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Steve's Language Learning Tips, Pitch Accent: Is It Important?

Pitch Accent: Is It Important?

Hi, Steve Kaufmann here again, and today I'm going to talk about whether pitch accent is important in learning languages like Japanese. Remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notifications. So, first of all, I'm back home. All right. Uh, I was in Palm Springs for six weeks.

I went there for a variety of reasons. First of all, our house needed, our house down there needed some work to be done on it. Uh, also, we were doing some work here, so it was very messy, drywall dust and so forth. So we went down there and we also got our second dose of the vaccine. And then Friday night we came back home and I'll go, I'll explain that a little bit later, but pitch accent.

So there's quite a debate about pitch accent, particularly in Japanese. And I will post the link in the description box to a person who speaks flawless Japanese, like a Japanese person. And he is a proponent of studying pitch accent. His name is Dogan, and I will also show you a link to a video by another person whose name escapes me, who says that pitch accent is not worth worrying about.

And I will leave a third link to a description of pitch accent from Wikipedia. So pitch accent is, uh, and it doesn't just exist in Japanese. It's the idea that in languages we have varying intonation. All right. Intonation, that's not necessarily tied to the meaning of a word. So. In Chinese, if you say a Chinese word with the wrong tone, it's a different meaning altogether.

And people can be confused or have difficulty understanding you if you use the wrong tones. That is not the case in Japanese. Other, uh, languages, which according to Wikipedia have this, uh, pitch accent include Swedish, Turkish, Persian, Western Basque. Okay, just Western Basque. Uh, and I can't remember how... ancient Greek a number of languages that, um, according to them, Serbo-Croation have this pitch accent issue.

Now, let me say upfront that I lived in Japan for nine years, I spoke Japanese, Japanese and still do quite comfortably. I met a lot of foreigners who spoke Japanese very well. No one that I was aware of had ever heard of pitch accent. So probably it exists. Maybe it's something that some people want to spend time on, but it is not necessary.

It is not necessary. It's not a unnecessary part of learning the language, of communicating. It's certainly not necessary in so far as comprehension is concerned. Um, in Chinese, on the other hand, if you speak Chinese with very bad tones, people may have difficulty understanding you. And in any case, it sounds quite bad.

It sounds as if you don't speak the language very well, you would have to get those tones up to about 70, 80% accuracy to be taken seriously. In Japanese, that is not the case. I never pay any attention to pitch accent. I just consider, whatever it pitch accent is and I still don't understand it, it's part of imitating the way people speak.

Every language has its own intonation. Even within Japan, the intonation in the Kansai and the Osaka area is different from the intonation. In, um, you know, the Northeast and Tohoku area and the same is true for every language. I mean, if you've ever heard a French Canadian, the Quebecois speak French,

their intonation is very different from the intonation in Paris, which is different from the intonation in Southern France. Uh, if you've ever heard a Swiss person speak, even English very often, they'll have their Swiss intonation. And I can only imagine that their Hochdeutsch, their standard German also sounds

quite different from the intonation of a, of an Austrian or a Bavarian or someone from Hamburg. So the idea that there is intonation in a language, I mean, we have intonation in English. I remember when I, one of the reasons why I decided to learn Cantonese was that having learned Mandarin with its four tones and having all these Cantonese people scare you off saying

cantonese is the most difficult language because it has nine tones. And I said, geez, I mean, I had enough trouble learning four tones, nine tones is just too difficult, but I found this book written by a Chinese person, Cantonese speaker, who, first of all said, you only need six tones for Cantonese. And second of all, pointed out that we have tones in English and you can hear me hear me in my English.

I also have tones. So, is it worthwhile, you know, going into great detail, classifying? I mean, Persian is described or Turkish as a tonal language. I just listened to it and try to imitate it. Um, I think I do. Okay. I don't have enough vocabulary in those languages to speak them well, but it's not my lack of

emphasis on pitch accent that's holding me back. Uh, by the way, just to digress, so my wife and I head back home to Canada, uh, some trepidation about what's going to happen at the border because actually the government heavily discourages you from traveling outside the country. And if you fly into a major airport, you have to quarantine in a hotel that the government dictates and you pay for it.

