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Steve's Language Learning Tips, Learn Russian with Star Wars! Chat with Daria of @Real Russian Club (1)

Learn Russian with Star Wars! Chat with Daria of @Real Russian Club (1)

Hello, Steve here again, Steve Kaufmann.

And today I have the pleasure of speaking with an online teacher of

Russian, Daria of Real Russian club.

Remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click

on the bell for notifications.

If you follow me on a podcast service, please leave a review.

Okay.

Daria, I'm going to ask you to introduce yourself and then I have a number of

questions that I would like to ask.

...I want to start with the word that horrifies all the beginners in Russian.

Uh, so yeah, I'm a teacher.

You said I'm an online teacher about also, I am a teacher at

the university at CU Boulder.

Uh, so I teach offline, I teach online and I try to find this balance to find

this perfect way of learning Russian for people who learn with teacher,

with a teacher, for people who learn, um, by themselves, on their own.

So that's, that's pretty much what I try to do.

Okay.

We will leave a link to your YouTube channel in the description box.

Um, so there was a very famous Hungarian polyglot Kato Lomb or Lomb Kato who said,

who had a formula for language learning, which essentially was that it's a, it's a

function of the motivation of the learner, the time put in divided by inhibition,

frustration, difficulty and everything that reduces the level of motivation.

So my first question is how do you, what do you do to increase the

motivation for people to learn Russian?

And what do you do to decrease the difficulties, real or imagined, that

are there in the Russian language?

Oh, first of all, I think the most important thing is to use the materials

that are interesting for students.

It's hard to do it online, but offline I always try to ask in

a very first, uh, how to say?

On the very first lesson, I try to ask some personal questions: what they

like, what they are interested in, like somebody, uh, can be interested

in um, you know, science, chemistry, somebody might like motorcycles.

If somebody is a fan of Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings

or Star Wars or anything.

So at the very beginning, when people cannot deal with authentic Russian

materials as much, I try to use something they like uh, in Russian, for

example, we are going to use Star Wars characters in Russian, making dialogues

between, I don't know, Darth Vader and Yoda, completely made up of course.

Um, so something that would keep people engaged rather than using

random characters, like some Sylvia from Italy comes to Russia and

interacts or something like that.

So when it's something, uh, more funny, uh, it's a, it's just more engaging

and I encourage people when they learn on their own to do the same thing,

rather than using something that they don't care about like articles

about weather or something like that.

Use the same materials...

I, I just want to pick up on that because I think you make a very important point.

So many of these beginner books talk about, you know, Mario comes from the

Middle East, at the train station he's with, you know, customs, uh, he goes

to the bank, he goes to the doctor and all of these are totally uninteresting.

And typically the narrator is bored reading the story.

And so that's a very bad place to start.

And what you're suggesting is things that are not only of interest to your

learners, but also familiar to them.

I think it's very important to deal with material that is familiar.

And another problem, sometimes in language texts they go to the very esoteric,

cultural aspects of Korean or Japanese or Russian, whereas really they should

be beginning with, as you said, you know, Harry Potter or Star Wars or,

or something that is already familiar.

So we can go from the familiar to the less familiar because already the

language is of course not familiar.

Yes.

I totally agree with what you said.

And you mentioned boring narrators, this is a huge problem because especially

those older books that have audio with them, it seems as if, as if some robots

were reading those texts, it is awful.

So in my podcasts, in my I'll do lessons, I always try to

use as many emotions as I can.

So when it's like whispering or yelling or...

so I try to be engaging because when it's an audio lesson, it's even more difficult

to, to keep your attention there because you don't see the person speaking.

So those, um, monotonous and boring readings, it's a very discouraging.

So yes, emotion...

I checked out your videos by the way, and they are excellent and they're

very lively and that's exactly what people need to motivate them.

And we learn better.

There's more resonance.

We learn better.

Yeah.

So because, uh, otherwise you'll just fall asleep after what?

10, 10 minutes into the, into the Russian.

Uh, so you have materials that are interesting, being more emotional

and, uh, uh, pleasure, first of all.

