. Mark: To watch the parade? Jill: Well, to get ready to go. It starts at nine and people start lining the streets at six-thirty to be at the front to see it. We got there at about quarter to eight and we were pretty close actually. Mark: Right. Jill: But waiting all that time for it to start, by an hour in we were ready to go, so we left. Mark: For sure, I can sympathize with you there. Jill: It's such a huge deal down in the states though, I can't believe what… Mark: Thanksgiving? Jill: Well, the parade as well. Mark: Oh yeah. Jill: And the fact that it's televised and people will actually sit at home and watch it on their TV; this parade. Mark: Personally, parades, I mean, I think they're for kids. Jill: Yeah. Mark: At least I don't enjoy…I mean, okay, there's a parade but, as you say, after 15 minutes I'm kind of ready to go. Jill: Yeah, yeah, that's how I felt. A lot of the floats were spectacular, very well done, you know, definitely not the average parade, but a parade nonetheless. So yeah, it was great to see it once, but I would not go again. Mark: Right. Jill: But, you know, Central Park was just beautiful. The leaves were all changing colors, so it was absolutely spectacular and I could have spent a whole day in there just wandering around; it was so beautiful. And we did just tons of shopping; 12 hours one day. I mean, we were gone between 12 and 15 hours every day that we just didn't stop. And my sister - it was mostly my little sister who was determined to spend every cent that she had saved for this trip - she just wanted to go crazy and if we weren't shopping she had a long face. And so my mom and I…I literally only bought a few things. I bought a couple pairs of jeans, a bag and a pair of boots and that was it. Mark: I was going to say, you're a pretty mean shopper yourself. Jill: I am, I am, but I was too overwhelmed there. There are so many stores, so many great stores, but especially that weekend being the busiest shopping weekend, being right in New York City, it was so overwhelming for me that I don't really enjoy that kind of shopping; it's not peaceful at all. Mark: Right. Jill: So it was an experience, something that I've never had here, but I wasn't prepared to actually put in all the effort to trying things on, waiting in long lineups, whereas my sister was. So I would often just sit down and let her go crazy. She and my mom bought lots and I'd bring them stuff to try and I'd sit. It was really something to see; it was amazing. Mark: Were the stores open on Thanksgiving Day? Jill: No, most of them are closed. The big stores were closed; the department stores. Some of the little stores were open, but most of them were closed. And then Friday, the day after Thanksgiving the Black Friday, is when people line up. Some of the stores open at four a.m. Mark: I saw ads on TV for that. Jill: Yeah and they have these big sales on until noon or one usually, where maybe the whole store is 40 percent off and things like that. Mark: It always amazes me when I'm in the states at Thanksgiving what a big deal it is. Jill: Huge. Mark: In Canada our Thanksgiving is a month earlier and it's really not a big deal at all, it's just a turkey dinner. Jill: Yeah, you get a day off work the second Monday of every October, it's a statutory holiday, you spend it with your family, usually having a nice dinner, but it really has nothing to do with shopping, nothing to do with parades. Mark: There's no real event; it's a Sunday and it's a nice turkey dinner and yeah. The kids at school draw pictures of turkeys and harvest and I don't know… Jill: Yeah, exactly. Mark: In the states, apparently, it's the busiest travel weekend of the year; people all fly home. If they're not living at home they fly home. It's a Thursday, Friday is a holiday. Jill: Everybody says happy holidays to you. Mark: Yeah. Jill: All the stores, everybody would say oh, happy holidays or if you were asking a question or they were telling you something at the end they'd always say happy holidays which, to me, is what we do for Christmas. We make a big deal out of Christmas and I think our Christmas is like their Thanksgiving. Mark: Totally. That's what it is, which is just funny. Like I wonder, it's just funny how it's evolved that way because, presumably, at some point things in Canada and the U.S. were pretty similar. People celebrated Thanksgiving and Christmas in a similar way and over the years it's evolved in such a way that in the states Thanksgiving is their biggest holiday and for us Christmas is. They're similar and both countries have the same holidays, but they are celebrated differently. I just find it interesting. Jill: Yeah it is; it's very interesting. But yeah, New York was amazing; four sunny days, a couple of days were really, really, cold, but beautiful and sunny. You know, we saw the Statue of Liberty and one of the museums and the view from the top of the Empire State Building, which is just amazing. It's just amazing how many buildings are on the Island of Manhattan; how huge, how tall