×

We use cookies to help make LingQ better. By visiting the site, you agree to our cookie policy.


image

Steve's Language Learning Tips, Language and Culture | First Learn the Language, Then the Culture.

Language and Culture | First Learn the Language, Then the Culture.

There is plenty of opportunity when we speak a foreign language to come across as silly. Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here and today I want to talk about cultural sensitivities and the specific cultural aspects of a language and why we should ignore them when we start into a new language and when it's appropriate to be more focused on this.

Uh, remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notifications. Um, if you're following me on a podcast service, please leave a review. So the reason I bring this up is that, uh, I was on Twitter and I had done a video earlier where I said that when I start a new language, I'm really not interested in the sort of detail, you know, names of relatives because many languages have more specific terms for relatives, you know, nd uncle is not just an uncle, it's either the mother, his brother, or the father's brother or cousin could be any number of combinations of relatives. And so an older sister, younger sister, older brother, younger brother, all of these things are, in some languages there's a lot of detail there that we don't have in English. And these are things that we eventually need to know if we're going to be operating comfortably in the language, but it's not a good idea in my experience to be confronted with these things at an early stage in the language, uh, the same goes with sort of polite language or different level of, uh, levels of politeness or introducing, you know, special festivals.

I remember in Japanese, there was early on, there was a lesson on irises and blue flags. It's some festival in Japan that I still don't know anything about. There's a tendency on the part of people who write textbooks to want to focus on what is different than call it esoteric and potentially attractive in the new culture.

Uh, but in my view, these things, if they come early, Uh, in the language learning process, they just add more difficulty. We're learning a new language, new words, new sounds. My experience is the more we can deal with things that are familiar to us, familiar situations, husband and wife, a brother and a sister without worrying about terms for older or younger, just people interacting with each other, using common vocabulary.

If we can have this more familiar content, then it's going to be easier to learn the language. And if we don't learn the term for older sister, younger sister at the beginner stage will eventually learn it. And the same is true with different levels of politeness. Now, so I said something to this effect in a video and, you know, I have been having sort of extracts or excerpts of some of my previous videos featured again.

So this came up and then this generated this flurry of activity on Twitter. Now, you know, and I can't remember what the wording was, but somebody sort of commented, you know, uh, I'm shocked that you would, uh, ignore these fine aspects of, uh, the culture. Um, many of the beginner words are tied up with these aspects of the culture.

And I said, well, give me some examples and the person didn't come back with any examples. Other than to say that she was shocked that I was prepared to be rude in the language. Um, you know, I think there is a tendency when we learn a language where their culture is very different or even not so different, that we become over-sensitive to these cultural differences. It's not easy to offend people. It's not easy to be rude. Uh, just because we use the wrong word or the wrong degree of politeness or anything else. If we are a beginner, first of all, when we're starting in the language, in my opinion, better off to focus on input.

So you're just absorbing the language and you may notice that sometimes it's "vous" and sometimes it's "tu", for example, in French. Polite or familiar, not familiar and graduallywe get used to this and maybe we find an explanation somewhere and we kind of tuck that in the back of our minds. And then when we go to speak eventually a few months later, we start speaking.

We may get it wrong, but we won't offend anyone. Uh, any more than if someone who is a beginner in English speaks to us and uses the wrong word or says something wrong. I mean, unless they're swearing at us, we're not going to be offended. We won't necessarily consider the person rude. We might, we might find them silly.

I mean, there is plenty of opportunity when we speak a foreign language to come across as silly. That comes with the territory. You have to be willing to sound less intelligent, uh, somewhat sillier than in your own language. That is something we have to accept if we're speaking a foreign language, but at the early stages, I think everything should be done to make it as easy as possible to get the language in you. So familiar situations, but here are these different words and here is how they say good morning, or here is how they say I'm going to work today or whatever it is. Very standard type, uh, words and situations. That's why our mini stories at LingQ are largely call them culturally neutral.

They're not completely culturally neutral. That's not possible. They were written by someone who, actually a Canadian woman who teaches English in Japan. So she's going to reflect that to some extent, but in many cultures of the world, we get up, we make breakfast, people go to work, uh, people might be cleaning their apartment or their house or any of the different situations that we have there are relatively, relatively cultural neutral. They don't go into very culturally specific things in our mini stories. Those are our existing 60 mini stories. I think it would be great to have some culturally specific mini stories so that the principle of the many stories, the repetition, the high-frequency verbs, we contain... we sort of maintain that, but we introduce things that are specific to Persian culture, which would be fine for me because I'm learning Persian or Arabic culture or uh, or, or France or China or Russia or Japan, so we can have those. Uh, I think those are better later. Now, bare in mind, I'm talking about my personal perspective on this, of course, I eventually wanted to get into the cultural, uh, culturally specific things, and I want to choose those things that I find interesting.

