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Steve's Language Learning Tips, Want Better Pronunciation in a Foreign Language?

Want Better Pronunciation in a Foreign Language?

Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here and today I'm going to talk about pronunciation. Remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notification. And for those of you who listen on Apple Podcasts, please feel free to leave a review. We greatly appreciate it. So pronunciation, the reason I want to talk about pronunciation is actually two things that happened today. First of all, I had, we had house guests, my wife and I. These are very good friends, we knew them from Japan, uh, he was a consul general in Osaka. Uh, he was a language student of Japanese way back when I knew him in the early seventies, he married a Japanese girl.

And so, you know, we've seen them from time to time over the last 50 years. They live in Kelowna. They came by on their way to Whistler and they overnighted with us and we have, of course, we just talked forever, went for walks and, uh, we were talking about wine and he referred... and he speaks French and he said, uh, Sauvignon Blanc, Sauvignon.

You know, I've heard people say Sauvignon Blanc. He didn't, at least he didn't say Blanc. And I thought to myself, he knows, I mean, we have the sound in English. It's not Sauvignon it's Sauvignon. So we have the word, we have that "o" sound in English. Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc. But because in English were a bit sloppy in how we pronounce things.

Now, I'm sure, but I know he's a stickler. Like I think even in speaking French, he would say Sauvignon, it's Sauvignon. So there's a certain lack of attention to the sounds. You hear this all the time. And I think... I'm going to give examples in other languages where our English habits, if we're English speakers, tend to dominate our efforts to speak the foreign language. Uh, now the other thing that was brought to my attention, and this is a, I think it was the person's name was maybe Mike Murphy commenting here, uh, on my, uh, one of my YouTube videos about noticing that, uh, and he's been teaching in China for a long time, and the, even with all kinds of work with the international phonetic alphabet IPA, which I find quite unhelpful, but people don't notice certain things. And so he noticed though that a lot of Chinese people can't pronounce the word "usually" they say... and absolutely I've heard so many Chinese people say...

So I'm thinking about those two things. So in English, we're a bit lazy with our vowels. So the vowelss, we don't say, we don't clearly say Sauvignon. Uh, and that's how English is, you know, we just kind of slur the vowels a little bit. We don't give the vowels the full value, but there are languages where they do like French or Spanish or Japanese, full vowel. In Russian and in Portuguese, some of the vows kind of fall away, but in, in many languages, they want the full value for the vowel. That's not to say that they don't also slur. So in French, you know, we want to have a clear, you know... but people then end up saying...so that they don't give it full value. And, you know, instead of saying... they say...

So all of these things happen, but we have to start by being able to notice the clear, clean, correct pronunciation, and we have to be able to do it. And only once we have that correct pronunciation, the ability to hear it and to reproduce that clear proper sound for that vowel in that language only then can we afford to get sloppy.

So, and going back to the Chinese example, of course, if you've ever been to Beijing and taken a taxi, you can, I mean, even as someone who speaks Chinese, it's hard to follow them because it's...it's a very... type of, if they're from Beijing. Uh, and so maybe that's what carries over into the English instead of going "usually", you know, if you really thought if that Chinese speaker would, would sort of look at it. And of course the problem in English is that the words aren't written the way they're pronounced. So it's not... there's not a soft... sounded like in French, you know, where you would have a J, which has a... sound usually has that same sound, but it's written S U "usually".

And of course, in most words, S U doesn't have that, uh, you know, S value. We say Supreme, Supreme, suffer, uh, English is tough. It ain't, it's just tough. But I think that Chinese speakers and there's so many of them who say... they have to sit down and look at that word and practice saying that word correctly.