they all are, how many. I've never seen anything like it. I've been to Paris, I've been to London and there's just nothing like New York City; it's really awe-inspiring. Mark: Yeah, yeah, I haven't been there in quite a while, but I went to university out that way and we'd go in to New York every once in a while. I must say, I never really spent much time there. Like you probably spent more time there then I did and I was out there for four years. But that's the one thing that I got out of it, for sure, was that when you drive right through Manhattan it's like you're driving through a tunnel and the buildings are so high on either side of you. Jill: And there are so many. Mark: So many. Jill: It doesn't end and the throngs of people everywhere; it's just amazing. Mark: Yeah, I mean, Tokyo is that way, for sure. I can still remember being there in a…if you're in Tokyo and up on the top floor of a building looking out, I mean as far as the eye can see, all you see is buildings in every direction. Jill: Wow. It's similar, I guess. Mark: It's similar and it's certainly not like that here in Vancouver. Jill: No and I was a bit overwhelmed and over stimulated in the beginning. I actually miss it. Now that I'm home, I look back and I have nothing but fond memories and I miss New York. But while I was there my mom and my sister were always saying “we just love the city, we want to move here,” but never once did I actually think that I wanted to live there. I thought I'm happy I'm going home to Vancouver. It's still a city, there's everything here, it's beautiful, but it's peaceful still, to a certain extent, and you can actually drive and get around. New York, I mean you couldn't pay me to drive in that city. It was just horns going constantly, people over the lines, people not obeying traffic signs. I mean they just do whatever they want and the pedestrians are just as bad. They walk whenever they want, nobody waits for lights and it was just unbelievable. Mark: That's for sure. Jill: Yeah, that kind of chaos would just stress me out if I had to live in it, but it was really something exciting to see. Mark: Well, that's great. It sounds like you had a great time; you're gushing about it. Jill: Well, my mom and my sister are planning the trip for next year already. Mark: Is that right? Jill: They want to make it an annual event. Mark: Really? Jill: Oh, they just loved it so much. Mark: You know I never really felt that excited about being in New York at all. Jill: Yeah. Mark: I'd be there and I couldn't wait to get out. Jill: Well, when you go to see shows and stuff. Mark: I never went on like a holiday; I'd go in for something. I had to go there to somewhere to get something and then I'd leave again. Jill: Right. Mark: I never went to sightsee in New York. Jill: There's a lot to see in that city. There are a lot of great museums, a lot of great shows, comedy acts, talk shows… Mark: Just a lot happening. Jill: So much happening that you could spend a couple weeks there, for sure. But anyway, you… It's funny because we came back…I actually got home at about three in the morning last night. Another plane came in just as we came in and everybody off that plane was wearing shorts and sandals and they were all tanned and I thought, well. We all came in in our big winter coats because it was cold, so they were coming from Mexico and you just came from California. Mark: From California, yeah, we went to visit my wife's mother who was renting a condo there, so we thought why not take advantage and so we all went down. She was in Palm Springs or Palm Desert, which is a desert except for where they water and so it was warm; it was warm. When we first got there it was 30 degrees, highs of 30, but it's dry. It's a desert, so it's quite pleasant and then it got a little cooler by the end of the week it was down to 25. Jill: Oh, very nice. Mark: Which I think is perfect and I think that's about where it stays most of the winter. So yeah, that's why a lot of people from Canada, for sure, from Vancouver, from our area, a lot of retired people will go and spend the winter or parts of the winter in Palm Springs. That's a very common thing to do to get away from the cold and the wet and the snow or whatever and go down to the sunnier climes. Jill: And play golf all winter long. Mark: Yeah, I mean it was great. We were in this little compound where she rented a condo. You know, they've got citrus fruit trees all throughout in amongst all the buildings and you can go and pick grapefruit for your breakfast. Jill: You're kidding. Mark: Oranges and lemons and… Jill: You just pick it right off the trees. Mark: You pick it right off the tree and eat the grapefruit, squeeze some orange juice; like that part of it was awesome. Jill: Awesome, yeah. Mark: And then, otherwise, I mean there's a pool in that complex, right, so my kids were in heaven. You know, it's warm and they're in the pool all day and pretty much that's all they really wanted to do because, obviously, we don't have that here. Jill: They have to