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Steve's Youtube Videos - General Language Learning, Learning Japanese & Doing Business in Japan

Learning Japanese & Doing Business in Japan

Steve: Today I have Steve from Steve's Point of View, and that's not my point of view, it's Steve who has a channel which he beams to Japan from the United States and talks about all kinds of things, including cars, but he is fluent in Japanese. And I would like to find out from Steve, and you can begin then by introducing yourself, like, what is it that you do right now?

How did you learn Japanese? And how did you manage to turn your knowledge of Japanese into an activity that is a viable business.

Steve POV: Hajimemashite Steve-san.

Steve: Hajimemashite, yoroshiku onegaishimasu.

Steve POV: Uh, thanks, uh, for having me on your channel. It's an honor. I appreciate you having me. My name is Steve. Um, I have a channel called Steve's Point of View or Steve's POV for short. I am fluent in Japanese. Um, uh, but I didn't start off my life that way. I started studying Japanese, I really wasn't interested in Japan until I got to college in 1988 at the university of Wisconsin.

I was a business major there studying business. And at the time Japan's economy was booming. Uh, there were books being written about Japan becoming the number one economy in the world. It was fascinating for sure. Uh, and as a business major, I, I, my goal was to make money and to try to be successful in business.

And I thought by combining, uh, Japanese language with my business degree, it would be a way for me to achieve, uh, success, uh, working together with Japan. And, uh, that was my stepping stone and I got to Japan in the summer, uh, back in 1991. I spent three months on a chicken farm in rural Japan, immersing myself into the culture, avoided speaking English for three months and came back to America with a, uh, a strong, uh, confidence, I guess that I can learn this language. I can master the language, the culture as well. I can get the, learn it very well and, uh, be successful that way. And I won a contest in 1993 called the Japanese Speech Language Contest. It's a national contest held in Chicago and that, that got me, uh, back to Japan and got me my first job opportunity there in Japan in 1995.

Steve: Interrupt you for just a second, because you said something that's so important. You came back confident that you could learn the language. I think that's an absolute key, that, that sense that I can do this thing anyway. Sorry to interrupt. But I just thought, I thought that was such an important thing.

Steve POV: It's a fantastic point, Steve. I wasn't confident until I went to Japan, I was not confident. I was one of the kids in the class who didn't have any experience with, with cultural exchanges or, or homestays or anything like that. A lot of kids in the class did. I didn't. I felt that I, I wasn't very good until I got to Japan and spent that three months.

And really that was the confidence. I came back with that confidence that I could learn this language. I could speak it. I could pronounce it. I can, I could, I could do well with it. And then, you know, there's another point of language you maybe understand that they say at some point, when you're learning a language, you start to dream in the language.

You start to, you start to speak the language in your dreams. And that, after that point is when I started actually having dreams in Japanese and somebody told me at that point, that's when you know you, I just mastered or to some degree, you know, you've got the language. And, uh, that day came and, uh, and from there I got back to Japan, started working, uh, worked, uh, for a Japanese company for about a year and a half or so before I ventured off on my own.

And I started, uh, doing, uh, translating and importing and exporting and all kinds of stuff in Japan as a foreigner, uh, back in the early nineties, uh, long way through there, back to the United States and California to now, to Texas. But I started YouTube about seven years ago. Uh, the passion of doing so was to show people, uh, there is a Japanese speaking, um, non-Japanese person here in north America who, uh, understands business and would love to work together and, and venture with people.

And that was the purpose of starting steve's POV. And, uh, thankfully here, about seven years later, almost 400,000 subscribers strong. Uh, the channel is, um, something that's fun to do along with my real estate business as well here in Texas.

Steve: So you have a real estate business in Texas, and then you have this, this YouTube channel, and I know you're very interested in cars, but, uh, do you just talk about cars, uh, or does your point of view include, you know, Steve, uh, you know, ranting on, like I do on a variety of different subjects in Japanese, uh, that your Japanese audience finds interesting, or is it mostly cars?

Steve POV: Well, Um, lately it's been mostly cars, but the channel started with something from my POV, the point of view that I had in living and working in Japan, living and experiencing Japanese culture and being an American.

And then coming back to the American, America and with a fresh Japanese work mindset, that way of doing things and coming back to America and experiencing a bit of culture shock, but even as an American back in from Japan. And I started making videos where I played a Japanese salary man and a Japanese salesman in the same kind of short parad... parody type setting. And it shows kind of those big differences between Japan and America.

Steve: Sorry, did you say a Japanese salary man and a Japanese salesman?

Steve POV: American salesman.

Steve: American Salesman.

Steve POV: American salesman versus Japanese salesman.

