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Steve's Youtube Videos - General Language Learning, Productivity Hacks for Language Learning

Productivity Hacks for Language Learning

Where I have done really well in language learning is when I have had that sort of dedicated time. Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here and today, I want to talk about productivity hacks and language learning. And remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notifications. And if you're following me on a podcast service, please leave a review.

It's always appreciated. So I was thinking about productivity because something that I saw on the web somewhere talked about productivity hacks. And so I thought to myself, well, maybe there are some, some hints there, some hacks about... with regard to general productivity, that can be useful for language learning.

So I Googled and if you Google, you'll find lots of them and they're very similar, basically, you know, make a to-do list, limit distractions, uh, get enough sleep, eat well. I mean, they're all quite similar and largely things that we could think up ourselves. One of the interesting things I found there though, was a thing called the pomodoro technique. Pomodoro Is Italian for tomato and the jist of that is that you should work in 25 minute batches and you get a little timer so that at the end of 25 minutes, you stop whatever you're doing, get up, stretch, take a rest and go back to it again. So as I looked at these, I realized that actually, uh, none of this really applies to my form of language learning because my form of language learning is actually recreational. So I do it for fun whenever I have the time, uh, I'm not actually working at a job where I have to keep other distractions away. The language learning is my distraction. I enjoy doing it. I can try doing it in 25 minutes, uh, batches, but if I'm enjoying, uh, reading something on the iPad, I may go on for 40 minutes or I might stop after 15. My major learning activity is just plain listening. So in a way I... so, I, I, I don't, I'm not sort of totally committed because I'll listen while exercising, listen, while doing the dishes, listen while in the car. And that's giving me my language learning time, however, to be fair, um, where I have done really well in language learning is when I have had sort of dedicated time.

So for example, when I learned Chinese, uh, in a year, I became fluent enough to do interpreting, translating, uh, translating newspaper articles from Chinese in English, from English into Chinese. I've spent more than two years on Arabic and Farsi, a little bit of Turkish, a little bit of this and that. Uh, and I'm nowhere near as far ahead.

So I thought about that, where I really developed quickly was in my Ukrainian because I went to Lviv and for a week I had six hours a day of instruction with my tutor. So, and, uh, we would meet for a coffee and we would spend three months, uh, three hours chatting or visiting a cathedral or a church or a, you know, a cemetery or castle or whatever it was in Lviv, or a museum.

And then I'd get notes from her and I would review them in LingQ and we meet again in the afternoon. So I had six hours and in the case of my Chinese, I had three hours a day. One-on-one, every day and we have to talk and I had to try to produce the language and really what I am now doing in my Arabic and Farsi in a way is, is the things that I did away from my class, listening and reading.

Um, and not in a very, you know, I'm not, I don't have any assignments. I sort of do what I want to do. So I thought about that and I said, you know, if I were to design, so ideal scenario is I go off to Iran or I go off to Egypt and I have a teacher for three hours a day, and then I spent the rest of the time listening and reading and going to bookstores and immersing myself in the environment.

Then after three months or six months, uh, I will probably progress quite quickly and I'll make friends and I'll have opportunities to use the language and stuff. However, I'm not in a position to do that. So what's the next best thing? So I thought to myself, if I had, if I could set up three hours a day with a tutor in Arabic or Persian, and so that is a commitment. So we've got like a five minute break in between, and maybe I would have three different tutors, uh, which I could arrange, uh, then, and we would have the sessions sort of, they would be kind of like when I toured Lviv. So we would either go to different cities in Iran or different areas of Egypt or visit, you know, the pyramids or visit Luxor, Iran or whatever it might be, or we might say we're going to talk about history for a certain period of time. So there would be the sense that I am touring the culture or the country and of the three hours, maybe one hour would be spent on just plain the structures of the language. Uh, one of the things I did for Romanian was I had a bunch of these patterns in English using, you know, if, therefore, because, uh, on the other hand, like a whole bunch of different conjunctions, different verb tenses, different prepositions, and then a series of phrases, patterns that kind of get triggered by those conjunctions or those words or that, uh, typify how the different tenses are used. And so. Uh, I hope I'm not losing you here, but if I spend one hour of the three hours, one-on-one with my tutor going through these patterns, different pattern each time, which I could then review later on again, and then two hours touring the country geographically, or touring the country from a cultural or historical point of view or food or carpets or whatever it might be, so that there would be a sort of a focus, there would be a focus of our conversation, uh, it would bring some discipline into what I'm doing. I would then have the rest of the day, um, to listen and read and do other things. This was what I did with Chinese. It was like six, seven hours a day. The problem with that is I'm not prepared to do it because my wife and I enjoy golfing.