And then eventually they'll be able to incorporate that word into a sentence that they speak, you know, at normal speed. And I remember that, you know, now I've learned lots of languages, but French and, uh, and Chinese were my first and I actually worked hard at the pronunciation. I remember the Chinese sound... like ...

we don't have that in English. So I had to work at it and I would pronounce Chinese and I particularly remember... And to the point where the muscles here in my, in my jaw were kind of sore. Uh, I also remember trying very hard to improve my French pronunciation because even though we say like "pronunciation", You really, if you're an English speaker, you have to work hard to force yourself to say "pronunciation", because the tendency from English, which, which is what our brain is set up for is to say "pronunciation" it's not pronounced "pronunciation" it's "pronunciation", and it's, it takes an extra bit of effort to give it that full value. And once you have the full value, you can then "pronunciation" you can kind of slur over it a bit, but if you don't have that essential, you know, that core ability to make those sounds correctly, then you're going to end up with the equivalent of "usually" that the Chinese use for usually.

And this is true in all languages. I mean, Spanish also has pure vowels and they're not dipthongs, so it's not "bueno" an English speaker will say "bueno", "no bueno" or whatever. It's "bueno". "bueno". We have to focus in on that. And I don't think the, uh, international phonetic alphabet helps. I think you have to listen very carefully and then repeat very deliberately.

And, uh, you know, in a way, if you do the mini stories at LingQ you get sentence by sentence and you can hear the natural uh, you know, voice read those sentences. So you can, you can listen to the sound, text to speech for one word, but you can also hear a sentence and then try to imitate it. And when you try to imitate it, really work the jaw muscles so that you're giving it the full value.

If in the case of, uh, if it's Chinese, then it's... The real... is coming in. If it's French...if it's, uh, you know, "bueno", "bueno" cut that "a", it's not a "bueno" it's a "bueno". And we have to hear those things. We have to develop the ability to hear the difference between how we sound and how the native speaker sounds and focus in on some of these key sounds.

So you build up a base, the ability to make these sounds and it's difficult at first, you might make it once, but then within a sentence, you'll lose it. I'll always remember in Montreal, I used to hitchhike to McGill University because you know, it was a long bus ride and there was another fellow hitchhiking and he was an immigrant from Southern Italy and we got friendly.

In fact, we ended up looking for work on construction sites in Montreal together, and his English was terrible and I was trying to help him. And, uh, so he couldn't say small. He would always say "small". And it was frustrating, I said saying no, no, no, no small. Uh, okay. So I would say go small. And he went "small" for whatever reason he was preprogrammed to say "small".

Maybe he heard it from other people from Southern Italy. I don't know. I don't know. In the end we worked construction for a couple of months. And then I went down to the dock and I was able to hitchhike on a boat going across to Europe so I worked on a boat going across to Europe and I haven't seen him since.

I don't know if he still says "small". Sounds like the... in French and in other languages where they have an...sound, that takes a lot of work. And you know, that traditional sort of suggestion is to go... put your mouth in sort of the shape to go... and then just try and say E so if you go...you'll end up with an... even if you're able to produce the...to get to the point where you can produce it on the fly in a phrase or a sentence, it takes a lot of practice.

Uh, so you got to notice it, you gotta practice it individually and then you want to get into doing it in sentences. So my suggestion on pronunciation is begin by really focusing, and so if you're a Chinese speaker and you say you were really get ahold of that word, look at it, break it down, say u-su-a-lly, usually, usually, usually usually get to where you can say the word and then usually I like to go, you know, and usually when I study languages, I do this, that or the other. So throw it into a sentence. Now, second suggestion is to pronounce well there's two things we have to do: we got to hear it and we got to be able to produce the sound. We don't have to get a hundred percent, but more or less.

The second thing is we don't want to resist that sound. You know, there are, we don't want to resist anything that has to do with that language. So, you know, Swedish...and if you uh feel self-conscious about doing that, then you won't do it.

So you've got to not feel self-conscious. And in that regard, I find that if you can get a hold of, in that regard our mini stories at LingQ are great because they're kind of narrated without feeling. I enjoyed when I was learning Mandarin, I enjoyed the... dialogues because there was a lot of feeling in those, these comedians telling a story.

