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Steve's Youtube Videos - General Language Learning, Power Language Learning Week 4: Managing Your Time When Learning a New Language

Power Language Learning Week 4: Managing Your Time When Learning a New Language

Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here today to talk about language learning again, of course, and to talk specifically about managing your time -- time management. If you enjoy these videos, please subscribe. If you like the video, give me a thumbs up if you want.

First of all, why do I even do these videos or why do I spend so much time on language learning. It's because I like doing it. I enjoy learning languages. It gives me a lot. It fills my life with things that are interesting to me. I could be doing other things. Who knows why we devote ourselves to this or that activity. It's important, though, to think that what we are doing is worthwhile, then we derive satisfaction from doing it. That's certainly my approach to language learning. I enjoy doing it. I enjoy sharing my enthusiasm with others and sharing my experience with others. I probably spend more time on language learning than most people. So, to that extent, what I do may be a valuable point of reference for others.

So, managing our time… I'm going to talk about three points, actually. Obviously, right now where I'm committing myself to learning three languages every day, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, time management becomes an issue. Otherwise, I'll just do one of these languages and run out of time to do the others or won't find enough time to put any significant amount of time in any of them. So

The first thing I've done is to make sure that I have some very specific, concrete goals. Not a general goal like I want to speak three languages, but rather specific goals. The number one goal I've set for myself is to create 100 links every day in each language.

Creating Links

People ask, what does that mean? If you go to my website, the one that I use that I co-founded with my son LingQ.com, you will see that the act of looking up a word that we have not seen before, which is highlighted in blue on the system, is called creating a link. You then see a number of possible meanings for that word. It's then saved to your database and a number of functions and assists to learning that word and learning the language are activated on the website.

Concrete Goals

Goal number one for me is to create 100 links in each language. That means once I reach 100 I go to the next language. Once I've gone through all three languages, at least I've covered that. So that is a concrete goal.

The goals that drive language learning for me are creating links. That means you're forcing yourself into new material. You're discovering new material. You're not just staying with things that are easy and familiar. You have to find blue words, words you haven't seen before. You have to move forward into material you haven't read before.

The second thing is the overall number of words you read is an important counter, so I do watch it. The linking activity, creating these links, drives me, but I want to make sure that I read material where I've perhaps already gone through and created the links, but I'll read them again.

The third major driver of my language learning is listening, but the listening is much easier because I listen whenever I can. I don't deliberately sit down to listen. I listen while doing the dishes. I listen in the car. I listen while exercising. I listen on the bicycle. I listen.

Now, of course, since I'm now doing three languages, if I look at my statistics I find that my reading number, if I look over the last month let's say, looking at my statistics in LingQ (you can go to your profile and you see last week, the last two weeks, last month, the last three months, whatever you want to look at, you'll see what your level of activity has been) I see that my number of links is off the chart because nobody is creating 300 links a day like I am, so I'm well beyond the sort of targets that LingQ assigns.

On my reading, I'm more or less keeping up to my target in each language. That means I am reading a lot combined. But, of course, in each individual language I'm more or less keeping up to the targets at LingQ, so about 1,500 words in each of those languages.

When it comes to the listening, I'm doing less listening than is recommended because I'm dividing my listening up between the three languages. The listening is usually just the dead time, when I'm doing something else and, therefore, I listen.

So I have those goals. The driving goal is to create links, but I do follow my reading number and my listening number. The rest will take care of itself. Converting links to known, known words, all of that will naturally increase as I continue linking, listening and reading because as I come across words that I've linked before, that I've seen for the third, fourth, fifth, eighth time, eventually I move them to known.

Those are the goals. So that's point number one in terms of time management.

Be Prepared to Experiment

Point number two, be prepared to experiment. Find which way of learning, which way of using your time works best for you. For example, when I started I would just think of making sure that I save 100 links every day. Then I'd find that it would be 10:30 at night and I'd look up my statistics and I only had 50 links in Turkish or in Arabic. So then I'd have to sit there at 10:30 at night and go through material, which I don't really like to do because before going to bed I'll read a book in English on something.

I don't necessarily want to be under the gun to create 100 links at 10:30 at night, so what I've now decided to do is the first thing in the morning I create my 100 links in each language. I have also decided that wherever I find material that has a lot of unknown words, I go through and I just link the blue words. I don't read the words in between because it takes too long, especially in Arabic and Persian where I'm reading in the Arabic script, which I'm not very good at so it goes very slowly. Turkish is a lot faster because it's written in the Latin alphabet. So I through there and before my wife gets up I've gone through and I've knocked off 100 links created in each of three languages. Now I can relax because I've got that behind me.