While waiting for your first test results to come back could be two or three days. We didn't want to do that. So we flew from Palm Springs to Bellingham, which is 20 minutes from the border. The luggage took a while to come out. So it was getting later and later we had trouble getting an Uber. We couldn't get an Uber.

We finally got a Lyft driver to come to the airport. He drove us to the border. Now it's dark. It's close to 10 o'clock. We're dropped off at the Peace Arch Park. We don't know where to go. We wander around in the park. Finally found a sort of a sidewalk, followed it, got to a road. Walked for about a mile, pulling my luggage until we got to the border.

And there, there, there's a very serious looking sign there with a big stop sign stop until you are "motioned forward by an agent". Okay. I stop. So we waited and waited and waited cars every so often a car would come back and the customs official would come along. Customs official would deal with the car.

I thought, how are they ever going to pay attention to us? So finally they came and, um, basically I had registered on a government app or downloaded an app. So I had already sent them ahead all our information. So it went very, very smoothly. They knew who we were, uh, asked us a few questions and then told us that we would have to quarantine for 14 days.

And that the penalty for breaking quarantine could be as high as a million dollars or three years in jail. I don't think they'd ever do that, but that's kind of to scare you, right? And then they said, you're lucky because the self-testing tent hasn't closed yet. So go off to the tent there and the nurse, there will show you how to self test, because we're going to have to self test again in seven days.

So we went ahead, and there were two or three different nurses that couldn't have been kinder, more helpful, more pleasant. Took us through our paces, registered us on a website where we have to report. Then our second test, did the test in our nostrils. One 15 seconds in each nostril, put it in this little container, send it off.

We're going to have to do the same seven days later. Then we went out to find an Uber, uh, walked a ways and then call the Uber. Our Uber driver got lost. ENded up actually having, I think he went across into the United States. He then told us that the border guards had told him that, uh, you know, he had to prove that he was an Uber driver, so he wouldn't have to quarantine on his way back.

Anyway, he was an African immigrant. So I was able to speak some Farsi with him in the car. I have no idea what pitch accent he had and I think it makes no difference. Just a brief aside, I think that the only way we're getting through this, uh, COVID epidemic is through vaccines. Anybody who is not willing to get a vaccine is simply a part of the problem, not a part of the solution.

And the same was true with masking before we were vaccinated. That was the only way we could keep a lid on the pandemic. I just don't understand people who in the name of some kind of freedom, refuse to cooperate with everybody else in trying to basically help the whole of society get through this thing.

Anyway, that's, as an aside... I have the freedom to drive through a red light, it's the same idea. Anyway, getting back to pitch accent. So. I think all these languages probably have pitch accent. I think there is a great tendency, it's fine for linguists academic link with, to study different qualities of languages and categorize them.

And this is subject-verb-object, and this is subject-object-verb, and this belongs to this other group and it doesn't matter for the language learner. We simply have to imitate what we hear. We have to get used to the pattern of the language and, um, In my Swedish, there are tones in Swedish. I like to Imitate ...you imitate it.

Yeah, the same is true in Japanese. And if I spend a lot of time with people from Osaka, uh, I end up with more of an Osaka accent. Um, it doesn't affect the meaning. It's not like Chinese tones. But it's something that, uh, again, you know, you talk about tones that compare, uh, compare a Brazilian to someone from Portugal, different area, different people, even native speaker, they're going to have different types of intonation and you will naturally want to imitate the accent and the intonation.

That, that either you like the best, or that is more useful for you in your work or you consider more prestigious or whatever it might be. And I don't think, and the other thing about pitch accent, it is possible that if I put a lot of effort on pitch accent, so I decided, uh, I'm not going to be, I'm not going to allow myself to be influenced by having spent two evenings with people from Osaka, which inevitably makes me speak with more of an Osaka accent.