Steve: Okay, sorry.

Steve POV: No problem. Sorry. I might've missed that. Um, so, and you know, they're very different Japanese, you know, the necktie's on you're very, you know, you're suited up.

You're, you're very stiff. You're very rigid. You're very manual in many ways, there's way to do things. And there's only one way to do things and yeah. And then Americans were a little more laid back, but you know, my feet are up on the desk guys. T-shirts on Fridays and we're out of the office at 2.30, we got a baseball game for the kids, you know, it's, uh, it, these are things in Japan you didn't have. I found those differences very interesting. And I put some videos out about them that did very well.

Steve: You know, one of the big differences in my experience is in Japan, if you are dealing with someone in business, then you say, can you do this? And they said, "Hmm, do desho", very difficult. That means he's going to do it. Uh, in the north America.

If you say, can you do this? Oh yeah, no problem. Uh, maybe, and maybe not.

Steve POV: Maybe, maybe not. And everything's the best here. You know, we talk about us a lot.

Steve: Oh the best.

Steve POV: And it's mine. That's very personalized. You could be working for a company here, but you talking about my warehouse, my products, my guy in the warehouse, my guy in the back, you know, it's very personalized.

You're in Japan. It's about the group. It's about the company. It's about the bigger, uh, entity.

Steve: Plus in Japan, they don't necessarily, because you say my product is the best, that, they don't necessarily believe that, you know, just because you say yours is the best, you may not be convincing anyone and maybe you want to try to persuade them that you're going to try hard to, you know, look after your customer, rather than just saying mine is the best.

Steve POV: There's a bit more of a humble approach, I think, to, uh, to what you have there.

Steve: Yep, definitely.

Steve POV: It's not that hard, maybe sales push, or maybe as hard of a, you know, there's the best you've got to try the better, it's more of a humble approach. And you know, that's all built into the culture too. So when you learn Japanese language, right, Steve, it's not just learning "nani nani desu", "nani nani masu" you know, you know, the basic Japanese words, but it's, it's learning that culture.

And then the hierarchal Japanese society and how you humble yourself or elevate others, and how you talk to somebody older than yourself, or a teacher or a Shōchō, a president in a, in a company versus the guy who works below you in the company. It's very different. It's a different mindset that you need to understand.

Steve: But, but, uh, one thing I would say about that is that first of all, because Japan has had a different history and is from a very different culture, it doesn't mean that a North American can't learn that just as a Japanese person can learn the North American way. And so I definitely feel that, I mean, I can go over there and feel I'm integrated in with them.

I mean, they look at me, I look a little different, but culturally, in terms of what we're saying to each other, we're all operating kind of in the same cultural environment. Uh, that was one point. And I think another important point is you can't read a book which tells you how you should behave. And when you use the polite form and then expect to apply that you actually have to live it until you start to feel it naturally.

Steve POV: Exactly true. And that's part of going there and, you know, there's a lot of foreigners that were in Japan, uh, now, you know, and over the years, more and more have increased and you see a lot of foreigners stay together with other foreigners that there's, you know, there are people who are with Japanese, of course, but if you really want to learn, you've got to go out with Japanese in different social situations, whether it's eating, whether it's drinking, whether it's studying together or whatever, it may be working together and to understand those non-language, the non-language language, and the gestures. And, but some of the differences, differences that are there that unless you experience it, like you said, you can't just learn it in, in a, in a book necessarily.

Steve: No, no. And I think it's important to then want to be part of that group. And the same applies in reverse. If a Japanese person comes to North America, you have to want, or anybody learning any language, you have to want to be part of that group. And, and it's it's, if you're very self-conscious of yourself, here I am, I'm an American or a Canadian I'm in amongst all these Japanese. And, and somehow the fact that I'm this American speaking Japanese is somehow important.

All of that is negative. You're just there, one of them, part of the group, uh, that's been my experience that leads to acquiring the language and feeling part of a group.

Steve POV: If you go there and you act like, you know, Hey, well, I'm an American, I do things differently and all that. So you're, you're gonna, you're going to fail.

I, I, in my opinion, in, in, um, in really understanding and appreciating and learning Japanese culture and the beauty of it. I think you need to go overe there as if somebody comes here, it's not, you know, you have your culture, you have your identity. That's great. But you know, you're in their country. You're a guest in that country.

There are certain rules and certain formal things that are done. And believe me, if you don't follow those, you'll see maybe some people say, well, he's American, you know, or he's a foreigner. So, you know, we'll give him a pass on it. But if you're there and really trying to assimilate and you're doing stupid stuff, you're going to get called out on it.