go to an indoor pool all winter long. Mark: You have to go to an indoor pool all winter and yeah, to be there where it's hot and sunny and swimming around all day near our place, I mean that was a real treat for them. And then one day we drove into Disneyland in Los Angeles or in Anaheim, actually. We went to Disneyland, so that was obviously a highlight too. Jill: Highlight? Mark: Yeah, for sure, because our kids actually have been to Disneyland in Tokyo a few times, but they were quite small and so to go back, especially the younger ones, they really didn't remember anything, so it was a real treat for them. It was good other than the traffic jam we hit on the way out of town. Boy, that Los Angeles is unbelievable, the highways and the driving and the cars. Jill: I think the traffic in those huge American cities is something else. Mark: It's a whole other level from here. We think it's crowded here, but it's not. Jill: No. Mark: Which starts to get me thinking when they always say oh, in 50 years Vancouver's population will double or whatever the statistics they throw out, I always ask myself why? Why is it going to double? Why is that a good thing? I don't think it has to because it's just going to be more and more crowded. Jill: I don't want it to. Mark: I don't want it to either. Jill: Our infrastructure is not set up for that. Mark: No. And so then the alternative is all of a sudden now you've got these big super highways and yeah, all the buildings and I mean, to me, I prefer smaller. Jill: Quaint. Mark: Even when I was in Japan we'd go to Tokyo and, I must say…I lived in a small town in Japan in the mountains and, I don't know, there were 20,000 people and so then we'd be in Tokyo…I must say, I couldn't wait to get out. Not that I didn't…I liked being there, it was neat. I mean it's amazing. All the people, all the buildings, all the hustle and bustle, but I tell ya', I was ready to go. When it was time to go it was just a sense of relief to go back out in the countryside, as you say, drive where you want to drive and no traffic. Jill: I felt that way about New York. I loved it, I loved visiting, but when my mom and sister said that they could live there I said there is no way you could pay me to live there. There's nothing relaxing about it, it's just so much stimulation all the time and it was overwhelming for me. It almost created a bit of anxiety sometimes; I just wanted to get away from it. Mark: Right. Jill: I mean now I kind of miss the whole excitement of it, but…even in Vancouver, you know, I live right in a busy part of Vancouver where there's a lot going on, which would seem busy to you because you live in a very nice, quiet, suburb, which is mostly families. But where I live in the busy part of Vancouver was not even half as busy as New York and it can't even compare. Mark: No, oh no, no, there's just a whole other level. Jill: So… Mark: Yeah, well yeah, I mean I certainly know what you're talking about from being in New York or just on the East Coast. In a way, that whole East Coast is one big city. I mean, okay, New York, where you were, is the epicenter, but I know I prefer things a little more quiet. Jill: So Palm Desert was a little more mellow. Mark: Palm Desert was a little too quiet. Jill: Yeah. Mark: Yeah. Jill: Yeah, I've heard that because it's mostly retirees. Mark: Yeah, it's mostly retirees, yeah. So, but, the weather is great and the kids had a ball and it was fun, you know. Jill: Good. Mark: And with that, we should probably go because we try to keep these to a reasonable length, so that people who are, whatever…if you're doing the dishes you're probably done by now, so you're ready for us to leave. So with that, we'll talk to you again next time. Jill: Alright, bye, bye.


Eighty-seven: New York, New York

Mark: Hello everyone, it’s Mark Kaufmann here with the EnglishLingQ Podcast. Mark: Hallo allerseits, hier ist Mark Kaufmann mit dem EnglishLingQ Podcast. I’m joined by Jill today. Ich werde heute von Jill begleitet. We’re actually both back from vacation. Wir sind beide aus dem Urlaub zurück. Jill: But you’re tanned and I’m not. Jill: Aber du bist gebräunt und ich nicht. Mark: Yes, well, I went to a hot place. Mark: Ja, ich bin an einen heißen Ort gegangen. Before we get going, I do want to mention to all you new listeners or existing listeners that this podcast is only the first part of our LingQ Learning System. Bevor wir loslegen, möchte ich allen neuen oder bestehenden Hörern sagen, dass dieser Podcast nur der erste Teil unseres LingQ-Lernsystems ist. To really learn from this content it’s very important that you go to our website at LingQ.com, find this conversation in our store where you can then read the transcript and look up all the vocabulary that you don’t understand, receive instant translations and use our vocabulary tools to learn that vocabulary. Um wirklich aus diesen Inhalten zu lernen, ist es sehr wichtig, dass Sie unsere Website unter LingQ.com besuchen, diese Konversation in unserem Shop finden, wo Sie das Transkript