So as soon as you feel discouraged, as soon as you feel overwhelmed, you feel

that, uh, I'm not having any progress.

I am at this...

how to pronounce?

Plateau.

In Russian we say...

Yhe plateau, yeah.

Yes.

Yes.

And it's an inevitable, it's inevitable.

Uh, and a lot of people are so discouraged that they think that

this is the end and they just quit.

And in reality, it's just a milestone.

You need to overcome this point and you will maybe skyrocket on the next stage.

So it's very important to keep your motivation.

While on the subject of the plateau, uh, how do you deal with the experience

that I had with Russian, and that is that no matter how many times you look

at the declension table, no matter how many times you look at the endings in

the three different genders, for all the different cases, you can't remember them.

You, you, maybe you can identify if you're reading from the context, you

can identify the meaning of that word.

But when you're speaking to try to get the uh, case ending, no matter how much

you study, it just seems so elusive.

How do you help your Russian learners improve in their use of cases?

Oh, first of all, I try to be very nice and especially in the first stages,

because I learned this mostly from my American students before I used to be

this harsh Russian person who corrects all mistakes, "you should be perfect!"

It was a long time ago, but that's how it started, unfortunately.

And then several people told me that I made them cry after I was

in my nice, I was in my nice stage.

I thought I was encouraging, but some people told me that they

were so frustrated even with minor corrections at the beginning that

they were crying and it turned my whole understanding of it upside down.

So after that, I am the nicest teacher ever at the beginning.

Of course, uh, I never correct.

Never correct people.

I'm happy when they say anything to me later when I hear them being

confident already, but when they make mistakes, I will correct them.

And then we will concentrate on grammatical aspects of that.

But at the beginning, it's important just to try because no harm done

if you mix those endings of cases.

It's very confusing.

Even for Russian people.

It's very confusing.

And we learn cases at Russian schools being native speakers

still for several years.

We'll learn those endings, those questions for the cases.

It's, it's a difficult thing.

We can't underestimate it.

So yeah, just slowly try...

I think that's a very important point that you just made.

There is a stage in our learning where we want to be corrected, but at the

early stages, we need encouragement.

We need encouragement to keep speaking and many mistakes do correct themselves.

Conversely many of the corrections that the teacher

makes have no effect whatsoever.

Uh, I know that, uh, in different languages, if I look at my sort of

lesson notes I get from my teacher, I make the same mistakes every week.

So it's, it's a gradual process, combination of reading the rules

and the teacher correcting you and self-correcting, but it certainly,

there's no quick solution to these things.

And you just have to hope that eventually the brain gets used to them.

But, uh, cases are a problem in Russian.

And how about the other difficulty in Russian, which is this whole

aspect of verbs, verbs of emotions.

Do you have any sort of secret in helping people with this?

For verbs, especially verbs of motion, verbs with prefixes I

have a special course for that.

I try again to put them into some funny context.

I create stories again, using Harry Potter or using some famous actors, uh, using,

uh, some popular, popular characters.

And I try to put those verbs into a funny context, funny mini story, and

then I will ask simple questions for every sentence, like ... and, uh,

for 20 minutes straight, just repeating the same stuff again and again.

And, um, since mostly those prefaces keep their meaning for most of the verbs after

10 mini stories like that, this is, this just gets somewhere deep in your memory.

And next time, just click and you use it naturally because you heard

it and repeated it so many times.

You just have the feeling of when you want to go out, you say ... so

it's just the point of practice and hearing the same thing again and

again, in the same situations, but with different different characters.

And, and there's no predicting when all of a sudden we start being able

to use some of these things correctly.

So sometimes it's a bit, it's the same as trying to remember words, certain

vocabulary items just never stick.

And we shouldn't allow ourselves to be frustrated and the same way

with grammar, we shouldn't allow ourselves to be frustrated at some

point it will probably click in.

And, uh, I think your, your approach of patience, repetition, but not

being too demanding of people.

It makes a lot of sense.

