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Steve's Youtube Videos - General Language Learning, My Language Learning Motivation

My Language Learning Motivation

History to me is not necessarily about remembering the dates.

It's more about experiencing that history while I'm learning the language. Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here again, uh, talking about languages of course, and today I'm going to talk about languages and history. Uh, remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notifications.

If you follow me on Spotify or at least any other, um, podcast service, please leave a review. Why history? Why do I want to talk about history? Because history fascinates me. And I think, you know, I realize that people watch my videos either because they're working on improving their English or because they find them, you know, my videos, in some way motivating and encouraging and therefore encourages them to continue with learning languages, which in turn motivates me to make more videos. And so I was thinking the other day, you know, what motivates me to learn languages? So it started with a professor, as I've said before, that I had at McGill university, because we had French at school, I wasn't very interested.

Uh, there were, you know, in a city of 3 million people in those days in Montreal, and there were 2 million French speakers and 1 million English speakers. I could have gone out and found people to talk to if I wanted to, uh, I wasn't very motivated until this professer, we had this course, French civilization, and we had this tremendous book and, you know, between, uh, you know, Moliere and... Voltaire and, and reading all these, uh, bits and pieces of what, some of the thinkers among thing and others, or even seeing, uh, you know, the famous painters like David and Watteau and all of this it for whatever reason it turned my crank and maybe it was the professor. But it was largely a matter of history. I suddenly became conscious of this, this French civilization, which like all civilizations went back in history, but I became interested specifically in French civilization. Not that it is any more fascinating or more valuable than any other civilization, but it has its charm.

Its works of art. Its, its architecture, its literature, its history. And I can still remember when I first arrived in Paris, when I had hitchhiked across the ocean on a, on a small German tramp steamer and hitchhiked into Paris. And I saw the Arc de Triomphe and I said, I was just beside myself because this is this history that I had become so, uh, you know, interested in. Um, and so that was... and then I went to France and I studied for three years and then the next language was Chinses. And I can remember when I got into Chinese, what fascinated me again was history. Uh, I remember, of course, when we first start out, we have to read things that are relatively uninteresting, and I've mentioned that we have to deal with relatively uninteresting content

uh, with a lot of repetition, but once we're able to start climbing our way out of that, and we go after things of interest, to me it's history that I go after. And so with Chinese, it struck me as so romantic. The idea that this ancient civilization of China had all of a sudden come into contact with the West, with different ways of thinking, with science, with different political systems and how did they cope with that?

And so for me, some of the literature and the history of the sort of first half of the 20th century in China was, was absolutely fascinating. And I devoured material on that subject, unfortunately, in Chinese to read about ancient history very often is more in sort of literary Chinese and there is just a limitless, limitless number of names to remember.

And I found that while, you know, it was fascinating to conjure up the Tang dynasty and how they lived and so forth or other dynasties, the Han and the Shang, but the portion of history that fascinated me wasthe early part of the 20th century. So that was Chinese. When I came to Japan, I've mentioned before I listened over and over to the history of the Showa Era, which was produced by NHK, which had the real voices of the real people in radio programs and elsewhere or radio announcers describing events during the Showa Era, which began...and again, I forget, you know, I love history, but I forget it as fast as I learn it but it was some time in the twenties up until the second world war. And then after the second world war, um, yeah, the Showa Era... I can't remember. It doesn't matter. History to me is not necessarily about remembering the dates.

It's more about experiencing that history while I'm learning the language. So through the language, I'm getting a flavor of the country, which then influences my perspective on the country. So that was true of, uh, of Japanese. And I can recollect, recollect listening to history, history of Poland. As soon as I got through the mini stories I found on, uh, publio.pl I think it is, um, a book where I could get both the audio book and the ebook.

And so I could read it on LingQ and I could listen to it. History of Poland, history of Ukraine, history of Russia, uh, even certain novels, like every Italian person I've ever met say tells me that they find I promessi sposi by Mazzoni very boring cause they have to read it in school. But for me it conjures up 17th century, I believe it is, uh, you know, Northern Italy. And so again, it's history and to me, it's... I, I remember jogging, uh, listening to it, I promessi sposi, and I listened to a lot of it. Wonderful rendition by, uh , il narratore which is a great site for people who are learning Italian. I mean every language, when I was looking... and Greek the same way. I found a podcast where they talked about how the, the, uh, Parthenon was built stone by stone.