lesen und alle Vokabeln nachschlagen können, die Sie nicht verstehen, sofortige Übersetzungen erhalten und Verwenden Sie unsere Vokabeltools, um dieses Vokabular zu lernen. It’s this combined tool process that will enable you to truly learn from our conversation here today. Es ist dieser kombinierte Werkzeugprozess, mit dem Sie wirklich aus unserem heutigen Gespräch hier lernen können. With that, Jill, how was New York? Wie war New York damit, Jill? Jill: New York was fantastic. It was beautiful and sunny every day; not a cloud in the sky. Es war jeden Tag schön und sonnig; keine Wolke am Himmel. The first day we were there it was about 18 degrees actually, which is around 70 degrees Fahrenheit, 68-70 degrees. Am ersten Tag, als wir dort waren, waren es ungefähr 18 Grad, was ungefähr 70 Grad Fahrenheit, 68-70 Grad entspricht. Mark: Warm. Jill: Very warm; we didn’t even need a jacket and we went to the Macy’s Day Parade, which is televised and it’s the hugest parade in the U.S. Jill: Sehr warm; Wir brauchten nicht einmal eine Jacke und gingen zur Macy's Day Parade, die im Fernsehen übertragen wird und die größte Parade in den USA ist Mark: Is that a Christmas parade? Jill: It’s Thanksgiving. Mark: Oh, okay. Jill: It’s a Thanksgiving parade actually; but, you know what, we didn’t even stay until the very end. Jill : C'est un défilé de Thanksgiving en fait ; mais, vous savez quoi, nous ne sommes même pas restés jusqu'à la toute fin. I think Santa…I think it’s sort of Christmassy as well, but it’s their Thanksgiving Day Parade, so there are stars. Je pense que le Père Noël… Je pense que c'est un peu Noël aussi, mais c'est leur défilé de Thanksgiving, donc il y a des stars. You know, Dolly Parton was on one of the floats and some musicians were on some of the floats and the Crocodile Hunter’s wife and his daughter were on one of the floats. Weißt du, Dolly Parton war auf einem der Wagen und einige Musiker waren auf einigen der Wagen und die Frau des Krokodiljägers und seine Tochter waren auf einem der Wagen. Vous savez, Dolly Parton était sur l'un des chars et des musiciens étaient sur certains des chars et la femme du Crocodile Hunter et sa fille étaient sur l'un des chars. Mark: Right. Jill: So, I mean, we kind of thought we had to see it just because everybody talks about it, but it’s still a parade and for me to… We got up at six in the morning. Jill : Donc, je veux dire, nous pensions en quelque sorte que nous devions le voir juste parce que tout le monde en parle, mais c'est toujours un défilé et pour moi de… Nous nous sommes levés à six heures du matin. Mark: To watch the parade? Jill: Well, to get ready to go. It starts at nine and people start lining the streets at six-thirty to be at the front to see it. We got there at about quarter to eight and we were pretty close actually. Nous sommes arrivés vers huit heures moins le quart et nous étions assez proches en fait. Mark: Right. Jill: But waiting all that time for it to start, by an hour in we were ready to go, so we left. Jill : Mais en attendant tout ce temps pour que ça commence, une heure plus tard, nous étions prêts à partir, alors nous sommes partis. Mark: For sure, I can sympathize with you there. Марк: Конечно, я могу вам посочувствовать. Jill: It’s such a huge deal down in the states though, I can’t believe what… Jill : C'est tellement énorme aux États-Unis, je n'arrive pas à croire quoi... Mark: Thanksgiving? Jill: Well, the parade as well. Mark: Oh yeah. Jill: And the fact that it’s televised and people will actually sit at home and watch it on their TV; this parade. Mark: Personally, parades, I mean, I think they’re for kids. Jill: Yeah. Mark: At least I don’t enjoy…I mean, okay, there’s a parade but, as you say, after 15 minutes I’m kind of ready to go. Jill: Yeah, yeah, that’s how I felt. A lot of the floats were spectacular, very well done, you know, definitely not the average parade, but a parade nonetheless. So yeah, it was great to see it once, but I would not go again. Mark: Right. Jill: But, you know, Central Park was just beautiful. The leaves were all changing colors, so it was absolutely spectacular and I could have spent a whole day in there just wandering around; it was so beautiful. And we did just tons of shopping; 12 hours one day. Et nous avons fait des tonnes de shopping; 12 heures un jour. I mean, we were gone between 12 and 15 hours every day that we just didn’t stop. Je veux dire, nous étions partis entre 12 et 15 heures chaque jour sans nous arrêter. And my sister - it was mostly my little sister who was determined to spend every cent that she had saved for this trip - she just wanted to go crazy and if we weren’t shopping she had a long face. Et ma sœur - c'était surtout ma petite sœur qui était déterminée à dépenser chaque centime qu'elle avait économisé pour ce voyage - elle voulait juste devenir folle et si nous ne faisions pas de shopping, elle avait un long visage. And so my mom and I…I literally only bought a few things. I bought a couple pairs of jeans, a bag and a pair of boots