Um, one final note.

So I think, uh, if we...

today in the world, if we look at the most popular languages,

you know, languages that are...

that people are learning, obviously English is probably number one

because of its practical usefulness.

And then historically certain European languages like Spanish are popular.

And, uh, recently Korean and Japanese have become popular for reasons

related to pop culture and so forth.

I mean, I happen to be a fan of the 19th century.

So Russia, for me, it was very attractive.

Uh, and of course, Russia is an enormous country with, uh, not only, you're not

only sort of the original Slavic Russian people, but it's the whole influence

of central Asia and the Caucuses.

I mean, it's just a spectacular world, this whole Russian world thing.

That's me.

What is most attractive to your students?

What brings them to Russian?

Oh today it's a very complicated question because unfortunately what

I notice in the past decade, uh, the interest to the Russian language

is, is decreasing unfortunately.

And, uh, more and more often each new semester, the university, I

see that it's some people that are interested in uh, military stuff.

So there people in uniforms sitting in class, I'm like, oh, okay.

It's not a good reason to learn Russian, but, uh, but unfortunate...

so this is one reason, I guess a lot of, uh, military people are

suddenly very interested in Russia.

Um, but peaceful people usually are interested in, um, literature.

Learn Russian with Star Wars! Chat with Daria of @Real Russian Club (1) Russisch lernen mit Star Wars! Chat mit Daria von @Real Russian Club (1) ¡Aprende ruso con Star Wars! Chatea con Daria de @Real Russian Club (1) Apprendre le russe avec Star Wars ! Chat avec Daria de @Real Russian Club (1) Impara il russo con Star Wars! Chatta con Daria di @Real Russian Club (1) スター・ウォーズでロシア語を学ぼうリアルロシア語倶楽部のダリアさんとおしゃべり (1) Ucz się rosyjskiego z Gwiezdnymi Wojnami! Czat z Darią z @Real Russian Club (1) Aprender russo com a Guerra das Estrelas! Conversa com Daria do @Real Russian Club (1) Учи русский со Звездными войнами! Чат с Дарьей из @Real Russian Club (1) Вивчайте російську разом із "Зоряними війнами"! Поспілкуйтеся з Дар'єю з @Real Russian Club (1) 通过星球大战学习俄语!与@Real Russian Club 的 Daria 聊天(一) 透過星際大戰學習俄語!與 @Real Russian Club 的 Daria 聊天 (1)

Hello, Steve here again, Steve Kaufmann.

And today I have the pleasure of speaking with an online teacher of

Russian, Daria of Real Russian club.

Remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click

on the bell for notifications.

If you follow me on a podcast service, please leave a review.

Okay.

Daria, I'm going to ask you to introduce yourself and then I have a number of

questions that I would like to ask.

...I want to start with the word that horrifies all the beginners in Russian. ...Я хочу начать со слова, которое приводит в ужас всех начинающих русский язык.

Uh, so yeah, I'm a teacher. А, так да, я учитель.

You said I'm an online teacher about also, I am a teacher at Ви сказали, що я також онлайн-вчитель, я вчитель у

the university at CU Boulder. университет в CU Боулдер.

Uh, so I teach offline, I teach online and I try to find this balance to find

this perfect way of learning Russian for people who learn with teacher, это идеальный способ изучения русского языка для людей, которые учатся с учителем,

with a teacher, for people who learn, um, by themselves, on their own.

So that's, that's pretty much what I try to do.

Okay.

We will leave a link to your YouTube channel in the description box.

Um, so there was a very famous Hungarian polyglot Kato Lomb or Lomb Kato who said,

who had a formula for language learning, which essentially was that it's a, it's a

function of the motivation of the learner, the time put in divided by inhibition, функция на мотивацията на ученика, на вложеното време, разделено на инхибицията,

frustration, difficulty and everything that reduces the level of motivation. 欲求不満、困難、そしてモチベーションのレベルを下げるすべてのもの。

So my first question is how do you, what do you do to increase the

motivation for people to learn Russian?