And it may be that, uh, you know, Japanese cooking is what I'm interested in more so than say Japanese dance, for example, or I'm not interested in anime. We can choose those things that we're interested in, and that will inspire us further in our study. But if at an early stage, we don't get the degree of politeness correct in Korean or Japanese, that doesn't mean we won't be able to get it right later on. This is another thing, cause there's a number of exchanges here on Twitter and people implying well, you know, if you don't get it right at the beginning, you'll forever be speaking impolitely. That's not true. Uh, there are any number of things that we get wrong at the early stage.

From the tense to the person, to the gender to... and that doesn't mean that at some stage, because we've been listening and reading so much and becoming more and more familiar with the language at some stage, we'll get better and we'll get better with all of these aspects. So I think the, this idea that you have to get, and it's a bit like, you know, a lot of the things that are typically introduced early on in, in these beginner books, including colors, for example, I have no capacity for absorbing seven colours, uh, in one lesson, uh, or all the numbers in one lesson. Uh, it's just part and parcel of all the things that will gradually be, be absorbed by the brain in due course, and ideally absorbed within content that we can cope with, that is relatively familiar. And, you know, words that repeat often and gradually we get better and as we build up, we pursue areas of interest or we get better. And we realize, actually, if you're talking about levels of politeness in Japanese and Chinese, we realize as we understand and hear better, what other people are saying. And we understand better in what situations, which words are used, which levels of politeness are used.

We then get better at doing that ourselves. Uh, and that's part of the reason why I'm very much against, uh, teaching slang because you, you also have to have a good sense of where slang is appropriate. Not to mention swear words which can be used at some point but are best avoided until we have a good sense of when to use them.

Similarly, the levels of politeness, we will eventually develop a feel for when to use them. And the idea that somehow people in other cultures are easily offended if we get things wrong, even though we know that we ourselves wouldn't be by someone getting similar things wrong, why would they be? I think there's sort of an over sensitivity to what we perceive to be more, you know, exotic cultures that we have to step very carefully, walk on eggshells.

I don't believe that. I think people are similar everywhere. They encourage you to learn the language. Not everyone, not everyone. There will be people who might be offended. There are people who have no patience sort of to deal with you. If you're learning their language and you butcher it, there's always those people, but the majority of people aren't that way.

So I just thought I would comment on that. So when you get started in the language, I say, go easy on the culture. You'll get to it eventually. And you'll find those things that interest you and, and presumably it's, uh, it's, uh, a general interest in the culture that has encouraged you sort of to learn the language, but it'll all come and do course you don't have to get it in the big enterprise.

So, that would be something that I've been engaging with people on Twitter. And of course, Twitter is a very special kind of medium people tend to just say things without really having thought them through. Uh, but it's, it's fun. It's... you get a sense of what some people are thinking, how representative they are.

It's hard to gauge because if you're in a particular silo, you'll get a lot of people commenting, reflecting a similar point of view that may not be very representative. So, um, yeah, with that, the idea of culture, I've always been interested in culture, but not upfront. And I leave you with a couple of videos that talk about getting started in a language and the role of culture.

Thank you for listening. Bye for now.


Language and Culture | First Learn the Language, Then the Culture. Sprache und Kultur | Erst die Sprache lernen, dann die Kultur. Γλώσσα και πολιτισμός | Μάθετε πρώτα τη γλώσσα και μετά τον πολιτισμό. Language and Culture | First Learn the Language, Then the Culture. Lengua y cultura | Primero aprender la lengua, luego la cultura. Langue et culture | Apprendre d'abord la langue, puis la culture. Lingua e cultura | Prima si impara la lingua, poi la cultura. 言語と文化|最初に言語を学び、次に文化を学びます。 언어와 문화 | 먼저 언어를 배우고 그다음에 문화를 배우세요. Kalba ir kultūra | Pirmiausia išmokite kalbą, tada kultūrą. Język i kultura | Najpierw poznaj język, potem kulturę. Língua e Cultura | Primeiro aprender a língua, depois a cultura. Язык и культура | Сначала выучите язык, потом культуру. Dil ve Kültür | Önce Dili, Sonra Kültürü Öğrenin. Мова та культура | Спочатку вивчіть мову, потім культуру. 语言与文化 |先学语言,再学文化。 語言與文化 |先學語言,再學文化。