Steve: But I think though it's important not to over sort of dramatize this. Like sometimes you'll get Americans going over there, they're bowing 90 degrees. You know, you have to feel it. You have to have, you know, sensitive tenticles, antenna that, that you start to feel it naturally. And so it's comfortable doing it.

You don't want to be doing something that's uncomfortable. I mean, of course you'd take your shoes off before you walk in a house. But other than that, I don't think people need to be so uptight. If they just naturally connect with people, person to person, they'll gradually start to see how other people behave and start behaving the same way.

Just as we acquire language through imitation, we acquire that, that cultural communication skill through just letting it come. You know?

Steve POV: I agree with you.

Steve: Yeah. Tell me...

Steve POV: Please go ahead with your question but I agree with your point.

Steve: No I was going to say, what is it now? What is the appeal to your viewer base, 400,000 subscribers, that's a lot. Uh, what is it you think that they find appealing in your videos?

Steve POV: I think they, they find appealing a couple of things. One, the fact that I'm located in the United States, I'm, I'm not Japanese, but I'm doing my, provide my shows in Japanese. That I've raised a son here in the United States who was born in California,

now in Texas is 21 years old who speaks Japanese fluently. He's comfortable doing it and he's not, um, um, ashamed or embarrassed in any way. I think there's something unique and completely different about that. Um, I also try to point out in my videos, even if they're about cars, the cultural differences, whether it be how a box is packed, that came from Japan and how it's wrapped and presented versus something that showed up from just down the street that looks like it just went through, you know, all around the world and under the ocean and everywhere else and back.

You know, these, these things, I try, I think people maybe find that point of view interesting, um, a father, son relationship as well. Certainly part of it as well.

Steve: Okay. Yeah. No, the Japanese attention to detail. If they're going to do something, they're going to do it 110 percent. Whereas they're in north America, 65% is good.

Steve POV: Maybe

Steve: Sometimes. We shouldn't be...yeah. Okay. Well, uh, we're going to have a chat on your channel in Japanese, and I'm certainly going to leave a link to your channel in my description box. So we can continue this conversation in Japanese and see where that takes us. But thank you very much.

And I hope your example will be an inspiration to people who follow my channel, who are interested in learning Japanese or any other language for that matter.

Steve POV: Thanks Steve

Steve: Thank you, Steve. Bye for now.


Learning Japanese & Doing Business in Japan 日本語を学び、日本でビジネスをする

Steve: Today I have Steve from Steve's Point of View, and that's not my point of view, it's Steve who has a channel which he beams to Japan from the United States and talks about all kinds of things, including cars, but he is fluent in Japanese. Steve : Aujourd'hui, j'ai Steve du point de vue de Steve, et ce n'est pas mon point de vue, c'est Steve qui a une chaîne qu'il diffuse au Japon depuis les États-Unis et parle de toutes sortes de choses, y compris les voitures, mais il parle couramment en japonais. スティーブ:今日はスティーブの視点からスティーブがいますが、それは私の視点ではありません。アメリカから日本に向けてビームを送り、車を含むあらゆることについて話すチャンネルを持っているのはスティーブですが、彼は流暢です。日本語で。 And I would like to find out from Steve, and you can begin then by introducing yourself, like, what is it that you do right now? そして、私はスティーブから知りたいのですが、それからあなたは自己紹介から始めることができます、例えば、あなたは今何をしているのですか?

How did you learn Japanese? どのように日本語を学びましたか? And how did you manage to turn your knowledge of Japanese into an activity that is a viable business. Et comment avez-vous réussi à transformer votre connaissance du japonais en une activité qui soit une entreprise viable. そして、どうやって日本語の知識を実行可能なビジネスに変えることができたのですか。

Steve POV: Hajimemashite Steve-san.

Steve: Hajimemashite, yoroshiku onegaishimasu. Steve: はじめまして、よろしくおねがいします。

Steve POV: Uh, thanks, uh, for having me on your channel. Steve POV: ええと、ええと、あなたのチャンネルに私を迎えてくれてありがとう。 It's an honor. それは光栄です。 I appreciate you having me. J'apprécie que tu m'aies. 私を迎えてくれてありがとう。 My name is Steve. Um, I have a channel called Steve's Point of View or Steve's POV for short. ええと、私は Steve's Point of View または略して Steve's POV と呼ばれるチャンネルを持っています。 I am fluent in Japanese. 私は日本語が堪能です。 Um, uh, but I didn't start off my life that way. Euh, euh, mais je n'ai pas commencé ma vie comme ça. ええと、ええと、でも私はそのように人生を始めたわけではありません。 I started studying Japanese, I really wasn't interested in Japan until I got to college in 1988 at the university of Wisconsin. 私は日本語を勉強し始めました。1988 年にウィスコンシン大学に入学するまで、日本にはまったく興味がありませんでした。

