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Steve's Youtube Videos - General Language Learning, Task-Based Language Learning

Task-Based Language Learning

I would rather have a conversation.

I would rather spend time, you know, acquiring information, listening to interesting podcasts and then talk about what I've been listening to and reading. Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here and today I want to talk about task-based language learning. Uh, remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notifications. Uh, if you follow me on a podcast service, uh, please leave a review. I do appreciate it. So task-based language learning. The really, the reason I raise this subject is because I realized just how important it is in language learning to have specific tasks. Um, I noticed this, that if I assign myself a task or if I feel an obligation to do something, or if someone assigns a task to me, then I'm likely to do it simply because it's, it's easy to have a task. If my wife says, you know, chop these vegetables. Okay, chop the vegetables. It's, it helps it's, you don't have to kind of think what should I be doing now?

You have a task, and the same with language learning. So first thing in the morning, uh, typically I'll listen to a podcast and then I'll try and grab the URL if it's on YouTube and somehow get an MP3 file so that I can get it transcribed. So now I've got this task that's developing, I'm listening to this podcast.

I'm, I've got the transcript. I'm studying a transcript onLingQ without even having to think about it. I have this task that I have to do. Um, if my tutor worked to assign me a task, here are three lessons I want you to read them. I want you to save words and phrases or, uh, when we're on our 90-Day Challenge, I'm trying to keep to a certain level in terms of LingQs created are words known. These are very specific things over and above my general interest in the language, specific tasks that help get me going and like so much in life, life it's important to get going. It's important to do something. If you do something, it leads to other things. So tasks I think are very important to keep us, you know, going forward in our language learning activities. But when you say task-based language learning, if you Google for it, you'll find a different definition. And that task-based language instruction is a method of language instruction, where as I understand it, um, the learner is asked to perform a task in the language, uh, not to worry about grammar structures or vocabulary and to incorporate, you know, hand gestures or whatever in order to accomplish a task in the language. Now, I, I don't know whether this is an effective way of teaching the language. To me, it's a little artificial. Uh, it's a bit like this role playing thing, which I also don't particularly like. I would rather have a conversation.

I would rather spend time, you know, acquiring information, listening to interesting podcasts, and then talk about what I've been listening to and reading and sort of gradually see my vocabulary increase, my comprehension level increase. I'm not that interested in, in engaging in these artificial activities.

The, uh, one example of the application of this task-based language instruction, and of course in the field of language instruction there are all kinds of, you know, the latest, you know, fad, uh, as I see it, uh... I'm with Krashen, I think language instruction comes down to comprehensible, compelling input, massive listening and reading, allowing the brain to get used to the language and everything else is kind of refinements, which are either interesting or not very interesting, but maybe not all that necessary.

One application is in Canada we have a thing called the 12 language benchmarks, which again yet another way of grading people's language skills. So we have TOEFL and TOEIC and IELTS and Cambridge. So there's another one, Canadian Language Benchmarks. There are 12 levels and each level tries to describe in terms of, you know, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, speaking, and writing, you know, what the person's level is.

Well, level one, they can't do much. So, you know, can hardly say anything. Okay, that's level one. Level two, can hardly say anything, but can say a little more than level one. In other words, all of the detailed description of what this person is able to do is relatively meaningless to me. The person is gradually getting better, hopefully, and there are no clear, you know, demarcation lines between level three and level four and five. That's why beginner, intermediate and advanced is pretty good because it's simple. It's a fluid thing. It's not like there are steps like this that we go through and we may be progressing more quickly in comprehension, not as quickly in speaking or writing, or we may not even bother with writing.

And so trying to say that at each, you know, benchmark level here is a clear definition of what this person can do. Now, the reason for this is that for this Canadian Language Benchmark system, they, they hope that, um, immigrants, for example, can demonstrate the ability to perform, uh, tasks related to being a clerk, uh, you know, in a supermarket or a receptionist at a hotel, uh, jobs that are considered to be less demanding when it comes to language.

You know, jobs that immigrants could easily fill once they achieved that level. Now of course, here again, uh, I have, uh, met many checkout clerks at supermarkets, many of whom are immigrants, they all speak quite well. I mean, the, the ones that are good at it, they can actually entertain conversations on different subjects.