I'm going to try to, you know, nail down the, the sort of pitch accent of the Japanese national broadcast announcer NHK announcer. So I'm gonna go whole hog with the Dogan program. Uh, and, but the problem is that language is about communication. It's not a performance sport. No one, I I'm not, I don't care if people tell me, well, you're Japanese pronunciation is, sounds a bit this way or that way I don't care.

Uh, people are comfortable communicating with me. I'm comfortable because I understand what people are saying to me in Japanese. Um, I'm not seeking perfection. Uh, you know, it's, it's not a performance it's it's communication. And to that extent people who do want to achieve the NHK announcers, uh, intonation by all means, but to pretend that this is important, uh, it's not as important as increasing your vocabulary.

It's not as important as having a good command of the language and using words appropriately, using words that belong together, being able to express your thoughts. Clearly that's far more important than pursuing the ultimate, you know, in tones. I ha... I mentioned this before, I had a Swiss banker who came in with his sidekick from England, uh, to try and sell something to us.

The Swiss banker had a strong Swiss accent in his English. But he used words so well, he expressed himself so accurately, so elegantly and his English sidekick, maybe he wasn't that well educated, he didn't use the English language as well, but he spoke with a native accent. So if you want to pursue pitch accent by all means do so.

But in my opinion, it's not that important and I certainly pay no attention to it anyway. Uh, and I'm going to leave a couple of videos here to follow up on the subject of pronunciation and seeking to be perfect and so forth. So thank you for listening. Bye for now.

Pitch Accent: Is It Important? Výška přízvuku: Je důležitý? Tonhöhenakzent: Ist er wichtig? Pitch Accent: Is It Important? Acento de tono: ¿Es importante? Accentuation de la hauteur : Est-il important ? Accento del passo: È importante? ピッチのアクセント:それは重要か? 피치 악센트: 중요한가요? Akcent boiskowy: Czy jest ważny? Sotaque do pitch: É importante? Акцент на питче: Важно ли это? Perde Aksan: Önemli mi? Наголос: Чи важливо це? 音调口音:重要吗? 音調重音:重要嗎?

Hi, Steve Kaufmann here again, and today I'm going to talk about whether pitch accent is important in learning languages like Japanese. こんにちは、またまたスティーブ・カウフマンです。今日は、日本語などの言語を学ぶ上で、ピッチのアクセントは重要かどうかという話をします。 Olá, sou novamente Steve Kaufmann e hoje vou falar sobre a importância da pronúncia na aprendizagem de línguas como o japonês. 大家好,史蒂夫·考夫曼又来了,今天我要谈谈音调重音对于学习日语等语言是否重要。 Remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notifications. So, first of all, I'm back home. So, first of all, I'm back home. All right. Uh, I was in Palm Springs for six weeks.

I went there for a variety of reasons. First of all, our house needed, our house down there needed some work to be done on it. まず第一に、私たちの家は必要でした、そこにある私たちの家はそれに行われるためにいくつかの仕事を必要としました。 Trước hết, ngôi nhà của chúng tôi cần, ngôi nhà của chúng tôi ở dưới đó cần một số công việc phải hoàn thành. Uh, also, we were doing some work here, so it was very messy, drywall dust and so forth. Uh, también, estábamos haciendo algunos trabajos aquí, así que era muy sucio, polvo de yeso y así sucesivamente. So we went down there and we also got our second dose of the vaccine. And then Friday night we came back home and I'll go, I'll explain that a little bit later, but pitch accent.