We enjoy other activities. We enjoy our leasurly breakfast. We enjoy so many other things that we're doing that I kind of have to try hard to sneak my language learning in there. When I was working for the Canadian government learning Mandarin, that was my job. They were paying my salary. So I didn't think of doing anything else.

I just showed up at nine o'clock at my school. And in the afternoon I went home and I studied, and that was my job. So, uh, obviously the degree of motivation, you know, uh, that I had at that time was, was much stronger than what I have now. Uh, many of you who are learning languages, you may be either in the dilettante mode, which is what I'm in, in my Persian and Arabic, or have been in my other languages that I've been learning.

Or if you are in a position where you can dedicate yourself, then my suggested productivity hack is that you set aside three hours a day one-on-one with a tutor. One of the three hours is on structure patterns, that kind of thing. And two of them on discovering the culture and the history and the country.

And then in the afternoon, if you have that much time to spend on the language, spend that time listening and preparing for that next focused, uh, lesson that you're going to have with your tutor, which focusing therefore either on patterns or some aspect of the culture. So that then brings some structure into your life.

Uh, I think all of that would be very useful in terms of increasing your productivity, assuming you have the time, but in the meantime, you can also Google productivity hacks find the Pomodoro technique, and you may find some things there that, uh, helps you increase your level of productivity in your learning activities.

So there you have it. I hope that was useful. Bye for now.


Productivity Hacks for Language Learning

Where I have done really well in language learning is when I have had that sort of dedicated time. Where I have done really well in language learning is when I have had that sort of dedicated time. Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here and today, I want to talk about productivity hacks and language learning. And remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notifications. And if you're following me on a podcast service, please leave a review.

It's always appreciated. So I was thinking about productivity because something that I saw on the web somewhere talked about productivity hacks. And so I thought to myself, well, maybe there are some, some hints there, some hacks about... with regard to general productivity, that can be useful for language learning.

So I Googled and if you Google, you'll find lots of them and they're very similar, basically, you know, make a to-do list, limit distractions, uh, get enough sleep, eat well. I mean, they're all quite similar and largely things that we could think up ourselves. One of the interesting things I found there though, was a thing called the pomodoro technique. Pomodoro Is Italian for tomato and the jist of that is that you should work in 25 minute batches and you get a little timer so that at the end of 25 minutes, you stop whatever you're doing, get up, stretch, take a rest and go back to it again. So as I looked at these, I realized that actually, uh, none of this really applies to my form of language learning because my form of language learning is actually recreational. So I do it for fun whenever I have the time, uh, I'm not actually working at a job where I have to keep other distractions away. The language learning is my distraction. I enjoy doing it. I can try doing it in 25 minutes, uh, batches, but if I'm enjoying, uh, reading something on the iPad, I may go on for 40 minutes or I might stop after 15. My major learning activity is just plain listening. Mijn belangrijkste leeractiviteit is gewoon luisteren. So in a way I... so, I, I, I don't, I'm not sort of totally committed because I'll listen while exercising, listen, while doing the dishes, listen while in the car. And that's giving me my language learning time, however, to be fair, um, where I have done really well in language learning is when I have had sort of dedicated time.

So for example, when I learned Chinese, uh, in a year, I became fluent enough to do interpreting, translating, uh, translating newspaper articles from Chinese in English, from English into Chinese. I've spent more than two years on Arabic and Farsi, a little bit of Turkish, a little bit of this and that. Uh, and I'm nowhere near as far ahead.

So I thought about that, where I really developed quickly was in my Ukrainian because I went to Lviv and for a week I had six hours a day of instruction with my tutor. So, and, uh, we would meet for a coffee and we would spend three months, uh, three hours chatting or visiting a cathedral or a church or a, you know, a cemetery or castle or whatever it was in Lviv, or a museum.