There is plenty of opportunity when we speak a foreign language to come across as silly. Ci sono molte opportunità quando parliamo una lingua straniera per sembrare sciocchi. 私たちが外国語を話すとき、ばかげているように出くわす機会はたくさんあります。 Когда мы говорим на иностранном языке, есть много возможностей показаться глупыми. Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here and today I want to talk about cultural sensitivities and the specific cultural aspects of a language and why we should ignore them when we start into a new language and when it's appropriate to be more focused on this. こんにちは、スティーブ・カウフマンです。今日は、文化的感受性と言語の特定の文化的側面について、そして新しい言語を始めるときにそれらを無視する必要がある理由と、これにもっと焦点を当てるのが適切な場合について話したいと思います。 Привет, здесь Стив Кауфманн, и сегодня я хочу поговорить о культурных особенностях и специфических культурных аспектах языка, а также о том, почему мы должны игнорировать их, когда начинаем изучать новый язык, и когда уместно уделять этому больше внимания.

Uh, remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click on the bell for notifications. Помните, если вам нравятся эти видео, пожалуйста, подпишитесь, нажмите на колокольчик для уведомлений. Um, if you're following me on a podcast service, please leave a review. Если вы следите за мной на сервисе подкастов, пожалуйста, оставьте отзыв. So the reason I bring this up is that, uh, I was on Twitter and I had done a video earlier where I said that when I start a new language, I'm really not interested in the sort of detail, you know, names of relatives because many languages have more specific terms for relatives, you know, nd uncle is not just an uncle, it's either the mother, his brother, or the father's brother or cousin could be any number of combinations of relatives. だから私がこれを取り上げる理由は、ええと、私はツイッターにいて、以前にビデオを作ったので、新しい言語を始めるとき、私は実際にはそのような詳細には興味がないと言ったからです、あなたが知っている、名前多くの言語には親戚のより具体的な用語があるため、おじは単なるおじではなく、母親、兄弟、または父親の兄弟またはいとこは、親戚の任意の数の組み合わせである可能性があります。 A razão de eu trazer isso à tona é que, uh, eu estava no Twitter e fiz um vídeo antes onde eu disse que quando eu começo um novo idioma, eu realmente não estou interessado no tipo de detalhe, você sabe, nomes de parentes porque muitas línguas têm termos mais específicos para parentes, você sabe, e tio não é apenas um tio, é a mãe, o irmão dele ou o irmão ou primo do pai pode ser qualquer combinação de parentes. Итак, причина, по которой я говорю об этом, заключается в том, что я был в Твиттере и ранее снял видео, в котором я сказал, что когда я начинаю новый язык, меня действительно не интересуют такие детали, вы знаете, имена родственников, потому что во многих языках есть более конкретные термины для родственников, знаете ли, а дядя — это не просто дядя, это либо мать, либо его брат, либо брат или двоюродный брат отца, может быть любое количество комбинаций родственников. And so an older sister, younger sister, older brother, younger brother, all of these things are, in some languages there's a lot of detail there that we don't have in English. Так, старшая сестра, младшая сестра, старший брат, младший брат - все это в некоторых языках имеет много деталей, которых нет в английском. And these are things that we eventually need to know if we're going to be operating comfortably in the language, but it's not a good idea in my experience to be confronted with these things at an early stage in the language, uh, the same goes with sort of polite language or different level of, uh, levels of politeness or introducing, you know, special festivals.

I remember in Japanese, there was early on, there was a lesson on irises and blue flags. 日本語で覚えていますが、早い段階で菖蒲と青い旗のレッスンがありました。 Eu me lembro em japonês, havia no início, era uma aula sobre íris e bandeira azul. Помню на японском, там было рано, был урок про ирисы и голубые флаги. It's some festival in Japan that I still don't know anything about. まだ何も知らない日本のお祭りです。 There's a tendency on the part of people who write textbooks to want to focus on what is different than call it esoteric and potentially attractive in the new culture. 教科書を書く人々の側では、それを新しい文化において秘教的で潜在的に魅力的であると呼ぶのとは異なることに焦点を合わせたいと思う傾向があります。 У тех, кто пишет учебники, есть тенденция сосредотачиваться на том, что отличается от того, что называют эзотерическим и потенциально привлекательным в новой культуре. Ders kitapları yazan kişilerde, yeni kültürde ezoterik ve potansiyel olarak çekici olarak adlandırmaktan ziyade farklı olana odaklanma eğilimi vardır.