and that was it. J'ai acheté quelques paires de jeans, un sac et une paire de bottes et c'était tout. Mark: I was going to say, you’re a pretty mean shopper yourself. Mark : J'allais dire que vous êtes vous-même un client assez méchant. Jill: I am, I am, but I was too overwhelmed there. Jill: Je le suis, je le suis, mais j'étais trop submergée là-bas. Джилл: Да, но я была слишком потрясена. There are so many stores, so many great stores, but especially that weekend being the busiest shopping weekend, being right in New York City, it was so overwhelming for me that I don’t really enjoy that kind of shopping; it’s not peaceful at all. Mark: Right. Jill: So it was an experience, something that I’ve never had here, but I wasn’t prepared to actually put in all the effort to trying things on, waiting in long lineups, whereas my sister was. Jill : C'était donc une expérience, quelque chose que je n'avais jamais vécu ici, mais je n'étais pas prête à faire tous les efforts pour essayer des choses, à attendre dans de longues files d'attente, alors que ma sœur l'était. So I would often just sit down and let her go crazy. She and my mom bought lots and I’d bring them stuff to try and I’d sit. Elle et ma mère en achetaient beaucoup et je leur apportais des trucs à essayer et je m'asseyais. It was really something to see; it was amazing. Mark: Were the stores open on Thanksgiving Day? Jill: No, most of them are closed. The big stores were closed; the department stores. Большие магазины были закрыты; универмаги. Some of the little stores were open, but most of them were closed. And then Friday, the day after Thanksgiving the Black Friday, is when people line up. Some of the stores open at four a.m. Mark: I saw ads on TV for that. Марк: Я видел по телевизору рекламу этого. Jill: Yeah and they have these big sales on until noon or one usually, where maybe the whole store is 40 percent off and things like that. Mark: It always amazes me when I’m in the states at Thanksgiving what a big deal it is. Mark : Cela m'étonne toujours quand je suis aux États-Unis à Thanksgiving, à quel point c'est important. Jill: Huge. Mark: In Canada our Thanksgiving is a month earlier and it’s really not a big deal at all, it’s just a turkey dinner. Jill: Yeah, you get a day off work the second Monday of every October, it’s a statutory holiday, you spend it with your family, usually having a nice dinner, but it really has nothing to do with shopping, nothing to do with parades. Jill: Evet, her Ekim ayının ikinci Pazartesi günü işten bir gün izin alıyorsunuz, bu yasal bir tatil, ailenizle geçiriyorsunuz, genellikle güzel bir akşam yemeği yiyorsunuz, ama alışveriş ile ilgisi yok, geçit törenleriyle ilgisi yok . Mark: There’s no real event; it’s a Sunday and it’s a nice turkey dinner and yeah. Mark: Gerçek bir olay yok; Bu bir Pazar ve güzel bir hindi yemeği ve evet. The kids at school draw pictures of turkeys and harvest and I don’t know… Okuldaki çocuklar hindi ve hasat resimleri çiziyor ve bilmiyorum… Jill: Yeah, exactly. Mark: In the states, apparently, it’s the busiest travel weekend of the year; people all fly home. Mark: Eyaletlerde, görünüşe göre, yılın en yoğun seyahat hafta sonu; insanlar eve uçarlar. If they’re not living at home they fly home. Evde yaşamıyorlarsa eve uçarlar. It’s a Thursday, Friday is a holiday. Jill: Everybody says happy holidays to you. Mark: Yeah. Jill: All the stores, everybody would say oh, happy holidays or if you were asking a question or they were telling you something at the end they’d always say happy holidays which, to me, is what we do for Christmas. Jill: Tüm mağazalar, herkes mutlu tatiller diyebilir ya da bir soru sorarsanız ya da sonunda size bir şey söylüyorlarsa, Noel için yaptığımız şey her zaman mutlu tatiller derlerdi. We make a big deal out of Christmas and I think our Christmas is like their Thanksgiving. Мы придаем большое значение Рождеству, и я думаю, что наше Рождество похоже на их День Благодарения. Mark: Totally. That’s what it is, which is just funny. Like I wonder, it’s just funny how it’s evolved that way because, presumably, at some point things in Canada and the U.S. Comme je me demande, c'est juste drôle comment cela a évolué de cette façon parce que, vraisemblablement, à un moment donné, les choses au Canada et aux États-Unis Merak ettiğim gibi, bu şekilde nasıl geliştiği çok komik çünkü muhtemelen Kanada ve ABD'deki bazı noktalarda were pretty similar. People celebrated Thanksgiving and Christmas in a similar way and over the years it’s evolved in such a way that in the states Thanksgiving is their biggest holiday and for us Christmas is. Les gens ont célébré Thanksgiving et Noël de la même manière et au fil des ans, cela a évolué de telle manière que dans les États-Unis, Thanksgiving est leur plus grande fête et pour nous, Noël l'est. They’re similar and both countries have the same holidays, but they are celebrated differently. I just find it interesting. Jill: Yeah it is; it’s very interesting. But yeah, New York was amazing; four sunny days, a