So there's quite a debate about pitch accent, particularly in Japanese. だから、ピッチのアクセントについては、特に日本語ではかなり議論がある。 And I will post the link in the description box to a person who speaks flawless Japanese, like a Japanese person. そして、日本人のように完璧な日本語を話す人に、説明欄にリンクを貼る。 And he is a proponent of studying pitch accent. そして、彼はピッチのアクセントを研究する提唱者でもある。 His name is Dogan, and I will also show you a link to a video by another person whose name escapes me, who says that pitch accent is not worth worrying about. 彼の名前はドーガン。名前は忘れたが、ピッチのアクセントは気にする価値がないと言う別の人物のビデオへのリンクもお見せしよう。

And I will leave a third link to a description of pitch accent from Wikipedia. So pitch accent is, uh, and it doesn't just exist in Japanese. つまり、高低アクセントは、ええと、日本語だけに存在するわけではありません。 It's the idea that in languages we have varying intonation. 言語にはさまざまなイントネーションがあるという考えです。 All right. Intonation, that's not necessarily tied to the meaning of a word. イントネーション、それは必ずしも単語の意味に結びついているわけではありません。 So. So. In Chinese, if you say a Chinese word with the wrong tone, it's a different meaning altogether. In Chinese, if you say a Chinese word with the wrong tone, it's a different meaning altogether. 中国語では、間違った口調で中国語の単語を言うと、まったく別の意味になります。

And people can be confused or have difficulty understanding you if you use the wrong tones. І люди можуть заплутатися або не зрозуміти вас, якщо ви використовуєте неправильні інтонації. That is not the case in Japanese. 日本語ではそうではありません。 Other, uh, languages, which according to Wikipedia have this, uh, pitch accent include Swedish, Turkish, Persian, Western Basque. 他の、ええと、ウィキペディアによると、これを持っている言語、ええと、ピッチアクセントには、スウェーデン語、トルコ語、ペルシア語、西バスク語が含まれます。 Okay, just Western  Basque. Okay, just Western Basque. Uh, and I can't remember how... ancient Greek a number of languages that, um, according to them, Serbo-Croation have this pitch accent issue.

Now, let me say upfront that I lived in Japan for nine years, I spoke Japanese, Japanese and still do quite comfortably. Agora, deixem-me dizer desde já que vivi no Japão durante nove anos, falava japonês, japonês e ainda falo com bastante facilidade. I met a lot of foreigners who spoke Japanese very well. No one that I was aware of had ever heard of pitch accent. 私が知っている人は誰もピッチアクセントについて聞いたことがありませんでした。 So probably it exists. Maybe it's something that some people want to spend time on, but it is not necessary. 時間をかけたいという人もいるかもしれませんが、必須ではありません。

It is not necessary. It's not a unnecessary part of learning the language, of communicating. It's certainly not necessary in so far as comprehension is concerned. Für das Verständnis ist es sicherlich nicht notwendig. 理解に関する限り、それは確かに必要ではありません。 从理解的角度来说这当然没有必要。 Um, in Chinese, on the other hand, if you speak Chinese with very bad tones, people may have difficulty understanding you. And in any case, it sounds quite bad.

It sounds as if you don't speak the language very well, you would have to get those tones up to about 70, 80% accuracy to be taken seriously. It sounds as if you don't speak the language very well, you would have to get those tones up to about 70, 80% accuracy to be taken seriously. In Japanese, that is not the case. I never pay any attention to pitch accent. I never pay any attention to pitch accent. I just consider, whatever it pitch accent is and I still don't understand it, it's part of imitating the way people speak. I just consider, whatever it pitch accent is and I still don't understand it, it's part of imitating the way people speak.

Every language has its own intonation. Even within Japan, the intonation in the Kansai and the Osaka area is different from the intonation. In, um, you know, the Northeast and Tohoku area and the same is true for every language. I mean, if you've ever heard a French Canadian, the Quebecois speak French,

their intonation is very different from the intonation in Paris, which is different from the intonation in Southern France. Uh, if you've ever heard a Swiss person speak, even English very often, they'll have their Swiss intonation. And I can only imagine that their Hochdeutsch, their standard German also sounds

quite different from the intonation of a, of an Austrian or a Bavarian or someone from Hamburg. So the idea that there is intonation in a language, I mean, we have intonation in English. I remember when I, one of the reasons why I decided to learn Cantonese was that having learned Mandarin with its four tones and having all these Cantonese people scare you off saying

cantonese is the most difficult language because it has nine tones. And I said, geez, I mean, I had enough trouble learning four tones, nine tones is just too difficult, but I found this book written by a Chinese person, Cantonese speaker, who, first of all said, you only need six tones for Cantonese. And second of all, pointed out that we have tones in English and you can hear me hear me in my English.