I was a business major there studying business. J'y étais étudiant en commerce. 私はそこでビジネスを勉強しているビジネス専攻でした。 Ik was daar bedrijfskunde en studeerde bedrijfskunde. And at the time Japan's economy was booming. そして当時、日本経済は活況を呈していました。 Uh, there were books being written about Japan becoming the number one economy in the world. ええと、日本が世界一の経済になるという本が書かれていました。 It was fascinating for sure. それは確かに魅力的でした。 Uh, and as a business major, I, I, my goal was to make money and to try to be successful in business. ええと、ビジネス専攻として、私、私、私の目標は、お金を稼ぎ、ビジネスで成功することでした。

And I thought by combining, uh, Japanese language with my business degree, it would be a way for me to achieve, uh, success, uh, working together with Japan. そして、日本語とビジネスの学位を組み合わせることで、日本と一緒に仕事をすることで、成功することができると思いました。 And, uh, that was my stepping stone and I got to Japan in the summer, uh, back in 1991. それが私の足がかりで、1991年の夏に日本に来ました。 I spent three months on a chicken farm in rural Japan, immersing myself into the culture, avoided speaking English for three months and came back to America with a, uh, a strong, uh, confidence, I guess that I can learn this language. 私は日本の田舎の養鶏場で3か月間過ごし、文化に没頭し、3か月間英語を話すことを避け、自信を持ってアメリカに戻ってきました。私はこの言語を学ぶことができると思います。 I can master the language, the culture as well. 言語も文化もマスターできます。 I can get the, learn it very well and, uh, be successful that way. 私はそれを得ることができ、それを非常によく学び、ええと、そのように成功することができます. And I won a contest in 1993 called the Japanese Speech Language Contest. そして1993年に日本語スピーチコンテストというコンテストで優勝しました。 It's a national contest held in Chicago and that, that got me, uh, back to Japan and got me my first job opportunity there in Japan in 1995. これはシカゴで開催された全国大会であり、それによって私は日本に戻り、1995年に日本での最初の就職の機会を得ました。

Steve: Interrupt you for just a second, because you said something that's so important. スティーブ:あなたはとても重要なことを言ったので、ちょっと中断してください。 You came back confident that you could learn the language. あなたはその言語を学ぶことができると自信を持って戻ってきました。 I think that's an absolute key, that, that sense that I can do this thing anyway. それが絶対的な鍵だと思います。とにかくこういうことができるという感覚です。 Sorry to interrupt. お邪魔してしまい申し訳ありません。 But I just thought, I thought that was such an important thing. Mais je pensais juste, je pensais que c'était une chose si importante. しかし、私はただ、それがとても重要なことだと思いました。

Steve POV: It's a fantastic point, Steve. Steve POV: 素晴らしい点ですね、Steve。 I wasn't confident until I went to Japan, I was not confident. 私は日本に行くまで自信がありませんでした。 I was one of the kids in the class who didn't have any experience with, with cultural exchanges or, or homestays or anything like that. J'étais l'un des enfants de la classe qui n'avait aucune expérience avec, avec les échanges culturels ou, ou les familles d'accueil ou quelque chose comme ça. 私はクラスの子供で、文化交流やホームステイなどの経験がありませんでした。 A lot of kids in the class did. クラスの多くの子供たちがそうしました。 I didn't. 私はしませんでした。 I felt that I, I wasn't very good until I got to Japan and spent that three months. 日本に来て3ヶ月を過ごすまで、自分はあまり上手ではないと感じていました。

And really that was the confidence. そして本当にそれは自信でした。 I came back with that confidence that I could learn this language. 私はこの言語を学ぶことができるという自信を持って戻ってきました。 I could speak it. 私はそれを話すことができました。 I could pronounce it. 発音できました。 I can, I could, I could do well with it. できる、できる、うまくやれる。 And then, you know, there's another point of language you maybe understand that they say at some point, when you're learning a language, you start to dream in the language. そして、あなたが理解しているかもしれない言語の別のポイントがあります。ある時点で、言語を学んでいると、その言語で夢を見始めると言われています。

You start to, you start to speak the language in your dreams. 夢の中でその言語を話し始めます。 And that, after that point is when I started actually having dreams in Japanese and somebody told me at that point, that's when you know you, I just mastered or to some degree, you know, you've got the language. その時点で、私は実際に日本語で夢を見始めたのですが、その時点で誰かが私に言いました。 And, uh, that day came and, uh, and from there I got back to Japan, started working, uh, worked, uh, for a Japanese company for about a year and a half or so before I ventured off on my own. Et, euh, ce jour est arrivé et, euh, et à partir de là, je suis retourné au Japon, j'ai commencé à travailler, euh, j'ai travaillé, euh, pour une entreprise japonaise pendant environ un an et demi avant de m'aventurer seul. そして、あの日が来て、あの、そこから日本に戻って、日本企業で働き始めて、あの、あの、日本企業で約1年半くらい働いてから、自分で冒険しました。