And that was very difficult for me because I didn't have the words, but at least it was interesting. And so I, and, and even now, you know, it's, it's so fascinating. Like, I, I stopped listening to, or at least learning Korean because there was a lack of content at my level, but, sort of interesting... there was interesting content it was too difficult.

Htere was content that I could understand that was uninteresting. Uh, but lo and behold, my wife has started watching these historical dramas, Korean historical dramas. And so that just gets me keen again. So there's this one called the, The Crowned Clown, which is like most of these historical dramas, not very believable, but still fascinating.

And of course it presents the costumes and, and in that it's, it's, it's that period where the Manchus who are described there as being the late Jin, because the Jin dynasty invaded the Song, China, a Chinese dynasty back in the, I guess the 12th century. And this is the same Manchu people. Uh, and they're once again, go invade China and they invade Korea and they then become, they start calling themselves the Manchu and they call themselves the Qing Dynasty.

But the interesting thing there, again, So I look up on Wikipedia and you see pictures of the sort of, uh, Ningjiasu or Ningjiasu however he's pronounced, who is the leader of the Jin, later Jin and eventually, uh, which are known in English as Jurchen or, uh, anyway, so he dresses like it's all Chinese, culturally Chinese, and yet the sort of scrolls behind him are written in this vertical script.

Then when I look it up, it's the Mongol Manchu script, which is an adaptation of the Uyghur script, which is in turn an adaptation of the Sogdian script. The Sogdians are, are an Iranian speaking people who controlled the silk road. Uh, and that in turn has its origins in the Middle East, uh, you know, Aramaic or I don't know, Syriac or Phoenicia, and there's that it's all connected.

And once you begin, once you start to realize, after a while is all history is connected. So we tend to, you know, the major countries in the world, they did all the history plus our own country. But of course, you know, the Manchus had their history, the Mongol's have their history. Uh, they connect through Central Asia to Central Asia, which a thousand years ago was a major center of, of world cultures.

Uh, connecting the Arab world with the Indian world, with the Persian world, with the Chinese world, uh, Persians had a major influence as did Arabs in the Tang dynasty. There were many Persian and Arab traders and, and literary people and artists in, uh, I guess it was... I can't remember. So all of this stuff is connected.

So when I learn Persian now, of course I, um, I'm just loving because a lot of the historical stuff is too difficult, but again, uh, Sahra has created these 26 episodes of Iranian history in easier language for me. And so I listen to that and read that. And, and that course, you know, stimulates me to go off and read about the history of Persia elsewhere.

So I just want to pass that along. I mean, I could go on, I'm trying to think of other... like Ukrainian, again, to understand Ukraine, you have to read Ukrainian history and you have to read Ukrainian history written by Ukrainians. So if you're going to do that, then may as well read it in Ukrainian and may as well listen to the audio book in Ukrainian, which I have done. And so that gives you a perspective on Ukraine, which is different from a perspective on Ukrainian history written by someone from Poland because they dominated Ukraine for hundreds of years, or written by someone from Russia. Russia also dominated portions of Ukraine for many years.

And so when you get the history of the people spoken by the people in their language and you can access it and their history and their culture and their various, uh, cultural creations throughout their history, that motivates me to learn a language. It's not simply the fact that I might be able to speak to someone.

Of course, I want to speak to someone, but the motivation for me in these languages is largely history and, uh, watching that Netflix video the other day has gotten me motivated again to go and brush up my Korean. We'll see what happens. All these competing, uh, you know, attractive languages to learn.

Anyway, I just wanted to share that with you. Uh, thank you for listening and remember to get a, to, to, to achieve your goals and language learning, you have to be motivated. You have to find things that motivate you. Uh, and you have to read and listen on those subjects of interest and I'll leave a few videos that relate to that.

Thanks for listening. Bye for now.



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My Language Learning Motivation

History to me is not necessarily about remembering the dates. Bana göre tarih, tarihleri hatırlamakla ilgili değildir.

It's more about experiencing that history while I'm learning the language. Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here again, uh, talking about languages of course, and today I'm going to talk about languages and history. Uh, remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notifications.