Uh, but in my view, these things, if they come early, Uh, in the language learning process, they just add more difficulty. ええと、しかし私の見解では、これらのことは、もしそれらが早く来るならば、ええと、言語学習プロセスにおいて、それらはただより多くの困難を追加します。 Э-э, но на мой взгляд, эти вещи, если они появляются раньше, э-э, в процессе изучения языка, они просто добавляют больше трудностей. We're learning a new language, new words, new sounds. My experience is the more we can deal with things that are familiar to us, familiar situations, husband and wife, a brother and a sister without worrying about terms for older or younger, just people interacting with each other, using common vocabulary. 私の経験では、身近なこと、身近な状況、夫婦、兄妹、年配の言葉を気にせず、共通の語彙を使って相互作用する人々だけに対処できるようになりました。

If we can have this more familiar content, then it's going to be easier to learn the language. このような身近なコンテンツがあれば、言語の学習はより簡単になります。 And if we don't learn the term for older sister, younger sister at the beginner stage will eventually learn it. そして、姉の用語を学ばなければ、初心者の妹はやがてそれを学ぶでしょう。 And the same is true with different levels of politeness. そして、同じことがさまざまなレベルの礼儀正しさにも当てはまります。 E o mesmo é verdade com diferentes níveis de polidez. Now, so I said something to this effect in a video and, you know, I have been having sort of extracts or excerpts of some of my previous videos featured again. Ora, quindi ho detto qualcosa in tal senso in un video e, sai, ho visto di nuovo una sorta di estratti o estratti di alcuni dei miei video precedenti. さて、私はビデオでこの効果について何かを言いました、そして、あなたが知っているように、私は以前のビデオのいくつかの抜粋または抜粋を再び取り上げています。 Bem, eu disse algo nesse sentido em um vídeo e, você sabe, tenho tido uma espécie de trechos ou trechos de alguns dos meus vídeos anteriores apresentados novamente.

So this came up and then this generated this flurry of activity on Twitter. それでこれが思い浮かび、それからこれがツイッター上でこの活発な活動を生み出しました。 Então isso surgiu e gerou uma enxurrada de atividades no Twitter. Now, you know, and I can't remember what the wording was, but somebody sort of commented, you know, uh, I'm shocked that you would, uh, ignore these fine aspects of, uh, the culture. さて、あなたは知っています、そして私は言葉遣いが何であったかを思い出せません、しかし誰かがコメントした、あなたが知っている、ええと、私はあなたがええと、ええと、文化のこれらの素晴らしい側面を無視するだろうとショックを受けました。 Agora, você sabe, e eu não consigo me lembrar qual era o texto, mas alguém meio que comentou, você sabe, uh, estou chocado que você, uh, ignore esses bons aspectos da, uh, cultura. Um, many of the beginner words are tied up with these aspects of the culture. ええと、初心者の言葉の多くは、文化のこれらの側面と結びついています。 Hum, muitas das palavras para iniciantes estão ligadas a esses aspectos da cultura. Гм, многие слова для начинающих связаны с этими аспектами культуры.

And I said, well, give me some examples and the person didn't come back with any examples. そして、私は、まあ、私にいくつかの例を挙げてください、そしてその人は例を持って戻ってこなかったと言いました。 И я сказал, хорошо, дайте мне несколько примеров, и человек не вернулся ни с какими примерами. Other than to say that she was shocked that I was prepared to be rude in the language. 彼女は私がその言語で失礼になる準備ができていることにショックを受けたと言う以外に。 Além de dizer que ela ficou chocada por eu estar preparado para ser rude no idioma. Кроме того, чтобы сказать, что она была шокирована тем, что я был готов быть грубым в языке. Um, you know, I think there is a tendency when we learn a language where their culture is very different or even not so different, that we become over-sensitive to these cultural differences. It's not easy to offend people. Não é fácil ofender as pessoas. Людей обидеть не просто. It's not easy to be rude. 失礼になるのは簡単ではありません。 Нелегко быть грубым. Uh, just because we use the wrong word or the wrong degree of politeness or anything else. Просто потому, что мы используем неправильное слово или неправильную степень вежливости или что-то еще. If we are a beginner, first of all, when we're starting in the language, in my opinion, better off to focus on input. Se somos iniciantes, antes de mais nada, quando estamos começando na língua, na minha opinião, é melhor focarmos na entrada. Если мы новичок, в первую очередь, когда мы начинаем в языке, на мой взгляд, лучше сосредоточиться на вводе.