And what do you do to decrease the difficulties, real or imagined, that И какво правите, за да намалите трудностите, реални или въображаеми, които

are there in the Russian language?

Oh, first of all, I think the most important thing is to use the materials

that are interesting for students.

It's hard to do it online, but offline I always try to ask in

a very first, uh, how to say?

On the very first lesson, I try to ask some personal questions: what they

like, what they are interested in, like somebody, uh, can be interested

in um, you know, science, chemistry, somebody might like motorcycles.

If somebody is a fan of Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings Ако някой е фен на Хари Потър или "Властелинът на пръстените

or Star Wars or anything. или Star Wars или нещо друго.

So at the very beginning, when people cannot deal with authentic Russian Така че в самото начало, когато хората не могат да се справят с автентичния руски

materials as much, I try to use something they like uh, in Russian, for материали, колкото, Опитвам се да използвам нещо, което им харесва ъ, на руски, за

example, we are going to use Star Wars characters in Russian, making dialogues

between, I don't know, Darth Vader and Yoda, completely made up of course. между, не знам, Дарт Вейдър и Йода, напълно измислени, разбира се.

Um, so something that would keep people engaged rather than using

random characters, like some Sylvia from Italy comes to Russia and

interacts or something like that. взаимодейства или нещо подобно.

So when it's something, uh, more funny, uh, it's a, it's just more engaging Така че, когато става дума за нещо по-забавно, то е просто по-ангажиращо.

and I encourage people when they learn on their own to do the same thing,

rather than using something that they don't care about like articles

about weather or something like that.

Use the same materials...

I, I just want to pick up on that because I think you make a very important point. Искам само да се спра на това, защото смятам, че повдигате много важен въпрос.

So many of these beginner books talk about, you know, Mario comes from the

Middle East, at the train station he's with, you know, customs, uh, he goes Близкия изток, на гарата той е с, знаете, митничарите, ама той отива

to the bank, he goes to the doctor and all of these are totally uninteresting.

And typically the narrator is bored reading the story. И обикновено разказвачът се отегчава, четейки историята.

And so that's a very bad place to start. И това е много лошо начало.

And what you're suggesting is things that are not only of interest to your И това, което предлагате, са неща, които са от интерес не само за вашия

learners, but also familiar to them. учащите, но и познати за тях.

I think it's very important to deal with material that is familiar.

And another problem, sometimes in language texts they go to the very esoteric, И още един проблем - понякога в езиковите текстове се стига до много езотерични неща, И еще проблема, иногда в языковых текстах доходят до самой эзотерики,

cultural aspects of Korean or Japanese or Russian, whereas really they should культурные аспекты корейского, японского или русского, тогда как на самом деле они должны

be beginning with, as you said, you know, Harry Potter or Star Wars or, начать, как вы сказали, с Гарри Поттера или Звездных войн или,

or something that is already familiar. или что-то уже знакомое.

So we can go from the familiar to the less familiar because already the

language is of course not familiar.

Yes.

I totally agree with what you said.

And you mentioned boring narrators, this is a huge problem because especially

those older books that have audio with them, it seems as if, as if some robots тези по-стари книги, които имат аудио с тях, изглежда така, сякаш, сякаш някои роботи

were reading those texts, it is awful.

So in my podcasts, in my I'll do lessons, I always try to Така че в моите подкасти, в уроците ми "Ще правя уроци" винаги се опитвам да

use as many emotions as I can.

So when it's like whispering or yelling or... Така че, когато е като шепот, вик или...

so I try to be engaging because when it's an audio lesson, it's even more difficult така че се опитвам да бъда увлекателна, защото когато е аудио урок, е още по-трудно

to, to keep your attention there because you don't see the person speaking. за да задържите вниманието си там, защото не виждате човека, който говори.

So those, um, monotonous and boring readings, it's a very discouraging. Така че тези монотонни и скучни четения са много обезсърчителни.

So yes, emotion...