Now, that's something that I just started doing a week ago. We'll see how that goes, but so far I'm enjoying it. I think that's a good way to go. After that, I find time to read. When I read, typically, I'm going to find yellow words, previously saved links where I now know those words. I'm not setting myself a target. When I come across them I move them to known or I move them from status 1 to status 2 or status 3.

Again, it's explaining how LingQ works, but if I go through a lesson just linking then the system thinks I've read that lesson. So if I read it a second time I don't manually add reading. However, if I read it a third time I might manually add the reading number. Although, the manually-added reading number is not counted in your activity index, something to think of.

In a way, I'm cheating because when I go through there creating those links the system thinks I've read that article or that lesson, but I haven't. Then I make a point of going back to read again, listen and read to make sure I go over that material properly and read it because reading is very important. So I experiment.

Now, it may be in two weeks that I find that there is some other combination of these activities that works better for me, but right now I'm enjoying it. I find that even going through and linking a bunch of new words is exposure to these words at some level and then when I go back in later I've kind of gone over the same material a second time, this time going through every word, whereas before I was just jumping word to word. Of course, a lot of this material is, for example, podcasts that I've downloaded and then I listen. So I'm going over sort of the same material in different ways understanding parts of it each time, but I do sense, definitely, that I hear the three languages more clearly. I am making more sense of these three languages, so, so far, I feel this is working.

Whatever You're Doing, Try to Enjoy It

That brings me to the third element of managing your time. First of all, set yourself goals. Don't be afraid to experiment and to vary your activities. Third of all, whatever you're doing, try to enjoy it and try to believe that what you are doing is worthwhile. I believe that what I am now doing is worthwhile, that it is working, that I am improving, that I understand these podcasts when I listen to them much better than I did before. That's my impression. I feel good about what I am doing. I don't wish I were doing something else. I don't wish that I were, I don't know, reviewing words in an Anki deck or whatever. However, if you like reviewing words in an Anki deck make sure you enjoy doing that and that you believe that that is worthwhile doing.

So managing your time, a part of that is also to feel that whatever activity you're committed to doing or whatever method of learning you use, you think that's a good use of your time. You feel happy about what you're doing. I think an important element of managing your time is sort of staying in the moment and thinking that this is where I want to be and this is what I want to be doing.

So there you have it, that's my little spiel with reference to my own experience on managing your time as a language learner. Again, if you would like to receive my 10 emails on 10 Tips on Language Learning, please click on the button here on the screen. I look forward to your comments, bye for now.


Power Language Learning Week 4: Managing Your Time When Learning a New Language

Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here today to talk about language learning again, of course, and to talk specifically about managing your time -- time management. If you enjoy these videos, please subscribe. これらのビデオを楽しんでいる場合は、購読してください。 If you like the video, give me a thumbs up if you want.

First of all, why do I even do these videos or why do I spend so much time on language learning. It's because I like doing it. I enjoy learning languages. It gives me a lot. It fills my life with things that are interesting to me. I could be doing other things. Who knows why we devote ourselves to this or that activity. なぜ私たちがこの活動やその活動に専念するのか誰にも分かりません。 It's important, though, to think that what we are doing is worthwhile, then we derive satisfaction from doing it. That's certainly my approach to language learning. Essa é certamente a minha abordagem para o aprendizado de línguas. I enjoy doing it. I enjoy sharing my enthusiasm with others and sharing my experience with others. I probably spend more time on language learning than most people. So, to that extent, what I do may be a valuable point of reference for others. ですから、その範囲で、私がしていることは、他の人にとって貴重な参考になるかもしれません。

So, managing our time… I'm going to talk about three points, actually. Obviously, right now where I'm committing myself to learning three languages every day, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, time management becomes an issue. Otherwise, I'll just do one of these languages and run out of time to do the others or won't find enough time to put any significant amount of time in any of them. Caso contrário, farei apenas uma dessas linguagens e ficarei sem tempo para fazer as outras ou não encontrarei tempo suficiente para dedicar uma quantidade significativa de tempo em nenhuma delas. So

The first thing I've done is to make sure that I have some very specific, concrete goals. Not a general goal like I want to speak three languages, but rather specific goals. The number one goal I've set for myself is to create 100 links every day in each language.