If you follow me on Spotify or at least any other, um, podcast service, please leave a review. Why history? Why do I want to talk about history? Because history fascinates me. And I think, you know, I realize that people watch my videos either because they're working on improving their English or because they find them, you know, my videos, in some way motivating and encouraging and therefore encourages them to continue with learning languages, which in turn motivates me to make more videos. And so I was thinking the other day, you know, what motivates me to learn languages? So it started with a professor, as I've said before, that I had at McGill university, because we had French at school, I wasn't very interested.

Uh, there were, you know, in a city of 3 million people in those days in Montreal, and there were 2 million French speakers and 1 million English speakers. I could have gone out and found people to talk to if I wanted to, uh, I wasn't very motivated until this professer, we had this course, French civilization, and we had this tremendous book and, you know, between, uh, you know, Moliere and... Voltaire and, and reading all these, uh, bits and pieces of what, some of the thinkers among thing and others, or even seeing, uh, you know, the famous painters like David and Watteau and all of this it for whatever reason it turned my crank and maybe it was the professor. But it was largely a matter of history. I suddenly became conscious of this, this French civilization, which like all civilizations went back in history, but I became interested specifically in French civilization. Not that it is any more fascinating or more valuable than any other civilization, but it has its charm. 他のどの文明よりも魅力的で価値があるというわけではありませんが、魅力があります。

Its works of art. その芸術作品。 Its, its architecture, its literature, its history. And I can still remember when I first arrived in Paris, when I had hitchhiked across the ocean on a, on a small German tramp steamer and hitchhiked into Paris. そして、私が最初にパリに到着したとき、小さなドイツの不定期貨物船で海を横切ってヒッチハイクし、パリにヒッチハイクしたときのことを今でも覚えています。 And I saw the Arc de Triomphe and I said, I was just beside myself because this is this history that I had become so, uh, you know, interested in. En ik zag de Arc de Triomphe en ik zei, ik was gewoon buiten mezelf omdat dit de geschiedenis is waar ik zo, je weet wel, in geïnteresseerd was geworden. Um, and so that was... and then I went to France and I studied for three years and then the next language was Chinses. And I can remember when I got into Chinese, what fascinated me again was history. Uh, I remember, of course, when we first start out, we have to read things that are relatively uninteresting, and I've mentioned that we have to deal with relatively uninteresting content

uh, with a lot of repetition, but once we're able to start climbing our way out of that, and we go after things of interest, to me it's history that I go after. And so with Chinese, it struck me as so romantic. The idea that this ancient civilization of China had all of a sudden come into contact with the West, with different ways of thinking, with science, with different political systems and how did they cope with that? この古代中国の文明が突然、さまざまな考え方、科学、さまざまな政治システムで西洋と接触したという考えと、彼らはそれにどのように対処したのでしょうか。

And so for me, some of the literature and the history of the sort of first half of the 20th century in China was, was absolutely fascinating. そして私にとって、中国における20世紀前半のような文学や歴史のいくつかは、絶対に魅力的でした。 And I devoured material on that subject, unfortunately, in Chinese to read about ancient history very often is more in sort of literary Chinese and there is just a limitless, limitless number of names to remember. そして、残念ながら、私はその主題に関する資料を中国語でむさぼり食い、古代の歴史について読むことは、より多くの場合、漢文のようなものであり、覚えておくべき名前の数は無限です。

And I found that while, you know, it was fascinating to conjure up the Tang dynasty and how they lived and so forth or other dynasties, the Han and the Shang, but the portion of history that fascinated me wasthe early part of the 20th century. So that was Chinese. When I came to Japan, I've mentioned before I listened over and over to the history of the Showa Era, which was produced by NHK, which had the real voices of the real people in radio programs and elsewhere or radio announcers describing events during the Showa Era, which began...and again, I forget, you know, I love history, but I forget it as fast as I learn it but it was some time in the twenties up until the second world war. And then after the second world war, um, yeah, the Showa Era... I can't remember. It doesn't matter. History to me is not necessarily about remembering the dates.