couple of days were really, really, cold, but beautiful and sunny. Mais oui, New York était incroyable ; quatre jours ensoleillés, quelques jours étaient vraiment, vraiment, froids, mais beaux et ensoleillés. You know, we saw the Statue of Liberty and one of the museums and the view from the top of the Empire State Building, which is just amazing. Özgürlük Anıtı'nı ve müzelerden birini ve Empire State Binası'nın tepesinden manzarayı gördük, ki bu inanılmaz. It’s just amazing how many buildings are on the Island of Manhattan; how huge, how tall they all are, how many. Manhattan Adası'nda kaç bina olması şaşırtıcı; ne kadar büyük, ne kadar uzun boylu, kaç tane. I’ve never seen anything like it. I’ve been to Paris, I’ve been to London and there’s just nothing like New York City; it’s really awe-inspiring. Я был в Париже, я был в Лондоне, и нет ничего лучше Нью-Йорка; это действительно внушает благоговение. Paris'e gittim, Londra'ya gittim ve New York gibi bir şey yok; gerçekten hayranlık uyandırıcı. Mark: Yeah, yeah, I haven’t been there in quite a while, but I went to university out that way and we’d go in to New York every once in a while. Mark : Ouais, ouais, je n'y suis pas allé depuis un bon moment, mais je suis allé à l'université de cette façon et nous allions à New York de temps en temps. Mark: Evet, evet, uzun süredir orada değildim, ama üniversiteye bu şekilde gittim ve arada bir New York'a giderdik. I must say, I never really spent much time there. Söylemeliyim ki, orada gerçekten fazla zaman geçirmedim. Like you probably spent more time there then I did and I was out there for four years. Comme vous avez probablement passé plus de temps là-bas que moi et j'y suis resté quatre ans. But that’s the one thing that I got out of it, for sure, was that when you drive right through Manhattan it’s like you’re driving through a tunnel and the buildings are so high on either side of you. Ama ondan çıkardığım tek şey, kesinlikle Manhattan'dan geçtiğinizde bir tünelden geçiyormuşsunuz ve binaların her iki tarafında da çok yüksek olmasıydı. Jill: And there are so many. Mark: So many. Jill: It doesn’t end and the throngs of people everywhere; it’s just amazing. Jill: Sonu yok ve her yerde insanların tahtları; bu sadece harika. Mark: Yeah, I mean, Tokyo is that way, for sure. I can still remember being there in a…if you’re in Tokyo and up on the top floor of a building looking out, I mean as far as the eye can see, all you see is buildings in every direction. Tokyo'da ve dışarıda bir binanın en üst katındaysanız hala orada olduğumu hatırlıyorum. Jill: Wow. It’s similar, I guess. Mark: It’s similar and it’s certainly not like that here in Vancouver. Mark : C'est similaire et ce n'est certainement pas comme ça ici à Vancouver. Jill: No and I was a bit overwhelmed and over stimulated in the beginning. I actually miss it. Ça me manque en fait. Now that I’m home, I look back and I have nothing but fond memories and I miss New York. But while I was there my mom and my sister were always saying “we just love the city, we want to move here,” but never once did I actually think that I wanted to live there. Mais pendant que j'étais là-bas, ma mère et ma sœur disaient toujours "nous adorons la ville, nous voulons déménager ici", mais je n'ai jamais pensé que je voulais vivre là-bas. I thought I’m happy I’m going home to Vancouver. It’s still a city, there’s everything here, it’s beautiful, but it’s peaceful still, to a certain extent, and you can actually drive and get around. New York, I mean you couldn’t pay me to drive in that city. Нью-Йорк, я имею в виду, что вы не можете заплатить мне за вождение в этом городе. It was just horns going constantly, people over the lines, people not obeying traffic signs. I mean they just do whatever they want and the pedestrians are just as bad. They walk whenever they want, nobody waits for lights and it was just unbelievable. Mark: That’s for sure. Jill: Yeah, that kind of chaos would just stress me out if I had to live in it, but it was really something exciting to see. Mark: Well, that’s great. It sounds like you had a great time; you’re gushing about it. On dirait que tu t'es bien amusé; vous en raffolez. Jill: Well, my mom and my sister are planning the trip for next year already. Mark: Is that right? Jill: They want to make it an annual event. Mark: Really? Jill: Oh, they just loved it so much. Mark: You know I never really felt that excited about being in New York at all. Jill: Yeah. Mark: I’d be there and I couldn’t wait to get out. Mark : J'y serais et j'avais hâte de sortir. Jill: Well, when you go to see shows and stuff. Jill : Eh bien, quand vous allez voir des spectacles et tout ça. Mark: I never went on like a holiday; I’d go in for something. Mark : Je n'ai jamais continué comme des vacances ; J'irais pour quelque chose. I had to go there to somewhere to get something and then I’d leave again. Jill: Right. Mark: I never went to sightsee in New York. Jill: There’s a lot to see in that city. There are a lot of great museums, a lot of great