I checked out your videos by the way, and they are excellent and they're Между другото, проверих видеоклиповете ви и те са отлични и те са

very lively and that's exactly what people need to motivate them. много жив и точно това е нужно на хората, за да ги мотивира.

And we learn better.

There's more resonance.

We learn better.

Yeah.

So because, uh, otherwise you'll just fall asleep after what? И така, защото иначе просто ще заспите след какво?

10, 10 minutes into the, into the Russian.

Uh, so you have materials that are interesting, being more emotional

and, uh, uh, pleasure, first of all. и, ъ, ъ, удоволствие, на първо място.

So as soon as you feel discouraged, as soon as you feel overwhelmed, you feel Така че веднага щом се почувствате обезкуражени, веднага щом се почувствате претоварени, почувствате

that, uh, I'm not having any progress. че нямам никакъв напредък.

I am at this... Аз съм в това...

how to pronounce?

Plateau.

In Russian we say...

Yhe plateau, yeah.

Yes.

Yes.

And it's an inevitable, it's inevitable.

Uh, and a lot of people are so discouraged that they think that И много хора са толкова обезкуражени, че мислят, че

this is the end and they just quit.

And in reality, it's just a milestone.

You need to overcome this point and you will maybe skyrocket on the next stage. Трябва да преодолеете тази точка и може би ще се изстреляте на следващия етап.

So it's very important to keep your motivation.

While on the subject of the plateau, uh, how do you deal with the experience Докато говорим за платото, как се справяте с опита

that I had with Russian, and that is that no matter how many times you look че съм имал с руски, и това е, че без значение колко пъти гледате

at the declension table, no matter how many times you look at the endings in

the three different genders, for all the different cases, you can't remember them. трите различни пола, за всички различни случаи, не можете да ги запомните.

You, you, maybe you can identify if you're reading from the context, you

can identify the meaning of that word.

But when you're speaking to try to get the uh, case ending, no matter how much

you study, it just seems so elusive.

How do you help your Russian learners improve in their use of cases? Как помагате на изучаващите руски език да се усъвършенстват в използването на казуси?

Oh, first of all, I try to be very nice and especially in the first stages,

because I learned this mostly from my American students before I used to be защото научих това най-вече от моите американски ученици, преди да бъда

this harsh Russian person who corrects all mistakes, "you should be perfect!"

It was a long time ago, but that's how it started, unfortunately.

And then several people told me that I made them cry after I was

in my nice, I was in my nice stage.

I thought I was encouraging, but some people told me that they

were so frustrated even with minor corrections at the beginning that

they were crying and it turned my whole understanding of it upside down. те плачеха и това преобърна цялото ми разбиране за него. 彼らは泣いていて、それは私の全体的な理解をひっくり返しました。

So after that, I am the nicest teacher ever at the beginning.

Of course, uh, I never correct.

Never correct people.

I'm happy when they say anything to me later when I hear them being Радвам се, когато ми кажат нещо по-късно, когато ги чуя да са

confident already, but when they make mistakes, I will correct them.

And then we will concentrate on grammatical aspects of that.

But at the beginning, it's important just to try because no harm done Но в началото е важно просто да опитате, защото няма вреда.

if you mix those endings of cases. ако смесите тези окончания на случаите.

It's very confusing.

Even for Russian people.

It's very confusing.

And we learn cases at Russian schools being native speakers И ние учим случаи в руските училища като носители на езика

still for several years. в продължение на няколко години.

We'll learn those endings, those questions for the cases.

It's, it's a difficult thing.

We can't underestimate it. Не можем да го подценяваме.

So yeah, just slowly try...

I think that's a very important point that you just made.

There is a stage in our learning where we want to be corrected, but at the

early stages, we need encouragement.

We need encouragement to keep speaking and many mistakes do correct themselves. 私たちは話し続けるための励ましが必要であり、多くの間違いは自分自身を正します。

Conversely many of the corrections that the teacher 逆に、教師が行った修正の多く

makes have no effect whatsoever. 何の効果もありません。

Uh, I know that, uh, in different languages, if I look at my sort of

lesson notes I get from my teacher, I make the same mistakes every week.