And, uh, I think the same when we learn languages, sometimes if we can get ahold of something that's spoken with feeling, that we connect at an emotional level, and sometimes we can have fun with it in different languages. You know, we can say... just sort of get into the... you get into sort of almost like a situation where emotion is involved and so you, you play at the language and so that way you're connecting, you're creating some emotional connection. The phrasiology and the pronunciation. So I think all of those things are important.

It begins by getting a grasp on how it's actually pronounced, uh, you know, making the effort to pronounce correctly, which is more effort. It's an effort to say"pronunciation" "Sauvignon Blanc". You gotta work at it until eventually it becomes natural. And then get a hold of something that you can emotionally connect to.

And then imitate when people speak with some emotion. In most situations, you won't be, you know, kind of wrapped up in that. And, uh, but it, again, it helps. And, and I think for people having learned as many languages as I have, and I have to admit that the first few languages I worked hard on pronunciation.

And then I think that introduces a level of flexibility in the brain. So the subsequent languages, first of all, there's a greater likelihood that there will be sounds in there that we have already noticed and been able to produce. We're more confident, we're less self-conscious and so things become easier.

But the first few languages, I think one has to make a special effort to get, you know, a certain minimum level of pronunciation. It doesn't have to be perfect, but, um, yeah, when I hear Sauvignon Blanc, if the person is trying to speak French, to me that's just not good enough. Anyway, there you have it. Enjoy your Sauvignon Blanc.

Bye for now.


Want Better Pronunciation in a Foreign Language? Möchten Sie eine bessere Aussprache in einer Fremdsprache? Want Better Pronunciation in a Foreign Language? ¿Quiere mejorar la pronunciación en un idioma extranjero? Vous voulez une meilleure prononciation dans une langue étrangère ? Volete migliorare la pronuncia di una lingua straniera? 外国語でより良い発音をしたいですか? Chcesz lepszej wymowy w języku obcym? Quer uma melhor pronúncia numa língua estrangeira? Хотите улучшить произношение на иностранном языке? Yabancı Dilde Daha İyi Telaffuz mu İstiyorsunuz? 想要更好的外语发音? 想要更好的外語發音?

Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here and today I'm going to talk about pronunciation. Привет, здесь Стив Кауфманн, и сегодня я собираюсь поговорить о произношении. Merhaba, Steve Kaufmann burada ve bugün telaffuz hakkında konuşacağım. Remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notification. これらのビデオを楽しんでいる場合は、購読して、通知のためにベルをクリックしてください。 Помните, если вам нравятся эти видео, подпишитесь, нажмите на колокольчик, чтобы получить уведомление. Bu videoları beğendiyseniz lütfen abone olun, bildirim için zile tıklayın. And for those of you who listen on Apple Podcasts, please feel free to leave a review. また、Apple Podcasts で聴いている方は、お気軽にレビューを残してください。 А те из вас, кто слушает подкасты Apple, могут оставить отзыв. 对于那些在 Apple 播客上收听的人,请随时发表评论。 We greatly appreciate it. 大変感謝しております。 Мы очень ценим это. Bunu çok takdir ediyoruz. So pronunciation, the reason I want to talk about pronunciation is actually two things that happened today. 発音、私が発音についてお話ししたいのは、実は今日起こった 2 つのことです。 Итак, произношение, причина, по которой я хочу поговорить о произношении, на самом деле состоит в двух вещах, которые произошли сегодня. Yani telaffuz, telaffuz hakkında konuşmak istememin nedeni aslında bugün olan iki şey. First of all, I had, we had house guests, my wife and I. These are very good friends, we knew them from Japan, uh, he was a consul general in Osaka. Zuerst hatte ich, wir hatten Hausgäste, meine Frau und ich. Das sind sehr gute Freunde, wir kannten sie aus Japan, äh, er war Generalkonsul in Osaka. まず、家のゲスト、妻、そして私がいました。彼らはとても良い友達で、日本から知っていました。彼は大阪の総領事でした。 Her şeyden önce, eşim ve ben, ev misafirlerimiz vardı. Bunlar çok iyi arkadaşlar, onları Japonya'dan tanıyorduk, uh, Osaka'da başkonsolostu. 首先,我有,我们有房客,我和我的妻子。他们是非常好的朋友,我们从日本认识他们,呃,他是大阪的总领事。 Uh, he was a language student of Japanese way back when I knew him in the early seventies, he married a Japanese girl. Als ich ihn Anfang der siebziger Jahre kennenlernte, studierte er Japanisch, und er heiratete eine Japanerin. ええと、70年代前半に私が彼を知ったとき、彼は日本語の語学学生でした。彼は日本人の女の子と結婚しました。 Ah, onu yetmişli yılların başında tanıdığımda Japonca dil öğrencisiydi, Japon bir kızla evlendi.