And I started, uh, doing, uh, translating and importing and exporting and all kinds of stuff in Japan as a foreigner, uh, back in the early nineties, uh, long way through there, back to the United States and California to now, to Texas. そして私は90年代初頭に外国人として日本で翻訳、輸入、輸出、そしてあらゆる種類のものを始めました. 、テキサスへ。 But I started YouTube about seven years ago. でも、YouTube を始めたのは 7 年ほど前です。 Uh, the passion of doing so was to show people, uh, there is a Japanese speaking, um, non-Japanese person here in north America who, uh, understands business and would love to work together and, and venture with people. ええと、そうすることの情熱は人々に見せることでした、ええと、ここ北米には、日本語を話す、ええと、外国人の人がいます。

And that was the purpose of starting steve's POV. そして、それが steve の POV を開始する目的でした。 And, uh, thankfully here, about seven years later, almost 400,000 subscribers strong. そして、ええと、ありがたいことに、ここでは、約7年後、40万人近くの加入者が強いです。 Uh, the channel is, um, something that's fun to do along with my real estate business as well here in Texas. Euh, la chaîne est, euh, quelque chose d'amusant à faire avec mes affaires immobilières ici au Texas. ええと、チャンネルは、ええと、ここテキサスで私の不動産ビジネスと一緒にやるのが楽しいものです。

Steve: So you have a real estate business in Texas, and then you have this, this YouTube channel, and I know you're very interested in cars, but, uh, do you just talk about cars, uh, or does your point of view include, you know, Steve, uh, you know, ranting on, like I do on a variety of different subjects in Japanese, uh, that your Japanese audience finds interesting, or is it mostly cars? Steve : Donc, vous avez une entreprise immobilière au Texas, et puis vous avez cette chaîne YouTube, et je sais que vous êtes très intéressé par les voitures, mais, euh, est-ce que vous parlez juste de voitures, euh, ou est-ce votre point de vue ? de vue incluent, vous savez, Steve, euh, vous savez, déclamer, comme je le fais sur une variété de sujets différents en japonais, euh, que votre public japonais trouve intéressant, ou est-ce principalement des voitures ? スティーブ:あなたはテキサスで不動産業を営んでいて、これ、このYouTubeチャンネルを持っています。あなたは車に非常に興味を持っていると思いますが、ええと、あなたはただ車について話しますか、ええと、それともあなたの主張をしますかスティーブ、ええと、私が日本語のさまざまな主題について行っているように、あなたの日本人の聴衆が面白いと思うのか、それともほとんどが車なのか、と怒鳴ります。

Steve POV: Well, Um, lately it's been mostly cars, but the channel started with something from my POV, the point of view that I had in living and working in Japan, living and experiencing Japanese culture and being an American. スティーブPOV:ええと、最近はほとんどが車ですが、チャンネルは私のPOVから始まりました。日本での生活と仕事、日本文化の生活と経験、そしてアメリカ人であるという観点からです。

And then coming back to the American, America and with a fresh Japanese work mindset, that way of doing things and coming back to America and experiencing a bit of culture shock, but even as an American back in from Japan. そして、アメリカ、アメリカに戻って、新鮮な日本の仕事の考え方で、物事を行い、アメリカに戻って、少しカルチャーショックを経験しますが、日本から戻ってきたアメリカ人としても。 And I started making videos where I played a Japanese salary man and a Japanese salesman in the same kind of short parad... parody type setting. そして、同じ種類のショートパラドで日本人サラリーマンと日本人セールスマンを演じるビデオを作り始めました...パロディータイプの設定。 And it shows kind of those big differences between Japan and America. そして、それは日本とアメリカの間のそれらの大きな違いのようなものを示しています。

Steve: Sorry, did you say a Japanese salary man and a Japanese salesman? Steve : Désolé, vous avez dit un salarié japonais et un vendeur japonais ? スティーブ:すみません、日本のサラリーマンと日本のセールスマンと言いましたか?

Steve POV: American salesman.

Steve: American Salesman.