shows, comedy acts, talk shows… Mark: Just a lot happening. Mark : Il se passe beaucoup de choses. Jill: So much happening that you could spend a couple weeks there, for sure. But anyway, you… It’s funny because we came back…I actually got home at about three in the morning last night. Mais de toute façon, vous… C'est drôle parce que nous sommes revenus… En fait, je suis rentré vers trois heures du matin hier soir. Another plane came in just as we came in and everybody off that plane was wearing shorts and sandals and they were all tanned and I thought, well. Un autre avion est arrivé juste au moment où nous sommes arrivés et tout le monde en dehors de cet avion portait des shorts et des sandales et ils étaient tous bronzés et j'ai pensé, eh bien. We all came in in our big winter coats because it was cold, so they were coming from Mexico and you just came from California. Nous sommes tous venus avec nos gros manteaux d'hiver parce qu'il faisait froid, alors ils venaient du Mexique et vous venez de Californie. Mark: From California, yeah, we went to visit my wife’s mother who was renting a condo there, so we thought why not take advantage and so we all went down. Mark : De Californie, oui, nous sommes allés rendre visite à la mère de ma femme qui louait un condo là-bas, alors nous nous sommes dit pourquoi ne pas en profiter et nous sommes tous descendus. Марк: Да, из Калифорнии мы поехали навестить мать моей жены, которая снимала там квартиру, поэтому мы подумали, почему бы не воспользоваться этим, и все мы пошли вниз. She was in Palm Springs or Palm Desert, which is a desert except for where they water and so it was warm; it was warm. Elle était à Palm Springs ou Palm Desert, qui est un désert sauf là où ils arrosent et donc il faisait chaud; il faisait chaud. When we first got there it was 30 degrees, highs of 30, but it’s dry. It’s a desert, so it’s quite pleasant and then it got a little cooler by the end of the week it was down to 25. C'est un désert, donc c'est assez agréable et puis il faisait un peu plus frais à la fin de la semaine, il était tombé à 25. Jill: Oh, very nice. Mark: Which I think is perfect and I think that’s about where it stays most of the winter. Mark : Ce qui, à mon avis, est parfait et je pense que c'est à peu près là où il reste la majeure partie de l'hiver. So yeah, that’s why a lot of people from Canada, for sure, from Vancouver, from our area, a lot of retired people will go and spend the winter or parts of the winter in Palm Springs. That’s a very common thing to do to get away from the cold and the wet and the snow or whatever and go down to the sunnier climes. C'est une chose très courante à faire pour s'éloigner du froid, de l'humidité, de la neige ou autre et descendre vers des climats plus ensoleillés. Jill: And play golf all winter long. Mark: Yeah, I mean it was great. We were in this little compound where she rented a condo. Nous étions dans ce petit complexe où elle a loué un condo. You know, they’ve got citrus fruit trees all throughout in amongst all the buildings and you can go and pick grapefruit for your breakfast. Vous savez, il y a des agrumes partout dans tous les bâtiments et vous pouvez aller cueillir des pamplemousses pour votre petit-déjeuner. Jill: You’re kidding. Mark: Oranges and lemons and… Jill: You just pick it right off the trees. Mark: You pick it right off the tree and eat the grapefruit, squeeze some orange juice; like that part of it was awesome. Jill: Awesome, yeah. Mark: And then, otherwise, I mean there’s a pool in that complex, right, so my kids were in heaven. You know, it’s warm and they’re in the pool all day and pretty much that’s all they really wanted to do because, obviously, we don’t have that here. Vous savez, il fait chaud et ils sont dans la piscine toute la journée et c'est à peu près tout ce qu'ils voulaient vraiment faire parce que, évidemment, nous n'avons pas ça ici. Jill: They have to go to an indoor pool all winter long. Jill : Ils doivent aller dans une piscine couverte tout l'hiver. Mark: You have to go to an indoor pool all winter and yeah, to be there where it’s hot and sunny and swimming around all day near our place, I mean that was a real treat for them. Mark : Vous devez aller dans une piscine intérieure tout l'hiver et oui, être là où il fait chaud et ensoleillé et nager toute la journée près de chez nous, je veux dire que c'était un vrai régal pour eux. And then one day we drove into Disneyland in Los Angeles or in Anaheim, actually. We went to Disneyland, so that was obviously a highlight too. Jill: Highlight? Mark: Yeah, for sure, because our kids actually have been to Disneyland in Tokyo a few times, but they were quite small and so to go back, especially the younger ones, they really didn’t remember anything, so it was a real treat for them. Марк: Да, конечно, потому что наши дети на самом деле были в Диснейленде в Токио несколько раз, но они были довольно маленькими, и поэтому, чтобы вернуться, особенно младшие, они действительно ничего не помнили, так что это было настоящее