So you're just absorbing the language and you may notice that sometimes it's "vous" and sometimes it's "tu", for example, in French. Итак, вы просто впитываете язык и можете заметить, что иногда это «vous», а иногда «tu», например, во французском языке. Polite or familiar, not familiar and graduallywe get used to this and maybe we find an explanation somewhere and we kind of tuck that in the back of our minds. And then when we go to speak eventually a few months later, we start speaking.

We may get it wrong, but we won't offend anyone. Uh, any more than if someone who is a beginner in English speaks to us and uses the wrong word or says something wrong. I mean, unless they're swearing at us, we're not going to be offended. We won't necessarily consider the person rude. We might, we might find them silly. Мы можем, мы можем найти их глупыми.

I mean, there is plenty of opportunity when we speak a foreign language to come across as silly. つまり、私たちが外国語を話すとき、ばかげているように出くわす機会はたくさんあります。 Я имею в виду, что когда мы говорим на иностранном языке, есть много возможностей показаться глупыми. That comes with the territory. You have to be willing to sound less intelligent, uh, somewhat sillier than in your own language. Devi essere disposto a sembrare meno intelligente, uh, un po' più sciocco che nella tua lingua. あなたは自分の言語よりも少し賢くないように聞こえるのをいとわない必要があります。 That is something we have to accept if we're speaking a foreign language, but at the early stages, I think everything should be done to make it as easy as possible to get the language in you. So familiar situations, but here are these different words and here is how they say good morning, or here is how they say I'm going to work today or whatever it is. Very standard type, uh, words and situations. That's why our mini stories at LingQ are largely call them culturally neutral.

They're not completely culturally neutral. That's not possible. They were written by someone who, actually a Canadian woman who teaches English in Japan. So she's going to reflect that to some extent, but in many cultures of the world, we get up, we make breakfast, people go to work, uh, people might be cleaning their apartment or their house or any of the different situations that we have there are relatively, relatively cultural neutral. Так что она будет отражать это в какой-то степени, но во многих культурах мира мы встаем, готовим завтрак, люди идут на работу, ну, люди могут убирать свою квартиру или дом или в любой другой ситуации, которую мы есть относительно, относительно культурно нейтральные. They don't go into very culturally specific things in our mini stories. В наших мини-историях они не затрагивают очень специфические культурные особенности. Those are our existing 60 mini stories. Это наши существующие 60 мини-историй. I think it would be great to have some culturally specific mini stories so that the principle of the many stories, the repetition, the high-frequency verbs, we contain... we sort of maintain that, but we introduce things that are specific to Persian culture, which would be fine for me because I'm learning Persian or Arabic culture or uh, or, or France or China or Russia or Japan, so we can have those. Я думаю, было бы здорово иметь несколько культурно специфичных мини-историй, чтобы принцип множества историй, повторения, высокочастотных глаголов, которые мы содержали... Персидская культура, что было бы хорошо для меня, потому что я изучаю персидскую или арабскую культуру, или эм, или, или Францию, или Китай, или Россию, или Японию, так что мы можем их иметь. Uh, I think those are better later. Now, bare in mind, I'm talking about my personal perspective on this, of course, I eventually wanted to get into the cultural, uh, culturally specific things, and I want to choose those things that I find interesting.

And it may be that, uh, you know, Japanese cooking is what I'm interested in more so than say Japanese dance, for example, or I'm not interested in anime. We can choose those things that we're interested in, and that will inspire us further in our study. But if at an early stage, we don't get the degree of politeness correct in Korean or Japanese, that doesn't mean we won't be able to get it right later on. Но если на раннем этапе мы не можем правильно определить степень вежливости в корейском или японском языке, это не значит, что мы не сможем понять ее правильно позже. This is another thing, cause there's a number of exchanges here on Twitter and people implying well, you know, if you don't get it right at the beginning, you'll forever be speaking impolitely. これは別のことです。Twitterには多くのやり取りがあり、人々はよく示唆しています。最初から正しく理解していなければ、永遠に無礼に話していることになります。 Это другое дело, потому что здесь, в Твиттере, есть несколько обменов мнениями, и люди намекают, ну, знаете, если вы не поймете это правильно в начале, вы всегда будете говорить невежливо. That's not true. それは真実ではない。 Uh, there are any number of things that we get wrong at the early stage. О, есть множество вещей, в которых мы ошибаемся на ранней стадии.