Steve POV: American salesman versus Japanese salesman. スティーブPOV:アメリカのセールスマン対日本のセールスマン。

Steve: Okay, sorry. スティーブ:わかりました、ごめんなさい。

Steve POV: No problem. Sorry. I might've missed that. J'ai peut-être raté ça. 私はそれを逃したかもしれません。 Um, so, and you know, they're very different Japanese, you know, the necktie's on you're very, you know, you're suited up. Euh, alors, et vous savez, ils sont très différents. Les Japonais, vous savez, la cravate est sur vous êtes très, vous savez, vous êtes habillé. ええと、そうです、そしてあなたが知っている、彼らは非常に異なる日本人です、あなたが知っている、あなたのネクタイは非常に、あなたが知っている、あなたは適しています。

You're, you're very stiff. Tu es, tu es très raide. You're very rigid. You're very manual in many ways, there's way to do things. あなたは多くの点で非常に手動です、物事を行う方法があります。 And there's only one way to do things and yeah. そして、物事を行う唯一の方法があります。 And then Americans were a little more laid back, but you know, my feet are up on the desk guys. Et puis les Américains étaient un peu plus décontractés, mais vous savez, j'ai les pieds sur le bureau les gars. そして、アメリカ人はもう少しのんびりしていました、しかしあなたが知っている、私の足は机の人の上にあります。 T-shirts on Fridays and we're out of the office at 2.30, we got a baseball game for the kids, you know, it's, uh, it, these are things in Japan you didn't have. 金曜日のTシャツと私たちは2.30に不在です、私たちは子供たちのために野球の試合をしました、あなたが知っている、それは、ええと、それは、日本ではあなたが持っていなかったものです。 I found those differences very interesting. それらの違いは非常に興味深いものでした。 And I put some videos out about them that did very well. そして、私はそれらについていくつかのビデオを出しましたが、それは非常にうまくいきました。

Steve: You know, one of the big differences in my experience is in Japan, if you are dealing with someone in business, then you say, can you do this? スティーブ:私の経験の大きな違いの1つは日本です。ビジネスで誰かと取引している場合、これはできますか? And they said, "Hmm, do desho", very difficult. そして、彼らは「うーん、でしょ」と言ったのですが、とても難しいです。 That means he's going to do it. それは彼がそれをするつもりであることを意味します。 Uh, in the north America.

If you say, can you do this? Oh yeah, no problem. Uh, maybe, and maybe not. ええと、多分、そして多分そうではありません。

Steve POV: Maybe, maybe not. And everything's the best here. そして、すべてがここで最高です。 You know, we talk about us a lot.

Steve: Oh the best.

Steve POV: And it's mine. That's very personalized. You could be working for a company here, but you talking about my warehouse, my products, my guy in the warehouse, my guy in the back, you know, it's very personalized. あなたはここで会社で働いているかもしれませんが、あなたは私の倉庫、私の製品、倉庫の私の男、後ろの私の男について話している、あなたが知っている、それは非常にパーソナライズされています。

You're in Japan. It's about the group. It's about the company. It's about the bigger, uh, entity.

Steve: Plus in Japan, they don't necessarily, because you say my product is the best, that, they don't necessarily believe that, you know, just because you say yours is the best, you may not be convincing anyone and maybe you want to try to persuade them that you're going to try hard to, you know, look after your customer, rather than just saying mine is the best. スティーブ:それに加えて、日本では、必ずしもそうとは限りません。私の製品が最高だと言っているからといって、必ずしもそうとは限りません。自分の製品が最高だと言っているからといって、だれにも納得できないかもしれません。自分が一番だと言うのではなく、一生懸命頑張って顧客の世話をするように説得したいと思うかもしれません。

Steve POV: There's a bit more of a humble approach, I think, to, uh, to what you have there. スティーブPOV:あなたがそこに持っているものに対して、もう少し謙虚なアプローチがあると思います。

Steve: Yep, definitely.

Steve POV: It's not that hard, maybe sales push, or maybe as hard of a, you know, there's the best you've got to try the better, it's more of a humble approach. スティーブPOV:それはそれほど難しいことではありません、多分セールスプッシュ、あるいは多分難しいです、あなたが知っている、あなたがより良くしようとしなければならない最高のものがあります、それはもっと謙虚なアプローチです。 And you know, that's all built into the culture too. So when you learn Japanese language, right, Steve, it's not just learning "nani nani desu", "nani nani masu" you know, you know, the basic Japanese words, but it's, it's learning that culture.