It's more about experiencing that history while I'm learning the language. So through the language, I'm getting a flavor of the country, which then influences my perspective on the country. So that was true of, uh, of Japanese. And I can recollect, recollect listening to history, history of Poland. そして、私はポーランドの歴史、歴史を聞いて思い出すことができます。 As soon as I got through the mini stories I found on, uh, publio.pl I think it is, um, a book where I could get both the audio book and the ebook.

And so I could read it on LingQ and I could listen to it. History of Poland, history of Ukraine, history of Russia, uh, even certain novels, like every Italian person I've ever met say tells me that they find I promessi sposi by Mazzoni very boring cause they have to read it in school. ポーランドの歴史、ウクライナの歴史、ロシアの歴史、ええと、私が今まで出会ったすべてのイタリア人のように、特定の小説でさえ、学校でそれを読まなければならないので、マッツォーニによる私が非常に退屈だと思うと私に言います。 But for me it conjures up 17th century, I believe it is, uh, you know, Northern Italy. And so again, it's history and to me, it's... I, I remember jogging, uh, listening to it, I promessi sposi, and I listened to a lot of it. Wonderful rendition by, uh , il narratore which is a great site for people who are learning Italian. I mean every language, when I was looking... and Greek the same way. I found a podcast where they talked about how the, the, uh, Parthenon was built stone by stone.

And that was very difficult for me because I didn't have the words, but at least it was interesting. And so I, and, and even now, you know, it's, it's so fascinating. Like, I, I stopped listening to, or at least learning Korean because there was a lack of content at my level, but, sort of interesting... there was interesting content it was too difficult. 自分のレベルのコンテンツが不足していたので、私は韓国語を聞くのをやめました。少なくとも韓国語を学ぶのはやめましたが、ちょっと面白いです...難しいコンテンツがありました。

Htere was content that I could understand that was uninteresting. Htereは面白くないと私が理解できる内容でした。 Uh, but lo and behold, my wife has started watching these historical dramas, Korean historical dramas. And so that just gets me keen again. そして、それは私を再び熱心にさせます。 So there's this one called the, The Crowned Clown, which is like most of these historical dramas, not very believable, but still fascinating.

And of course it presents the costumes and, and in that it's, it's, it's that period where the Manchus who are described there as being the late Jin, because the Jin dynasty invaded the Song, China, a Chinese dynasty back in the, I guess the 12th century. And this is the same Manchu people. Uh, and they're once again, go invade China and they invade Korea and they then become, they start calling themselves the Manchu and they call themselves the Qing Dynasty.

But the interesting thing there, again, So I look up on Wikipedia and you see pictures of the sort of, uh, Ningjiasu or Ningjiasu however he's pronounced, who is the leader of the Jin, later Jin and eventually, uh, which are known in English as Jurchen or, uh, anyway, so he dresses like it's all Chinese, culturally Chinese, and yet the sort of scrolls behind him are written in this vertical script. でも面白いのは、ウィキペディアを調べてみると、ニンジアスやニンジアスのような写真がありますが、彼は発音されています。彼は、ジン、後にジン、そして最終的には、知られているジンのリーダーです。とにかく、女真のように英語で、または、とにかく、彼はそれがすべて中国語で、文化的に中国語であるように服を着ます、それでも彼の後ろの種類の巻物はこの垂直のスクリプトで書かれています。

Then when I look it up, it's the Mongol Manchu script, which is an adaptation of the Uyghur script, which is in turn an adaptation of the Sogdian script. Als ik het dan opzoek, is het het Mongoolse Manchu-schrift, dat een bewerking is van het Oeigoerse schrift, dat op zijn beurt een bewerking is van het Sogdische schrift. The Sogdians are, are an Iranian speaking people who controlled the silk road. De Sogdians zijn een Iraans sprekend volk dat de zijderoute beheerste. Uh, and that in turn has its origins in the Middle East, uh, you know, Aramaic or I don't know, Syriac or Phoenicia, and there's that it's all connected.