Creating Links

People ask, what does that mean? If you go to my website, the one that I use that I co-founded with my son LingQ.com, you will see that the act of looking up a word that we have not seen before, which is highlighted in blue on the system, is called creating a link. You then see a number of possible meanings for that word. It's then saved to your database and a number of functions and assists to learning that word and learning the language are activated on the website.

Concrete Goals Konkrete Ziele

Goal number one for me is to create 100 links in each language. That means once I reach 100 I go to the next language. Once I've gone through all three languages, at least I've covered that. 3つの言語すべてを読み終えたら、少なくともそれについては説明しました。 So that is a concrete goal.

The goals that drive language learning for me are creating links. That means you're forcing yourself into new material. You're discovering new material. You're not just staying with things that are easy and familiar. You have to find blue words, words you haven't seen before. You have to move forward into material you haven't read before.

The second thing is the overall number of words you read is an important counter, so I do watch it. 第二に、あなたが読んだ単語の総数は重要なカウンターなので、私はそれを見ています。 The linking activity, creating these links, drives me, but I want to make sure that I read material where I've perhaps already gone through and created the links, but I'll read them again.

The third major driver of my language learning is listening, but the listening is much easier because I listen whenever I can. Der dritte Haupttreiber meines Sprachenlernens ist das Zuhören, aber das Zuhören ist viel einfacher, weil ich zuhöre, wann immer ich kann. I don't deliberately sit down to listen. わざと座って聞くことはしません。 I listen while doing the dishes. I listen in the car. I listen while exercising. I listen on the bicycle. I listen.

Now, of course, since I'm now doing three languages, if I look at my statistics I find that my reading number, if I look over the last month let's say, looking at my statistics in LingQ (you can go to your profile and you see last week, the last two weeks, last month, the last three months, whatever you want to look at, you'll see what your level of activity has been) I see that my number of links is off the chart because nobody is creating 300 links a day like I am, so I'm well beyond the sort of targets that LingQ assigns.

On my reading, I'm more or less keeping up to my target in each language. That means I am reading a lot combined. But, of course, in each individual language I'm more or less keeping up to the targets at LingQ, so about 1,500 words in each of those languages.

When it comes to the listening, I'm doing less listening than is recommended because I'm dividing my listening up between the three languages. リスニングに関しては、リスニングを3つの言語に分割しているため、推奨よりもリスニングが少なくなっています。 The listening is usually just the dead time, when I'm doing something else and, therefore, I listen.

So I have those goals. The driving goal is to create links, but I do follow my reading number and my listening number. The rest will take care of itself. Converting links to known, known words, all of that will naturally increase as I continue linking, listening and reading because as I come across words that I've linked before, that I've seen for the third, fourth, fifth, eighth time, eventually I move them to known. Convertendo links em palavras conhecidas, tudo isso aumentará naturalmente conforme eu continuo conectando, ouvindo e lendo, porque conforme encontro palavras que vinculei antes, que vi pela terceira, quarta, quinta, oitava vez , eventualmente eu os movo para conhecidos.

Those are the goals. So that's point number one in terms of time management. Das ist also Punkt Nummer eins in Bezug auf Zeitmanagement. 因此,这是时间管理的第一要点。

Be Prepared to Experiment

Point number two, be prepared to experiment. Find which way of learning, which way of using your time works best for you. For example, when I started I would just think of making sure that I save 100 links every day. Then I'd find that it would be 10:30 at night and I'd look up my statistics and I only had 50 links in Turkish or in Arabic. それから私はそれが夜の10:30であることがわかり、統計を調べたところ、トルコ語またはアラビア語で50のリンクしかありませんでした。 So then I'd have to sit there at 10:30 at night and go through material, which I don't really like to do because before going to bed I'll read a book in English on something.