And then the hierarchal Japanese society and how you humble yourself or elevate others, and how you talk to somebody older than yourself, or a teacher or a Shōchō, a president in a, in a company versus the guy who works below you in the company. そして、階層的な日本社会と、自分を謙虚にしたり、他の人を高めたりする方法、自分より年上の人、または会社の社長である教師や翔長と、会社であなたの下で働く人と話す方法。 It's very different. It's a different mindset that you need to understand. それはあなたが理解する必要がある別の考え方です。

Steve: But, but, uh, one thing I would say about that is that first of all, because Japan has had a different history and is from a very different culture, it doesn't mean that a North American can't learn that just as a Japanese person can learn the North American way. スティーブ:でも、ええと、まず第一に、日本は歴史が異なり、文化も大きく異なるので、北米がそれを学べないという意味ではありません。日本人が北米のやり方を学ぶことができるのと同じように。 And so I definitely feel that, I mean, I can go over there and feel I'm integrated in with them. ですから、私は間違いなく、あそこに行って、彼らと統合されていると感じることができると感じています。

I mean, they look at me, I look a little different, but culturally, in terms of what we're saying to each other, we're all operating kind of in the same cultural environment. つまり、彼らは私を見て、私は少し異なって見えますが、文化的には、私たちがお互いに言っていることに関して、私たちはすべて同じ文化的環境で活動しています。 Uh, that was one point. And I think another important point is you can't read a book which tells you how you should behave. そしてもう一つ重要な点は、あなたがどのように振る舞うべきかを教えてくれる本を読むことができないということだと思います。 And when you use the polite form and then expect to apply that you actually have to live it until you start to feel it naturally. そして、丁寧な形を使って、それを適用することを期待するとき、あなたがそれを自然に感じ始めるまで、あなたは実際にそれを生きなければならない。

Steve POV: Exactly true. And that's part of going there and, you know, there's a lot of foreigners that were in Japan, uh, now, you know, and over the years, more and more have increased and you see a lot of foreigners stay together with other foreigners that there's, you know, there are people who are with Japanese, of course, but if you really want to learn, you've got to go out with Japanese in different social situations, whether it's eating, whether it's drinking, whether it's studying together or whatever, it may be working together and to understand those non-language, the non-language language, and the gestures. And, but some of the differences, differences that are there that unless you experience it, like you said, you can't just learn it in, in a, in a book necessarily.

Steve: No, no. And I think it's important to then want to be part of that group. And the same applies in reverse. そして、同じことが逆に当てはまります。 If a Japanese person comes to North America, you have to want, or anybody learning any language, you have to want to be part of that group. And, and it's it's, if you're very self-conscious of yourself, here I am, I'm an American or a Canadian I'm in amongst all these Japanese. そして、それは、あなたが自分自身を非常に自覚しているなら、ここにいます、私はアメリカ人かカナダ人です。私はこれらすべての日本人の中にいます。 And, and somehow the fact that I'm this American speaking Japanese is somehow important. そして、どういうわけか、私がこのアメリカ人が日本語を話すという事実は、どういうわけか重要です。

All of that is negative. それはすべて否定的です。 You're just there, one of them, part of the group, uh, that's been my experience that leads to acquiring the language and feeling part of a group. あなたはただそこにいます、そのうちの一人、グループの一部、ええと、それは言語を習得し、グループの一部を感じることにつながる私の経験です。

Steve POV: If you go there and you act like, you know, Hey, well, I'm an American, I do things differently and all that. スティーブPOV:あなたがそこに行って、あなたが知っているように振る舞うなら、ねえ、まあ、私はアメリカ人です、私は違うことをします。 So you're, you're gonna, you're going to fail.

I, I, in my opinion, in, in, um, in really understanding and appreciating and learning Japanese culture and the beauty of it. I think you need to go overe there as if somebody comes here, it's not, you know, you have your culture, you have your identity. 誰かがここに来るようにそこに行く必要があると思います、そうではありません、あなたはあなたの文化を持っています、あなたはあなたのアイデンティティを持っています。 That's great. But you know, you're in their country. You're a guest in that country.

There are certain rules and certain formal things that are done. 行われる特定のルールと特定の正式なことがあります。 And believe me, if you don't follow those, you'll see maybe some people say, well, he's American, you know, or he's a foreigner. So, you know, we'll give him a pass on it. だから、あなたが知っている、私たちは彼にそれをパスします。 But if you're there and really trying to assimilate and you're doing stupid stuff, you're going to get called out on it. Mais si vous êtes là et que vous essayez vraiment de vous assimiler et que vous faites des choses stupides, vous allez vous faire appeler. しかし、あなたがそこにいて、本当に同化しようとしていて、あなたが愚かなことをしているなら、あなたはそれに声をかけられるでしょう。

Steve: But I think though it's important not to over sort of dramatize this. スティーブ:でも、これを過度に脚色しないことが重要だと思います。 Like sometimes you'll get Americans going over there, they're bowing 90 degrees. 時々アメリカ人が向こうに行くように、彼らは90度お辞儀をしています。 You know, you have to feel it. あなたが知っている、あなたはそれを感じなければなりません。 You have to have, you know, sensitive tenticles, antenna that, that you start to feel it naturally. あなたは、あなたがそれを自然に感じ始めることを、あなたが知っている、敏感なテント、アンテナを持たなければなりません。 And so it's comfortable doing it.