I also have tones. So, is it worthwhile, you know, going into great detail, classifying? Então, vale a pena, sabe, entrar em grandes pormenores, classificar? I mean, Persian is described or Turkish as a tonal language. I just listened to it and try to imitate it. Um, I think I do. Okay. I don't have enough vocabulary in those languages to speak them well, but it's not my lack of

emphasis on pitch accent that's holding me back. Betonung des Tonhöhenakzents, der mich zurückhält. Uh, by the way, just to digress, so my wife and I head back home to Canada, uh, some trepidation about what's going to happen at the border because actually the government heavily discourages you from traveling outside the country. And if you fly into a major airport, you have to quarantine in a hotel that the government dictates and you pay for it.

While waiting for your first test results to come back could be two or three days. We didn't want to do that. So we flew from Palm Springs to Bellingham, which is 20 minutes from the border. The luggage took a while to come out. So it was getting later and later we had trouble getting an Uber. We couldn't get an Uber.

We finally got a Lyft driver to come to the airport. He drove us to the border. Now it's dark. It's close to 10 o'clock. We're dropped off at the Peace Arch Park. Deixam-nos no Parque do Arco da Paz. We don't know where to go. Não sabemos para onde ir. We wander around in the park. Andamos a passear pelo parque. Finally found a sort of a sidewalk, followed it, got to a road. Finalmente encontrei uma espécie de passeio, segui-o e cheguei a uma estrada. Walked for about a mile, pulling my luggage until we got to the border. Andei cerca de um quilómetro e meio a puxar a minha bagagem até chegarmos à fronteira.

And there, there, there's a very serious looking sign there with a big stop sign stop until you are "motioned forward by an agent". E ali, ali, ali está um sinal muito sério com um grande sinal de "stop" (pare) até ser "mandado avançar por um agente". Okay. I stop. So we waited and waited and waited cars every so often a car would come back and the customs official would come along. だから私たちは車を待って待って待っていたので、車が戻ってきて税関職員がやってくることがよくありました。 Assim, esperámos e esperámos e esperámos carros de vez em quando um carro voltava e o funcionário da alfândega aparecia. Customs official would deal with the car. 税関職員が車を扱うでしょう。 O funcionário da alfândega trataria do carro.

I thought, how are they ever going to pay attention to us? So finally they came and, um, basically I had registered on a government app or downloaded an app. So I had already sent them ahead all our information. So it went very, very smoothly. They knew who we were, uh, asked us a few questions and then told us that we would have to quarantine for 14 days.

And that the penalty for breaking quarantine could be as high as a million dollars or three years in jail. そして、検疫を破った場合の罰則は、100万ドルまたは3年の懲役に達する可能性があります。 I don't think they'd ever do that, but that's kind of to scare you, right? 彼らがそうすることはないと思いますが、それはあなたを怖がらせるようなものですよね? And then they said, you're lucky because the self-testing tent hasn't closed yet. そして彼らは、セルフテストテントがまだ閉まっていないのであなたは幸運だと言いました。 So go off to the tent there and the nurse, there will show you how to self test, because we're going to have to self test again in seven days. テントと看護師のところに行って、セルフテストの方法を説明します。7日後にもう一度セルフテストを行う必要があるからです。

So we went ahead, and there were two or three different nurses that couldn't have been kinder, more helpful, more pleasant. それで私たちは先に進みました、そして、より親切で、より親切で、より快適であることができなかった2つか3つの異なる看護師がいました。 Took us through our paces, registered us on a website where we have to report. Then our second test, did the test in our nostrils. One 15 seconds in each nostril, put it in this little container, send it off. Einmal 15 Sekunden in jedes Nasenloch, in diesen kleinen Behälter geben und wegschicken. 各鼻孔に15秒ずつ、この小さな容器に入れて送ります。