I don't think it's that useful to try to just train yourself on the limited number of words you need for that. A receptionist at a hotel even more. So I think it's far better to focus on improving your overall level in the language, acquiring more words, doing more listening and reading and not pretending that just because you act out certain roles or certain tasks that that's going to prepare you for that task. You're better to continue to improve your comprehension through lots of listening and reading. And if you have that base, even if when you start in a particular job, you struggle. If you have that comprehension, you have the vocabulary you will eventually improve. And it really doesn't matter. You know where you are, theoretically in the sort of steps of the 12 language benchmarks, what matters is, how do we get the, get the person?

How do we encourage that person? How do we make it easier for that person to continue to improve and get better and better? And I'm not sure that the sort of Canadian Language Benchmark task-based instruction is the way to go. On the other hand, assigning yourself tasks like doing a lot of listening and reading and speaking is probably going to get you there sooner.

So maybe a little bit controversial. I'm sure I'll get some pushback from professional language teachers. Okay. Thanks for listening. Bye.


Task-Based Language Learning

I would rather have a conversation. 私はむしろ会話をしたいです。 我宁愿对话。

I would rather spend time, you know, acquiring information, listening to interesting podcasts and then talk about what I've been listening to and reading. 我宁愿花时间,你知道,获取信息,听有趣的播客,然后谈论我一直在听和读的东西。 Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here and today I want to talk about task-based language learning. 大家好,史蒂夫考夫曼在这里,今天我想谈谈基于任务的语言学习。 Uh, remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notifications. Uh, if you follow me on a podcast service, uh, please leave a review. 呃,如果你在播客服务上关注我,呃,请留下评论。 I do appreciate it. 我很感激。 So task-based language learning. The really, the reason I raise this subject is because I realized just how important it is in language learning to have specific tasks. De echte reden dat ik dit onderwerp ter sprake breng, is omdat ik me realiseerde hoe belangrijk het is bij het leren van talen om specifieke taken te hebben. Um, I noticed this, that if I assign myself a task or if I feel an obligation to do something, or if someone assigns a task to me, then I'm likely to do it simply because it's, it's easy to have a task. 嗯,我注意到了,如果我给自己分配了一项任务,或者我觉得有义务做某事,或者如果有人给我分配了一项任务,那么我很可能会这样做,因为它很容易完成任务. If my wife says, you know, chop these vegetables. 如果我妻子说,你知道,把这些蔬菜切碎。 Okay, chop the vegetables. 好,切菜。 It's, it helps it's, you don't have to kind of think what should I be doing now? 它是,它有帮助,你不必想我现在应该做什么?

You have a task, and the same with language learning. 你有一个任务,语言学习也是如此。 So first thing in the morning, uh, typically I'll listen to a podcast and then I'll try and grab the URL if it's on YouTube and somehow get an MP3 file so that I can get it transcribed. 所以早上的第一件事,嗯,通常我会听一个播客,然后我会尝试抓取 YouTube 上的 URL,然后以某种方式获取一个 MP3 文件,以便我可以将其转录。 So now I've got this task that's developing, I'm listening to this podcast. 所以现在我有这个正在开发的任务,我正在收听这个播客。

I'm, I've got the transcript. 我是,我有成绩单。 I'm studying a transcript onLingQ without even having to think about it. 我正在学习关于LingQ 的成绩单,甚至不用考虑它。 I have this task that I have to do. 我有这个我必须做的任务。 Um, if my tutor worked to assign me a task, here are three lessons I want you to read them. 嗯,如果我的导师工作分配给我一个任务,这里有三节课,我希望你阅读它们。 I want you to save words and phrases or, uh, when we're on our 90-Day Challenge, I'm trying to keep to a certain level in terms of LingQs created are words known. 我希望你保存单词和短语,或者,呃,当我们进行 90 天挑战时,我试图将 LingQ 的创建水平保持在已知单词的水平。 These are very specific things over and above my general interest in the language, specific tasks that help get me going and like so much in life, life it's important to get going. 这些都是非常具体的事情,超出了我对语言的一般兴趣,帮助我前进的具体任务,并且非常喜欢生活,生活很重要。 It's important to do something. If you do something, it leads to other things. So tasks I think are very important to keep us, you know, going forward in our language learning activities. 所以我认为任务对于让我们在语言学习活动中继续前进非常重要。 But when you say task-based language learning, if you Google for it, you'll find a different definition. 但是当你说基于任务的语言学习时,如果你用谷歌搜索它,你会发现一个不同的定义。 And that task-based language instruction is a method of language instruction, where as I understand it, um, the learner is asked to perform a task in the language, uh, not to worry about grammar structures or vocabulary and to incorporate, you know, hand gestures or whatever in order to accomplish a task in the language. 而基于任务的语言教学是一种语言教学的方法,据我了解,嗯,学习者被要求用语言执行任务,呃,不用担心语法结构或词汇并结合,你知道的,手势或其他任何东西,以完成语言中的任务。 Now, I, I don't know whether this is an effective way of teaching the language. 现在,我,我不知道这是否是一种有效的语言教学方式。 To me, it's a little artificial. Uh, it's a bit like this role playing thing, which I also don't particularly like. 呃,有点像这个角色扮演的东西,我也不是特别喜欢。 I would rather have a conversation. 我宁愿对话。