You don't want to be doing something that's uncomfortable. I mean, of course you'd take your shoes off before you walk in a house. But other than that, I don't think people need to be so uptight. Mais à part ça, je ne pense pas que les gens aient besoin d'être aussi tendus. でもそれ以外は、そんなに緊張する必要はないと思います。 If they just naturally connect with people, person to person, they'll gradually start to see how other people behave and start behaving the same way.

Just as we acquire language through imitation, we acquire that, that cultural communication skill through just letting it come. You know?

Steve POV: I agree with you.

Steve: Yeah. Tell me...

Steve POV: Please go ahead with your question but I agree with your point. Steve POV : Veuillez poser votre question, mais je suis d'accord avec votre point de vue.

Steve: No I was going to say, what is it now? スティーブ:いいえ、私は言うつもりでした、それは今何ですか? What is the appeal to your viewer base, 400,000 subscribers, that's a lot. Quel est l'attrait pour votre base de téléspectateurs, 400 000 abonnés, c'est beaucoup. あなたの視聴者ベース、40万人の加入者にとっての魅力は何ですか、それはたくさんです。 Uh, what is it you think that they find appealing in your videos? Euh, qu'est-ce que vous pensez qu'ils trouvent attirant dans vos vidéos ?

Steve POV: I think they, they find appealing a couple of things. One, the fact that I'm located in the United States, I'm, I'm not Japanese, but I'm doing my, provide my shows in Japanese. That I've raised a son here in the United States who was born in California, 私がここアメリカでカリフォルニアで生まれた息子を育てたこと、

now in Texas is 21 years old who speaks Japanese fluently. He's comfortable doing it and he's not, um, um, ashamed or embarrassed in any way. 彼はそれを快適に行うことができ、恥ずかしがったり、恥ずかしがったりすることはありません。 I think there's something unique and completely different about that. Um, I also try to point out in my videos, even if they're about cars, the cultural differences, whether it be how a box is packed, that came from Japan and how it's wrapped and presented versus something that showed up from just down the street that looks like it just went through, you know, all around the world and under the ocean and everywhere else and back. Euh, j'essaie aussi de souligner dans mes vidéos, même si elles concernent les voitures, les différences culturelles, que ce soit la façon dont une boîte est emballée, qui vient du Japon et comment elle est emballée et présentée par rapport à quelque chose qui est apparu juste dans la rue qui semble être passée, vous savez, partout dans le monde et sous l'océan et partout ailleurs et retour. ええと、私はまた、私のビデオで、たとえそれらが車についてであっても、文化の違い、それが箱の梱包方法であるかどうか、日本から来たものであるかどうか、そしてそれがどのように包まれて提示されるかと、それがちょうど通り抜けたように見える通りを下って、あなたが知っている、世界中でそして海の下でそして他のどこでもそして戻って。

You know, these, these things, I try, I think people maybe find that point of view interesting, um, a father, son relationship as well. あなたが知っている、これら、これらのこと、私は試みます、私は人々が多分その視点を面白いと思うかもしれないと思います、ええと、父と息子の関係も。 Certainly part of it as well. 確かにその一部でもあります。

Steve: Okay. Yeah. No, the Japanese attention to detail. いいえ、日本人は細部に気を配っています。 If they're going to do something, they're going to do it 110 percent. Whereas they're in north America, 65% is good. Alors qu'ils sont en Amérique du Nord, 65% c'est bien.

Steve POV: Maybe

Steve: Sometimes. We shouldn't be...yeah. Okay. Well, uh, we're going to have a chat on your channel in Japanese, and I'm certainly going to leave a link to your channel in my description box. ええと、私たちはあなたのチャンネルで日本語でチャットするつもりです、そして私は確かに私の説明ボックスにあなたのチャンネルへのリンクを残すつもりです。 So we can continue this conversation in Japanese and see where that takes us. ですから、この会話を日本語で続けて、それが私たちをどこに連れて行くかを見ることができます。 But thank you very much.

And I hope your example will be an inspiration to people who follow my channel, who are interested in learning Japanese or any other language for that matter. Et j'espère que votre exemple sera une source d'inspiration pour les personnes qui suivent ma chaîne, qui souhaitent apprendre le japonais ou toute autre langue d'ailleurs.

Steve POV: Thanks Steve

Steve: Thank you, Steve. Bye for now.