We're going to have to do the same seven days later. Then we went out to find an Uber, uh, walked a ways and then call the Uber. Our Uber driver got lost. Uberドライバーが迷子になりました。 ENded up actually having, I think he went across into the United States. 実際に持っていることに夢中になって、彼はアメリカに渡ったと思います。 He then told us that the border guards had told him that, uh, you know, he had to prove that he was an Uber driver, so he wouldn't have to quarantine on his way back. それから彼は、国境警備隊が彼に、ええと、あなたが知っているように、彼がユーバーの運転手であることを証明しなければならなかったので、帰りに検疫する必要がないだろうと言ったと私たちに話しました。

Anyway, he was an African immigrant. とにかく、彼はアフリカの移民でした。 So I was able to speak some Farsi with him in the car. I have no idea what pitch accent he had and I think it makes no difference. Just a brief aside, I think that the only way we're getting through this, uh, COVID epidemic is through vaccines. Nur kurz am Rande: Ich glaube, dass wir diese COVID-Epidemie nur durch Impfungen in den Griff bekommen. 簡単に言うと、私たちがこれを乗り越える唯一の方法は、ええと、COVIDの流行はワクチンによるものだと思います。 Anybody who is not willing to get a vaccine is simply a part of the problem, not a part of the solution. ワクチンを接種したくない人は、単に問題の一部であり、解決策の一部ではありません。

And the same was true with masking before we were vaccinated. そして、ワクチン接種前のマスキングについても同じことが言えました。 That was the only way we could keep a lid on the pandemic. それが私たちがパンデミックの蓋を保つことができる唯一の方法でした。 I just don't understand people who in the name of some kind of freedom, refuse to cooperate with everybody else in trying to basically help the whole of society get through this thing. ある種の自由の名の下に、基本的に社会全体がこのことを乗り越えるのを助けるために他の人と協力することを拒否する人々を私は理解していません。

Anyway, that's, as an aside... I have the freedom to drive through a red light, it's the same idea. とにかく、それはさておき、私には赤信号を通り抜ける自由があります、それは同じ考えです。 Anyway, getting back to pitch accent. So. I think all these languages probably have pitch accent. I think there is a great tendency, it's fine for linguists academic link with, to study different qualities of languages and categorize them. 言語学者が学問的なつながりを持ち、言語のさまざまな性質を研究して分類することは問題ないという大きな傾向があると思います。

And this is subject-verb-object, and this is subject-object-verb, and this belongs to this other group and it doesn't matter for the language learner. そして、これは主語-動詞-目的語であり、これは主語-目的語-動詞であり、これはこの他のグループに属し、言語学習者にとっては重要ではありません。 We simply have to imitate what we hear. 聞いたことを真似するだけです。 We have to get used to the pattern of the language and, um, In my Swedish, there are tones in Swedish. I like to Imitate ...you imitate it.

Yeah, the same is true in Japanese. And if I spend a lot of time with people from Osaka, uh, I end up with more of an Osaka accent. そして、大阪の人たちとたくさんの時間を過ごすと、大阪のアクセントになってしまいます。 Um, it doesn't affect the meaning. It's not like Chinese tones. But it's something that, uh, again, you know, you talk about tones that compare, uh, compare a Brazilian to someone from Portugal, different area, different people, even native speaker, they're going to have different types of intonation and you will naturally want to imitate the accent and the intonation.