I would rather spend time, you know, acquiring information, listening to interesting podcasts, and then talk about what I've been listening to and reading and sort of gradually see my vocabulary increase, my comprehension level increase. I'm not that interested in, in engaging in these artificial activities. 我对从事这些人为的活动并不感兴趣。

The, uh, one example of the application of this task-based language instruction, and of course in the field of language instruction there are all kinds of, you know, the latest, you know, fad, uh, as I see it, uh... I'm with Krashen, I think language instruction comes down to comprehensible, compelling input, massive listening and reading, allowing the brain to get used to the language and everything else is kind of refinements, which are either interesting or not very interesting, but maybe not all that necessary. 呃,这个任务型语言教学应用的一个例子,当然在语言教学领域有各种各样的,你知道的,最新的,你知道的,时尚,呃,我看到的,呃...我和 Krashen 在一起,我认为语言教学归结为可理解的、令人信服的输入、大量的听力和阅读,让大脑适应语言,其他一切都是一种改进,有趣或不有趣非常有趣,但也许不是那么必要。

One application is in Canada we have a thing called the 12 language benchmarks, which again yet another way of grading people's language skills. 一个应用程序是在加拿大,我们有一个称为 12 语言基准的东西,这又是另一种对人们的语言技能进行评分的方法。 So we have TOEFL and TOEIC and IELTS and Cambridge. 所以我们有托福、托业、雅思和剑桥。 So there's another one, Canadian Language Benchmarks. 所以还有另一个,加拿大语言基准。 There are 12 levels and each level tries to describe in terms of, you know, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, speaking, and writing, you know, what the person's level is.

Well, level one, they can't do much. So, you know, can hardly say anything. Okay, that's level one. Level two, can hardly say anything, but can say a little more than level one. In other words, all of the detailed description of what this person is able to do is relatively meaningless to me. 换句话说,所有关于这个人能够做什么的详细描述对我来说都是没有意义的。 The person is gradually getting better, hopefully, and there are no clear, you know, demarcation lines between level three and level four and five. That's why beginner, intermediate and advanced is pretty good because it's simple. It's a fluid thing. It's not like there are steps like this that we go through and we may be progressing more quickly in comprehension, not as quickly in speaking or writing, or we may not even bother with writing.

And so trying to say that at each, you know, benchmark level here is a clear definition of what this person can do. Now, the reason for this is that for this Canadian Language Benchmark system, they, they hope that, um, immigrants, for example, can demonstrate the ability to perform, uh, tasks related to being a clerk, uh, you know, in a supermarket or a receptionist at a hotel, uh, jobs that are considered to be less demanding when it comes to language.

You know, jobs that immigrants could easily fill once they achieved that level. You know, jobs that immigrants could easily fill once they achieved that level. Now of course, here again, uh, I have, uh, met many checkout clerks at supermarkets, many of whom are immigrants, they all speak quite well. I mean, the, the ones that are good at it, they can actually entertain conversations on different subjects.

I don't think it's that useful to try to just train yourself on the limited number of words you need for that. A receptionist at a hotel even more. So I think it's far better to focus on improving your overall level in the language, acquiring more words, doing more listening and reading and not pretending that just because you act out certain roles or certain tasks that that's going to prepare you for that task. You're better to continue to improve your comprehension through lots of listening and reading. And if you have that base, even if when you start in a particular job, you struggle. If you have that comprehension, you have the vocabulary you will eventually improve. And it really doesn't matter. You know where you are, theoretically in the sort of steps of the 12 language benchmarks, what matters is, how do we get the, get the person?

How do we encourage that person? How do we make it easier for that person to continue to improve and get better and better? And I'm not sure that the sort of Canadian Language Benchmark task-based instruction is the way to go. On the other hand, assigning yourself tasks like doing a lot of listening and reading and speaking is probably going to get you there sooner.

So maybe a little bit controversial. I'm sure I'll get some pushback from professional language teachers. Okay. Thanks for listening. Bye.