лечить для них. It was good other than the traffic jam we hit on the way out of town. Boy, that Los Angeles is unbelievable, the highways and the driving and the cars. Jill: I think the traffic in those huge American cities is something else. Джилл: Я думаю, что движение в этих огромных американских городах - это нечто иное. Mark: It’s a whole other level from here. We think it’s crowded here, but it’s not. Jill: No. Mark: Which starts to get me thinking when they always say oh, in 50 years Vancouver’s population will double or whatever the statistics they throw out, I always ask myself why? Mark : Ce qui commence à me faire réfléchir quand ils disent toujours oh, dans 50 ans, la population de Vancouver doublera ou quelles que soient les statistiques qu'ils lancent, je me demande toujours pourquoi ? Why is it going to double? Why is that a good thing? I don’t think it has to because it’s just going to be more and more crowded. Je ne pense pas que ce soit nécessaire car il y aura de plus en plus de monde. Jill: I don’t want it to. Mark: I don’t want it to either. Jill: Our infrastructure is not set up for that. Mark: No. And so then the alternative is all of a sudden now you’ve got these big super highways and yeah, all the buildings and I mean, to me, I prefer smaller. Jill: Quaint. Джилл: Странно. Mark: Even when I was in Japan we’d go to Tokyo and, I must say…I lived in a small town in Japan in the mountains and, I don’t know, there were 20,000 people and so then we’d be in Tokyo…I must say, I couldn’t wait to get out. Mark : Même lorsque j'étais au Japon, nous allions à Tokyo et, je dois dire... je vivais dans une petite ville au Japon dans les montagnes et, je ne sais pas, il y avait 20 000 personnes, alors nous serions à Tokyo… Je dois dire que j'avais hâte de sortir. Not that I didn’t…I liked being there, it was neat. Не то чтобы я не… Мне там нравилось, это было аккуратно. I mean it’s amazing. All the people, all the buildings, all the hustle and bustle, but I tell ya', I was ready to go. Tous les gens, tous les bâtiments, toute l'agitation, mais je te le dis, j'étais prêt à partir. When it was time to go it was just a sense of relief to go back out in the countryside, as you say, drive where you want to drive and no traffic. Quand il était temps de partir, c'était juste un sentiment de soulagement de retourner dans la campagne, comme vous dites, conduisez où vous voulez et pas de circulation. Jill: I felt that way about New York. I loved it, I loved visiting, but when my mom and sister said that they could live there I said there is no way you could pay me to live there. There’s nothing relaxing about it, it’s just so much stimulation all the time and it was overwhelming for me. It almost created a bit of anxiety sometimes; I just wanted to get away from it. Mark: Right. Jill: I mean now I kind of miss the whole excitement of it, but…even in Vancouver, you know, I live right in a busy part of Vancouver where there’s a lot going on, which would seem busy to you because you live in a very nice, quiet, suburb, which is mostly families. Jill : Je veux dire, maintenant, toute cette excitation me manque un peu, mais… même à Vancouver, vous savez, je vis dans un quartier animé de Vancouver où il se passe beaucoup de choses, ce qui vous semble occupé parce que vous vivez dans une banlieue très agréable et calme, principalement familiale. But where I live in the busy part of Vancouver was not even half as busy as New York and it can’t even compare. Mais l'endroit où je vis dans la partie animée de Vancouver n'était même pas à moitié aussi occupé que New York et cela ne peut même pas être comparé. Mark: No, oh no, no, there’s just a whole other level. Jill: So… Mark: Yeah, well yeah, I mean I certainly know what you’re talking about from being in New York or just on the East Coast. Mark : Ouais, eh bien ouais, je veux dire, je sais certainement de quoi tu parles étant donné que tu es à New York ou juste sur la côte Est. In a way, that whole East Coast is one big city. I mean, okay, New York, where you were, is the epicenter, but I know I prefer things a little more quiet. Jill: So Palm Desert was a little more mellow. Mark: Palm Desert was a little too quiet. Jill: Yeah. Mark: Yeah. Jill: Yeah, I’ve heard that because it’s mostly retirees. Mark: Yeah, it’s mostly retirees, yeah. So, but, the weather is great and the kids had a ball and it was fun, you know. Jill: Good. Mark: And with that, we should probably go because we try to keep these to a reasonable length, so that people who are, whatever…if you’re doing the dishes you’re probably done by now, so you’re ready for us to leave. Mark : Et avec ça, nous devrions probablement y aller parce que nous essayons de les garder à une longueur raisonnable, de sorte que les gens qui sont, peu importe… si vous faites la vaisselle, vous avez probablement fini maintenant, donc vous êtes prêt pour nous de partir. So with that, we’ll talk to you again next time. Donc sur ce, nous vous reparlerons la prochaine fois. Jill: Alright, bye, bye.