That, that either you like the best, or that is more useful for you in your work or you consider more prestigious or whatever it might be. それは、あなたが一番好きであるか、それがあなたの仕事であなたにとってより有用であるか、あなたがより権威のあるものかそれが何であるかを考えるかのどちらかです。 Aquela de que mais gosta, ou que lhe é mais útil no seu trabalho, ou que considera mais prestigiante, ou o que quer que seja. And I don't think, and the other thing about pitch accent, it is possible that if I put a lot of effort on pitch accent, so I decided, uh, I'm not going to be, I'm not going to allow myself to be influenced by having spent two evenings with people from Osaka, which inevitably makes me speak with more of an Osaka accent. 高低アクセントについては、そうは思いませんが、高低アクセントに力を入れれば、そうなるとは思いませんでした。大阪の人と二晩過ごしたことに影響を受けて、必然的に大阪のアクセントで話すようになります。

I'm going to try to, you know, nail down the, the sort of pitch accent of the Japanese national broadcast announcer NHK announcer. Voy a tratar de, ya sabes, clavar el, el tipo de acento de tono de la emisión nacional japonesa NHK locutor. 日本の全国放送アナウンサーNHKアナウンサーの高低アクセントのようなものを釘付けにしようと思います。 So I'm gonna go whole hog with the Dogan program. Por isso, vou apostar tudo no programa Dogan. Uh, and, but the problem is that language is about communication. ええと、しかし問題は言語がコミュニケーションについてであるということです。 It's not a performance sport. パフォーマンススポーツではありません。 No one, I I'm not, I don't care if people tell me, well, you're Japanese pronunciation is, sounds a bit this way or that way I don't care. Niemand, ich bin nicht, es ist mir egal, wenn man mir sagt, na ja, deine japanische Aussprache ist, klingt ein bisschen so oder so, es ist mir egal. 誰も、私はそうではありません、人々が私に言ってもかまいません、まあ、あなたは日本語の発音です、少しこのように聞こえるか、私は気にしません。

Uh, people are comfortable communicating with me. ええと、人々は私と快適にコミュニケーションをとっています。 I'm comfortable because I understand what people are saying to me in Japanese. Um, I'm not seeking perfection. ええと、私は完璧を求めていません。 Uh, you know, it's, it's not a performance it's it's communication. And to that extent people who do want to achieve the NHK announcers, uh, intonation by all means, but to pretend that this is important, uh, it's not as important as increasing your vocabulary. そして、その程度まで、NHKアナウンサーを達成したい人は、どうしてもイントネーションを達成したいのですが、これが重要であると偽って、語彙を増やすほど重要ではありません。

It's not as important as having a good command of the language and using words appropriately, using words that belong together, being able to express your thoughts. 言語を上手に使いこなし、言葉を適切に使い、一緒に属する言葉を使い、自分の考えを表現できることほど重要ではありません。 Nie jest to tak ważne, jak dobra znajomość języka i używanie słów we właściwy sposób, używanie słów, które do siebie pasują, umiejętność wyrażania swoich myśli. 这并不像掌握良好的语言、恰当地使用词语、使用合适的词语、能够表达你的想法那么重要。 Clearly that's far more important than pursuing the ultimate, you know, in tones. 明らかに、それは究極のトーンを追求するよりもはるかに重要です。 I ha... I mentioned this before, I had a Swiss banker who came in with his sidekick from England, uh, to try and sell something to us.

The Swiss banker had a strong Swiss accent in his English. But he used words so well, he expressed himself so accurately, so elegantly and his English sidekick, maybe he wasn't that well educated, he didn't use the English language as well, but he spoke with a native accent. しかし、彼は言葉をとても上手に使い、自分自身をとても正確に、とてもエレガントに、そして彼の英語の相棒を表現しました。 So if you want to pursue pitch accent by all means do so.

But in my opinion, it's not that important and I certainly pay no attention to it anyway. しかし、私の意見では、それはそれほど重要ではなく、とにかく私は確かにそれに注意を払っていません。 Uh, and I'm going to leave a couple of videos here to follow up on the subject of pronunciation and seeking to be perfect and so forth. ええと、発音のテーマをフォローアップしたり、完璧を目指したりするために、ここにいくつかのビデオを残しておきます。 So thank you for listening. Bye for now.