And so, you know, we've seen them from time to time over the last 50 years. そして、ご存知のように、私たちは過去50年間、時々それらを見てきました. Ve bilirsiniz, onları son 50 yılda zaman zaman gördük. They live in Kelowna. 彼らはケロウナに住んでいます。 They came by on their way to Whistler and they overnighted with us and we have, of course, we just talked forever, went for walks and, uh, we were talking about wine and he referred... and he speaks French and he said, uh, Sauvignon Blanc, Sauvignon. Sie kamen auf dem Weg nach Whistler vorbei und haben bei uns übernachtet und wir haben natürlich ewig geredet, sind spazieren gegangen und, äh, wir haben über Wein gesprochen und er hat... und er spricht französisch und er sagte, äh, Sauvignon Blanc, Sauvignon. 彼らはウィスラーに向かう途中で来て、私たちと一緒に一晩過ごしました。ええと、ソーヴィニヨン ブラン、ソーヴィニヨン。

You know, I've heard people say Sauvignon Blanc. Sabes, he oído a la gente decir Sauvignon Blanc. ソーヴィニヨン・ブランという言葉を聞いたことがあります。 He didn't, at least he didn't say Blanc. No lo hizo, al menos no dijo Blanc. 少なくともブランとは言わなかった。 Söylemedi, en azından Blanc demedi. And I thought to myself, he knows, I mean, we have the sound in English. Y pensé para mis adentros, él sabe, quiero decir, tenemos el sonido en inglés. そして、私は自分自身に思いました、彼は知っています、つまり、私たちは英語で音を出しているのです。 Ve kendi kendime düşündüm, o biliyor, yani, bizde İngilizce ses var. It's not Sauvignon it's Sauvignon. ソーヴィニヨンじゃないソーヴィニヨンです。 So we have the word, we have that "o" sound in English. Entonces tenemos la palabra, tenemos ese sonido "o" en inglés. つまり、英語の「o」という言葉があります。 Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc. ソーヴィニヨン、ソーヴィニヨン・ブラン。 But because in English were a bit sloppy in how we pronounce things. Sino porque en ingles somos un poco descuidados en como pronunciamos las cosas. しかし、英語では、物事の発音が少しずさんだったからです。