From the tense to the person, to the gender to... and that doesn't mean that at some stage, because we've been listening and reading so much and becoming more and more familiar with the language at some stage, we'll get better and we'll get better with all of these aspects. От времени к лицу, к роду и... и это не значит, что на каком-то этапе, потому что мы так много слушали и читали и на каком-то этапе все больше и больше знакомились с языком, мы Станем лучше, и мы поправимся во всех этих аспектах. So I think the, this idea that you have to get, and it's a bit like, you know, a lot of the things that are typically introduced early on in, in these beginner books, including colors, for example, I have no capacity for absorbing seven colours, uh, in one lesson, uh, or all the numbers in one lesson. Uh, it's just part and parcel of all the things that will gradually be, be absorbed by the brain in due course, and ideally absorbed within content that we can cope with, that is relatively familiar. ええと、それは徐々になり、やがて脳に吸収され、理想的には私たちが対処できるコンテンツに吸収される、比較的馴染みのあるすべてのもののほんの一部です。 And, you know, words that repeat often and gradually we get better and as we build up, we pursue areas of interest or we get better. And we realize, actually, if you're talking about levels of politeness in Japanese and Chinese, we realize as we understand and hear better, what other people are saying. And we understand better in what situations, which words are used, which levels of politeness are used.

We then get better at doing that ourselves. Uh, and that's part of the reason why I'm very much against, uh, teaching slang because you, you also have to have a good sense of where slang is appropriate. Not to mention swear words which can be used at some point but are best avoided until we have a good sense of when to use them.

Similarly, the levels of politeness, we will eventually develop a feel for when to use them. And the idea that somehow people in other cultures are easily offended if we get things wrong, even though we know that we ourselves wouldn't be by someone getting similar things wrong, why would they be? そして、他の文化の人々は、私たちが同じようなことを間違えることによって私たち自身がそうではないことを知っていても、私たちが物事を間違えると簡単に気分を害するという考えは、なぜそうなるのでしょうか? I think there's sort of an over sensitivity to what we perceive to be more, you know, exotic cultures that we have to step very carefully, walk on eggshells.

I don't believe that. I think people are similar everywhere. They encourage you to learn the language. Not everyone, not everyone. There will be people who might be offended. There are people who have no patience sort of to deal with you. If you're learning their language and you butcher it, there's always those people, but the majority of people aren't that way. Se stai imparando la loro lingua e la macelli, ci sono sempre quelle persone, ma la maggior parte delle persone non è così.

So I just thought I would comment on that. So when you get started in the language, I say, go easy on the culture. You'll get to it eventually. And you'll find those things that interest you and, and presumably it's, uh, it's, uh, a general interest in the culture that has encouraged you sort of to learn the language, but it'll all come and do course you don't have to get it in the big enterprise.

So, that would be something that I've been engaging with people on Twitter. Quindi, sarebbe qualcosa con cui ho interagito con le persone su Twitter. Yani bu, Twitter'da insanlarla etkileşim kurduğum bir şey olabilir. And of course, Twitter is a very special kind of medium people tend to just say things without really having thought them through. Ve tabii ki Twitter, insanların üzerinde gerçekten düşünmeden bir şeyler söylemeye meyilli olduğu çok özel bir mecra. Uh, but it's, it's fun. It's... you get a sense of what some people are thinking, how representative they are.

It's hard to gauge because if you're in a particular silo, you'll get a lot of people commenting, reflecting a similar point of view that may not be very representative. Bunu ölçmek zordur çünkü belirli bir silodaysanız, çok fazla temsil edici olmayabilecek benzer bir bakış açısını yansıtan çok sayıda insan yorum yapacaktır. So, um, yeah, with that, the idea of culture, I've always been interested in culture, but not upfront. Yani, evet, kültür fikri, her zaman kültürle ilgilendim ama bunu açıkça söylemedim. And I leave you with a couple of videos that talk about getting started in a language and the role of culture.

Thank you for listening. Bye for now.