I don't necessarily want to be under the gun to create 100 links at 10:30 at night, so what I've now decided to do is the first thing in the morning I create my 100 links in each language. Ich möchte nicht unbedingt unter der Waffe sein, um um 10:30 Uhr nachts 100 Links zu erstellen. Deshalb habe ich mich jetzt entschlossen, als erstes am Morgen meine 100 Links in jeder Sprache zu erstellen. 夜の10時30分に100個のリンクを作成するために、必ずしも銃の下にいる必要はありません。そのため、今朝最初に、各言語で100個のリンクを作成することにしました。 I have also decided that wherever I find material that has a lot of unknown words, I go through and I just link the blue words. I don't read the words in between because it takes too long, especially in Arabic and Persian where I'm reading in the Arabic script, which I'm not very good at so it goes very slowly. Não leio as palavras intermediárias porque leva muito tempo, especialmente em árabe e persa, onde leio na escrita árabe, que não sou muito bom nisso, por isso é muito lento. Turkish is a lot faster because it's written in the Latin alphabet. So I through there and before my wife gets up I've gone through and I've knocked off 100 links created in each of three languages. Also bin ich durch und bevor meine Frau aufsteht, bin ich durchgegangen und habe 100 Links, die in jeder der drei Sprachen erstellt wurden, abgeschlagen. Então eu passei por lá e antes que minha esposa se levantasse, já passei e derrubei 100 links criados em cada um dos três idiomas. Now I can relax because I've got that behind me.

Now, that's something that I just started doing a week ago. We'll see how that goes, but so far I'm enjoying it. Veremos como vai, mas até agora estou gostando. I think that's a good way to go. After that, I find time to read. When I read, typically, I'm going to find yellow words, previously saved links where I now know those words. 私が読むとき、通常、私は黄色の単語、以前に保存されたリンクを見つけ、それらの単語を今知っています。 I'm not setting myself a target. Não estou estabelecendo um alvo para mim. When I come across them I move them to known or I move them from status 1 to status 2 or status 3.

Again, it's explaining how LingQ works, but if I go through a lesson just linking then the system thinks I've read that lesson. Novamente, ele está explicando como o LingQ funciona, mas se eu passar por uma lição apenas vinculando, o sistema pensa que li essa lição. So if I read it a second time I don't manually add reading. Portanto, se eu ler uma segunda vez, não adicionarei a leitura manualmente. However, if I read it a third time I might manually add the reading number. No entanto, se eu ler pela terceira vez, posso adicionar manualmente o número da leitura. Although, the manually-added reading number is not counted in your activity index, something to think of.

In a way, I'm cheating because when I go through there creating those links the system thinks I've read that article or that lesson, but I haven't. De certa forma, estou trapaceando porque quando passo por lá criando esses links, o sistema pensa que li aquele artigo ou aquela lição, mas não li. Then I make a point of going back to read again, listen and read to make sure I go over that material properly and read it because reading is very important. So I experiment.

Now, it may be in two weeks that I find that there is some other combination of these activities that works better for me, but right now I'm enjoying it. I find that even going through and linking a bunch of new words is exposure to these words at some level and then when I go back in later I've kind of gone over the same material a second time, this time going through every word, whereas before I was just jumping word to word. Of course, a lot of this material is, for example, podcasts that I've downloaded and then I listen. So I'm going over sort of the same material in different ways understanding parts of it each time, but I do sense, definitely, that I hear the three languages more clearly. I am making more sense of these three languages, so, so far, I feel this is working.

Whatever You're Doing, Try to Enjoy It

That brings me to the third element of managing your time. First of all, set yourself goals. Don't be afraid to experiment and to vary your activities. Third of all, whatever you're doing, try to enjoy it and try to believe that what you are doing is worthwhile. I believe that what I am now doing is worthwhile, that it is working, that I am improving, that I understand these podcasts when I listen to them much better than I did before. That's my impression. I feel good about what I am doing. I don't wish I were doing something else. I don't wish that I were, I don't know, reviewing words in an Anki deck or whatever. However, if you like reviewing words in an Anki deck make sure you enjoy doing that and that you believe that that is worthwhile doing.

So managing your time, a part of that is also to feel that whatever activity you're committed to doing or whatever method of learning you use, you think that's a good use of your time. You feel happy about what you're doing. I think an important element of managing your time is sort of staying in the moment and thinking that this is where I want to be and this is what I want to be doing.

So there you have it, that's my little spiel with reference to my own experience on managing your time as a language learner. Da haben Sie es also, das ist mein kleines Spiel in Bezug auf meine eigenen Erfahrungen mit der Verwaltung Ihrer Zeit als Sprachschüler. 因此,您所拥有的,这就是我在管理自己作为语言学习者的时间方面的经验而感到不满。 Again, if you would like to receive my 10 emails on 10 Tips on Language Learning, please click on the button here on the screen. I look forward to your comments, bye for now.