So it's, it's a gradual process, combination of reading the rules

and the teacher correcting you and self-correcting, but it certainly,

there's no quick solution to these things.

And you just have to hope that eventually the brain gets used to them.

But, uh, cases are a problem in Russian.

And how about the other difficulty in Russian, which is this whole А какво ще кажете за другата трудност в руския език, която е цялата тази

aspect of verbs, verbs of emotions.

Do you have any sort of secret in helping people with this? これで人々を助けることに何か秘密がありますか? Есть ли у вас какой-то секрет в помощи людям в этом?

For verbs, especially verbs of motion, verbs with prefixes I 動詞、特に動詞の場合、接頭辞Iが付いた動詞 Для глаголов, особенно глаголов движения, глаголов с префиксами I

have a special course for that. есть специальный курс для этого.

I try again to put them into some funny context.

I create stories again, using Harry Potter or using some famous actors, uh, using,

uh, some popular, popular characters. някои популярни, популярни герои.

And I try to put those verbs into a funny context, funny mini story, and

then I will ask simple questions for every sentence, like ... and, uh,

for 20 minutes straight, just repeating the same stuff again and again. 20 минути без прекъсване, като повтаряше едно и също нещо отново и отново.

And, um, since mostly those prefaces keep their meaning for most of the verbs after И тъй като тези предлози запазват значението си за повечето глаголи след

10 mini stories like that, this is, this just gets somewhere deep in your memory. 10 такива мини истории, това е, това просто се запечатва някъде дълбоко в паметта ви.

And next time, just click and you use it naturally because you heard И следващия път просто кликнете и го използвайте естествено, защото сте чули

it and repeated it so many times. и го повтори толкова много пъти.

You just have the feeling of when you want to go out, you say ... so Просто имате усещането, че когато искате да излезете, казвате ... така че

it's just the point of practice and hearing the same thing again and

again, in the same situations, but with different different characters.

And, and there's no predicting when all of a sudden we start being able И не може да се предвиди кога изведнъж ще започнем да можем да

to use some of these things correctly.

So sometimes it's a bit, it's the same as trying to remember words, certain

vocabulary items just never stick. елементите на речника просто никога не се придържат.

And we shouldn't allow ourselves to be frustrated and the same way

with grammar, we shouldn't allow ourselves to be frustrated at some

point it will probably click in.

And, uh, I think your, your approach of patience, repetition, but not

being too demanding of people.

It makes a lot of sense.

Um, one final note.

So I think, uh, if we...

today in the world, if we look at the most popular languages,

you know, languages that are...

that people are learning, obviously English is probably number one

because of its practical usefulness. поради практическата му полезност.

And then historically certain European languages like Spanish are popular.

And, uh, recently Korean and Japanese have become popular for reasons

related to pop culture and so forth.

I mean, I happen to be a fan of the 19th century. Искам да кажа, че съм почитател на XIX век.

So Russia, for me, it was very attractive.

Uh, and of course, Russia is an enormous country with, uh, not only, you're not

only sort of the original Slavic Russian people, but it's the whole influence

of central Asia and the Caucuses. в Централна Азия и Кавказ.

I mean, it's just a spectacular world, this whole Russian world thing. Искам да кажа, че целият този руски свят е просто впечатляващ.

That's me.

What is most attractive to your students? Какво е най-привлекателно за вашите ученици?

What brings them to Russian? Какво ги води към руския език?

Oh today it's a very complicated question because unfortunately what

I notice in the past decade, uh, the interest to the Russian language

is, is decreasing unfortunately.

And, uh, more and more often each new semester, the university, I

see that it's some people that are interested in uh, military stuff. виждам, че това са хора, които се интересуват от военни неща.

So there people in uniforms sitting in class, I'm like, oh, okay.

It's not a good reason to learn Russian, but, uh, but unfortunate...

so this is one reason, I guess a lot of, uh, military people are

suddenly very interested in Russia.

Um, but peaceful people usually are interested in, um, literature.