Now, I'm sure, but I know he's a stickler. Ahora, estoy seguro, pero sé que es un riguroso. 確かに、でも彼が執着家であることは知っています。 Ik weet het zeker, maar ik weet dat hij een doorzetter is. Like I think even in speaking French, he would say Sauvignon, it's Sauvignon. Creo que incluso al hablar francés, diría Sauvignon, es Sauvignon. 私が思うに、フランス語を話すときでさえ、彼はソーヴィニヨンと言うでしょう、それはソーヴィニヨンです. So there's a certain lack of attention to the sounds. ですから、音への注意がある程度不足しています。 Yani seslere belli bir dikkat eksikliği var. You hear this all the time. あなたはいつもこれを聞いています。 Bunu her zaman duyuyorsun. And I think... I'm going to give examples in other languages where our English habits, if we're English speakers, tend to dominate our efforts to speak the foreign language. そして私は思う...私たちが英語を話す人であるならば、私たちの英語の習慣が外国語を話す私たちの努力を支配する傾向がある他の言語で例をあげるつもりです。 Ve sanırım... İngilizce alışkanlıklarımızın, eğer İngilizce konuşuyorsak, yabancı dili konuşma çabalarımıza hakim olma eğiliminde olduğu diğer dillerden örnekler vereceğim. Uh, now the other thing that was brought to my attention, and this is a, I think it was the person's name was maybe Mike Murphy commenting here, uh, on my, uh, one of my YouTube videos about noticing that, uh, and he's been teaching in China for a long time, and the, even with all kinds of work with the international phonetic alphabet IPA, which I find quite unhelpful, but people don't notice certain things. ええと、今、私の注意を引いたもう1つのことです。これは、その人の名前はおそらくマイク・マーフィーがここでコメントしていることだったと思います。彼は長い間中国で教えてきました。国際音声記号IPAを使ったあらゆる種類の仕事でも、私は非常に役に立たないと思いますが、人々は特定のことに気づいていません。 Uh, şimdi dikkatimi çeken diğer şey ve bu, sanırım kişinin adıydı, belki Mike Murphy burada, uh, benim YouTube videolarımdan birinde şunu fark etmekle ilgili yorum yapıyordu, uh, ve uzun süredir Çin'de öğretmenlik yapıyor ve uluslararası fonetik alfabe IPA ile her türlü çalışmasına rağmen oldukça yararsız buluyorum, ancak insanlar bazı şeyleri fark etmiyorlar. And so he noticed though that a lot of Chinese people can't pronounce the word "usually" they say... and absolutely I've heard so many Chinese people say... それで彼は、多くの中国人が彼らが言う「通常」という言葉を発音できないことに気付きました...そして私は本当に多くの中国人が言うのを聞いたことがあります... Ve böylece, birçok Çinli'nin "genellikle" dedikleri kelimeyi telaffuz edemediğini fark etti... ve kesinlikle pek çok Çinlinin şöyle dediğini duydum...

So I'm thinking about those two things. そこで、この2点について考えています。 So in English, we're a bit lazy with our vowels. So the vowelss, we don't say, we don't clearly say Sauvignon. Dus de klinkers, we zeggen niet, we zeggen niet duidelijk Sauvignon. Uh, and that's how English is, you know, we just kind of slur the vowels a little bit. We don't give the vowels the full value, but there are languages where they do like French or Spanish or Japanese, full vowel. In Russian and in Portuguese, some of the vows kind of fall away, but in, in many languages, they want the full value for the vowel. That's not to say that they don't also slur. So in French, you know, we want to have a clear, you know... but people then end up saying...so that they don't give it full value. And, you know, instead of saying... they say...

So all of these things happen, but we have to start by being able to notice the clear, clean, correct pronunciation, and we have to be able to do it. And only once we have that correct pronunciation, the ability to hear it and to reproduce that clear proper sound for that vowel in that language only then can we afford to get sloppy. Ve ancak bir kez bu doğru telaffuza, onu duyma ve o dildeki o sesli harf için o net ve uygun sesi yeniden üretme yeteneğine sahip olduğumuzda, ancak o zaman özensiz olmayı göze alabiliriz. 只有当我们有了正确的发音,有了听音的能力,并能用这种语言再现元音的清晰正确的发音时,我们才可以不马虎。