And once you begin, once you start to realize, after a while is all history is connected. So we tend to, you know, the major countries in the world, they did all the history plus our own country. ですから、私たちは世界の主要国に、すべての歴史と私たちの国を加えた傾向があります。 But of course, you know, the Manchus had their history, the Mongol's have their history. Maar natuurlijk, weet je, de Manchus hadden hun geschiedenis, de Mongolen hun geschiedenis. Uh, they connect through Central Asia to Central Asia, which a thousand years ago was a major center of, of world cultures. ええと、彼らは中央アジアを経由して、千年前に世界文化の主要な中心地であった中央アジアに接続しています。

Uh, connecting the Arab world with the Indian world, with the Persian world, with the Chinese world, uh, Persians had a major influence as did Arabs in the Tang dynasty. ええと、アラブ世界とインドの世界、ペルシャの世界、中国の世界をつなぐ、ええと、唐王朝のアラブ人と同じように、ペルシャ人は大きな影響力を持っていました。 There were many Persian and Arab traders and, and literary people and artists in, uh, I guess it was... I can't remember. ペルシャ人やアラブ人の商人がたくさんいて、文学者や芸術家がいたのではないでしょうか…思い出せません。 So all of this stuff is connected. したがって、これらすべてのものが接続されています。

So when I learn Persian now, of course I, um, I'm just loving because a lot of the historical stuff is too difficult, but again, uh, Sahra has created these 26 episodes of Iranian history in easier language for me. ですから、私が今ペルシア語を学ぶとき、もちろん私は、歴史的なものの多くが難しすぎるので大好きですが、繰り返しになりますが、サーラは私にとってイランの歴史のこれらの26のエピソードをより簡単な言語で作成しました。 And so I listen to that and read that. だから私はそれを聞いてそれを読みます。 And, and that course, you know, stimulates me to go off and read about the history of Persia elsewhere. そして、そしてそのコースは、あなたが知っているように、私が立ち去って他の場所でペルシャの歴史について読むように刺激します。

So I just want to pass that along. だから私はそれを伝えたいだけです。 I mean, I could go on, I'm trying to think of other... like Ukrainian, again, to understand Ukraine, you have to read Ukrainian history and you have to read Ukrainian history written by Ukrainians. つまり、私は続けることができます、私は他のことを考えようとしています...ウクライナ人のように、再び、ウクライナを理解するには、ウクライナの歴史を読む必要があり、ウクライナ人によって書かれたウクライナの歴史を読む必要があります。 So if you're going to do that, then may as well read it in Ukrainian and may as well listen to the audio book in Ukrainian, which I have done. ですから、もしあなたがそれをするつもりなら、それをウクライナ語で読んだり、私がやったウクライナ語のオーディオブックを聴いたりするのもよいでしょう。 And so that gives you a perspective on Ukraine, which is different from a perspective on Ukrainian history written by someone from Poland because they dominated Ukraine for hundreds of years, or written by someone from Russia. そして、それはあなたにウクライナの見方を与えます。それは、彼らが何百年もの間ウクライナを支配したか、ロシアの誰かによって書かれたので、ポーランドの誰かによって書かれたウクライナの歴史の見方とは異なります。 Russia also dominated portions of Ukraine for many years.

And so when you get the history of the people spoken by the people in their language and you can access it and their history and their culture and their various, uh, cultural creations throughout their history, that motivates me to learn a language. ですから、人々が彼らの言語で話した人々の歴史を手に入れ、それと彼らの歴史と彼らの文化、そして彼らの歴史を通して彼らの様々な、ええと、文化的創造物にアクセスできるとき、それは私が言語を学ぶ動機になります。 It's not simply the fact that I might be able to speak to someone. それは私が誰かと話すことができるかもしれないという事実だけではありません。

Of course, I want to speak to someone, but the motivation for me in these languages is largely history and, uh, watching that Netflix video the other day has gotten me motivated again to go and brush up my Korean. もちろん、誰かと話したいのですが、これらの言語での私の動機は主に歴史であり、ええと、先日そのNetflixビデオを見ると、韓国語をブラッシュアップするために再び動機付けられました。 We'll see what happens. 何が起こるか見ていきます。 All these competing, uh, you know, attractive languages to learn.

Anyway, I just wanted to share that with you. Uh, thank you for listening and remember to get a, to, to, to achieve your goals and language learning, you have to be motivated. You have to find things that motivate you. あなたはあなたをやる気にさせるものを見つけなければなりません。 Uh, and you have to read and listen on those subjects of interest and I'll leave a few videos that relate to that.

Thanks for listening. Bye for now.

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