And then I'd get notes from her and I would review them in LingQ and we meet again in the afternoon. So I had six hours and in the case of my Chinese, I had three hours a day. One-on-one, every day and we have to talk and I had to try to produce the language and really what I am now doing in my Arabic and Farsi in a way is, is the things that I did away from my class, listening and reading.

Um, and not in a very, you know, I'm not, I don't have any assignments. I sort of do what I want to do. So I thought about that and I said, you know, if I were to design, so ideal scenario is I go off to Iran or I go off to Egypt and I have a teacher for three hours a day, and then I spent the rest of the time listening and reading and going to bookstores and immersing myself in the environment.

Then after three months or six months, uh, I will probably progress quite quickly and I'll make friends and I'll have opportunities to use the language and stuff. However, I'm not in a position to do that. So what's the next best thing? So I thought to myself, if I had, if I could set up three hours a day with a tutor in Arabic or Persian, and so that is a commitment. So we've got like a five minute break in between, and maybe I would have three different tutors, uh, which I could arrange, uh, then, and we would have the sessions sort of, they would be kind of like when I toured Lviv. So we would either go to different cities in Iran or different areas of Egypt or visit, you know, the pyramids or visit Luxor, Iran or whatever it might be, or we might say we're going to talk about history for a certain period of time. So there would be the sense that I am touring the culture or the country and of the three hours, maybe one hour would be spent on just plain the structures of the language. Uh, one of the things I did for Romanian was I had a bunch of these patterns in English using, you know, if, therefore, because, uh, on the other hand, like a whole bunch of different conjunctions, different verb tenses, different prepositions, and then a series of phrases, patterns that kind of get triggered by those conjunctions or those words or that, uh, typify how the different tenses are used. And so. Uh, I hope I'm not losing you here, but if I spend one hour of the three hours, one-on-one with my tutor going through these patterns, different pattern each time, which I could then review later on again, and then two hours touring the country geographically, or touring the country from a cultural or historical point of view or food or carpets or whatever it might be, so that there would be a sort of a focus, there would be a focus of our conversation, uh, it would bring some discipline into what I'm doing. I would then have the rest of the day, um, to listen and read and do other things. This was what I did with Chinese. It was like six, seven hours a day. The problem with that is I'm not prepared to do it because my wife and I enjoy golfing.

We enjoy other activities. We enjoy our leasurly breakfast. We genieten van ons rustig ontbijt. We enjoy so many other things that we're doing that I kind of have to try hard to sneak my language learning in there. When I was working for the Canadian government learning Mandarin, that was my job. They were paying my salary. So I didn't think of doing anything else.

I just showed up at nine o'clock at my school. And in the afternoon I went home and I studied, and that was my job. So, uh, obviously the degree of motivation, you know, uh, that I had at that time was, was much stronger than what I have now. Uh, many of you who are learning languages, you may be either in the dilettante mode, which is what I'm in, in my Persian and Arabic, or have been in my other languages that I've been learning.

Or if you are in a position where you can dedicate yourself, then my suggested productivity hack is that you set aside three hours a day one-on-one with a tutor. One of the three hours is on structure patterns, that kind of thing. And two of them on discovering the culture and the history and the country.

And then in the afternoon, if you have that much time to spend on the language, spend that time listening and preparing for that next focused, uh, lesson that you're going to have with your tutor, which focusing therefore either on patterns or some aspect of the culture. So that then brings some structure into your life.

Uh, I think all of that would be very useful in terms of increasing your productivity, assuming you have the time, but in the meantime, you can also Google productivity hacks find the Pomodoro technique, and you may find some things there that, uh, helps you increase your level of productivity in your learning activities. ええと、時間があるとすれば、生産性を上げるという点では、これらすべてが非常に役立つと思いますが、それまでの間、Googleの生産性ハックでポモドーロテクニックを見つけることもできます。 、学習活動の生産性のレベルを上げるのに役立ちます。

So there you have it. だからあなたはそれを持っています。 I hope that was useful. Bye for now.