So, and going back to the Chinese example, of course, if you've ever been to Beijing and taken a taxi, you can, I mean, even as someone who speaks Chinese, it's hard to follow them because it's...it's a very... type of, if they're from Beijing. Entonces, y volviendo al ejemplo chino, por supuesto, si alguna vez has estado en Beijing y tomaste un taxi, puedes, quiero decir, incluso como alguien que habla chino, es difícil seguirlos porque es... es un muy... tipo de, si son de Beijing. Çin örneğine geri dönersek, tabii ki, daha önce Pekin'e gittiyseniz ve taksiye bindiyseniz, yapabilirsiniz, yani, Çince bilen biri olarak bile, onları takip etmek zordur çünkü... çok... bir tür, eğer Pekin'denlerse. Uh, and so maybe that's what carries over into the English instead of going "usually", you know, if you really thought if that Chinese speaker would, would sort of look at it. Uh, y tal vez eso es lo que se traslada al inglés en lugar de decir "por lo general", ya sabes, si realmente pensaras que si ese hablante chino lo haría, lo miraría. And of course the problem in English is that the words aren't written the way they're pronounced. So it's not... there's not a soft... sounded like in French, you know, where you would have a J, which has a... sound usually has that same sound, but it's written S U "usually". Así que no es... no hay un sonido suave... como en francés, ya sabes, donde tendrías una J, que tiene un... sonido por lo general tiene el mismo sonido, pero está escrito SU "generalmente".

And of course, in most words, S U doesn't have that, uh, you know, S value. We say Supreme, Supreme, suffer, uh, English is tough. Decimos Supremo, Supremo, sufre, eh, el inglés es duro. It ain't, it's just tough. No lo es, es simplemente duro. But I think that Chinese speakers and there's so many of them who say... they have to sit down and look at that word and practice saying that word correctly.

And then eventually they'll be able to incorporate that word into a sentence that they speak, you know, at normal speed. And I remember that, you know, now I've learned lots of languages, but French and, uh, and Chinese were my first and I actually worked hard at the pronunciation. I remember the Chinese sound... like ...

we don't have that in English. So I had to work at it and I would pronounce Chinese and I particularly remember... And to the point where the muscles here in my, in my jaw were kind of sore. Así que tuve que esforzarme y pronunciaba chino y lo recuerdo particularmente... Y hasta el punto en que los músculos aquí en mi, en mi mandíbula estaban un poco adoloridos. Uh, I also remember trying very hard to improve my French pronunciation because even though we say like "pronunciation", You really, if you're an English speaker, you have to work hard to force yourself to say "pronunciation", because the tendency from English, which, which is what our brain is set up for is to say "pronunciation" it's not pronounced "pronunciation" it's "pronunciation", and it's, it takes an extra bit of effort to give it that full value. 呃,我还记得我曾非常努力地提高我的法语发音,因为尽管我们说的是 "发音",但如果你是一个说英语的人,你真的必须努力强迫自己说 "发音",因为英语的趋势,也就是我们大脑的设定,是说 "发音",而不是发音 "发音",是 "发音",这需要额外的努力来赋予它完整的价值。 And once you have the full value, you can then "pronunciation" you can kind of slur over it a bit, but if you don't have that essential, you know, that core ability to make those sounds correctly, then you're going to end up with the equivalent of "usually" that the Chinese use for usually.

And this is true in all languages. I mean, Spanish also has pure vowels and they're not dipthongs, so it's not "bueno" an English speaker will say "bueno", "no bueno" or whatever. It's "bueno". "bueno". We have to focus in on that. And I don't think the, uh, international phonetic alphabet helps. I think you have to listen very carefully and then repeat very deliberately.

And, uh, you know, in a way, if you do the mini stories at LingQ you get sentence by sentence and you can hear the natural uh, you know, voice read those sentences. So you can, you can listen to the sound, text to speech for one word, but you can also hear a sentence and then try to imitate it. And when you try to imitate it, really work the jaw muscles so that you're giving it the full value.

If in the case of, uh, if it's Chinese, then it's... The real... is coming in. If it's French...if it's, uh, you know, "bueno", "bueno" cut that "a", it's not a "bueno" it's a "bueno". And we have to hear those things. We have to develop the ability to hear the difference between how we sound and how the native speaker sounds and focus in on some of these key sounds.

So you build up a base, the ability to make these sounds and it's difficult at first, you might make it once, but then within a sentence, you'll lose it. I'll always remember in Montreal, I used to hitchhike to McGill University because you know, it was a long bus ride and there was another fellow hitchhiking and he was an immigrant from Southern Italy and we got friendly.

In fact, we ended up looking for work on construction sites in Montreal together, and his English was terrible and I was trying to help him. And, uh, so he couldn't say small. He would always say "small". Er hat immer "klein" gesagt. And it was frustrating, I said saying no, no, no, no small. Uh, okay. So I would say go small. Ich würde also sagen, mach dich klein. And he went "small" for whatever reason he was preprogrammed to say "small".

Maybe he heard it from other people from Southern Italy. I don't know. I don't know. In the end we worked construction for a couple of months. And then I went down to the dock and I was able to hitchhike on a boat going across to Europe so I worked on a boat going across to Europe and I haven't seen him since. それから波止場に行き、ヨーロッパ行きのボートでヒッチハイクすることができたので、ヨーロッパ行きのボートで働きましたが、それ以来彼に会っていません。

I don't know if he still says "small". Sounds like the... in French and in other languages where they have an...sound, that takes a lot of work. And you know, that traditional sort of suggestion is to go... put your mouth in sort of the shape to go... and then just try and say E so if you go...you'll end up with an... even if you're able to produce the...to get to the point where you can produce it on the fly in a phrase or a sentence, it takes a lot of practice. 你知道,传统的建议是......把你的嘴摆成......然后试着说 E,所以如果你去......你最终会......即使你能够......达到你能在短语或句子中快速说出 E 的程度,也需要大量的练习。

Uh, so you got to notice it, you gotta practice it individually and then you want to get into doing it in sentences. So my suggestion on pronunciation is begin by really focusing, and so if you're a Chinese speaker and you say you were really get ahold of that word, look at it, break it down, say u-su-a-lly, usually, usually, usually usually get to where you can say the word and then usually I like to go, you know, and usually when I study languages, I do this, that or the other. So throw it into a sentence. Now, second suggestion is to pronounce well there's two things we have to do: we got to hear it and we got to be able to produce the sound. We don't have to get a hundred percent, but more or less.

The second thing is we don't want to resist that sound. You know, there are, we don't want to resist anything that has to do with that language. So, you know, Swedish...and if you uh feel self-conscious about doing that, then you won't do it.

So you've got to not feel self-conscious. And in that regard, I find that if you can get a hold of, in that regard our mini stories at LingQ are great because they're kind of narrated without feeling. I enjoyed when I was learning Mandarin, I enjoyed the... dialogues because there was a lot of feeling in those, these comedians telling a story.

And, uh, I think the same when we learn languages, sometimes if we can get ahold of something that's spoken with feeling, that we connect at an emotional level, and sometimes we can have fun with it in different languages. You know, we can say... just sort of get into the... you get into sort of almost like a situation where emotion is involved and so you, you play at the language and so that way you're connecting, you're creating some emotional connection. The phrasiology and the pronunciation. De frasiologie en de uitspraak. So I think all of those things are important.

It begins by getting a grasp on how it's actually pronounced, uh, you know, making the effort to pronounce correctly, which is more effort. It's an effort to say"pronunciation" "Sauvignon Blanc". You gotta work at it until eventually it becomes natural. And then get a hold of something that you can emotionally connect to. Und dann besorge dir etwas, mit dem du dich emotional verbinden kannst.

And then imitate when people speak with some emotion. In most situations, you won't be, you know, kind of wrapped up in that. And, uh, but it, again, it helps. And, and I think for people having learned as many languages as I have, and I have to admit that the first few languages I worked hard on pronunciation.

And then I think that introduces a level of flexibility in the brain. So the subsequent languages, first of all, there's a greater likelihood that there will be sounds in there that we have already noticed and been able to produce. We're more confident, we're less self-conscious and so things become easier.

But the first few languages, I think one has to make a special effort to get, you know, a certain minimum level of pronunciation. It doesn't have to be perfect, but, um, yeah, when I hear Sauvignon Blanc, if the person is trying to speak French, to me that's just not good enough. Anyway, there you have it. Enjoy your Sauvignon Blanc.

Bye for now.