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Steve's Language Learning Tips, How I Would Teach Languages in a Classroom (1)

How I Would Teach Languages in a Classroom (1)

Kids that did well in school did well in French, but nobody

really learned to speak French.

Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here, and, and today I want to talk

about what I would do, how I would teach language in a classroom.

Uh, remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click

on the bell for notifications.

And, uh, if you follow me on a podcast service, uh, you

know, please leave a comment.

I do appreciate it.

So I'm gonna talk about teaching language, a language in a classroom,

which is something that I have essentially never done, but I'm gonna

begin by telling two little stories.

Uh, first of all, I remember very clearly that we had a teacher in high school who

was originally from the UK and this was in Montreal and, uh, we were learning French.

He was the French teacher.

And I can remember that when we would try to speak French in class, sometimes

he would preface that by saying "all right, you guys, now we're gonna talk

frog language", which is maybe funny, and people chuckled a bit but it really didn't

inspire much enthusiasm for what we were about to attempt to do, speak French.

And then the second thing I remember was when I was, uh, a student in France, I had

a job I used to go twice I think a week I would go to a French family for lunch

and I was paid and I was given a small amount and I was given a, a wonderful

meal, much better than the student restaurant fair that I was used to.

And my job was to speak English to the kids and the family.

There were, the parents were there and they had two kids.

They all come home for lunch and I was invited.

And so I'd finished my lunch with, uh, a couple of glasses

of wine that they would give me.

And then I would bicycle halfway across Paris to, uh, the Agricultural Institute.

... I don't know, actually called whatever it was.

And I had to run in there and I had to start this language lab.

So now we're talking about 1966/65.

Okay.

That's a long time ago.

And so here are all these aspiring, you know, French farmers, I

guess, that we're studying at the ... or whatever it's called.

And, uh, so, and they would be listening to stuff on their, they had these tape

recorders, so it was a big language lab.

So there was like a big room.

There were people sitting at their tape recorder, listening to this stuff.

I can't remember what my function was other than to turn it on, or if people had

questions, but mostly they just sat there.

And one of the guys at the back of the class, he took his big earphones off

he slammed them down on his desk and he said ... in other words, I've been

studying French or English for 10 years, and I still don't understand anything.

So that again, I remember that quite vividly, because it, it made me laugh.

I remember that they had stuff in the text that they were listening to terms

that I didn't even know in English like stubble mulch, stubble mulch tillage.

I remember stubble mulch tillage.

So that's kind of my experience with the classroom.

And I, I would say that in, um, in high school or in elementary school,

the French was most uninteresting and, uh, you know, kids that did well

in school did well in French, but nobody really learned to speak French.

Uh, when I got to university I've mentioned before I had this Dr.

Maurice Rabotan who was a great professor who got me motivated to learn French

really inspired me to learn French.

And then my French took off.

So if I were a teacher, uh, if I've envisioned the classroom.

So you can have a situation where the teacher is a native speaker.

You can have a situation where the teacher is not a native speaker but speaks the

language that he or she is teaching.

Well, you can have a situation where the teacher doesn't speak that language

well, and you could even have a situation where the teacher doesn't speak that

language at all today in the modern world of the internet and MP3 and so forth.

And so I don't think it really matters whether the teacher, uh, is fluent speaker

of the language or not better if he or she is, I think better if he or she is a

native speaker, because I think that is, is more inspirational for the learner that

they're learning the language from the person who has that culture, that language

in them, but it's not a condition.

And there are so many opportunities for the learner to hear the language,

first of all, obviously, to read anything they wanna read in the

language and also to hear the language via MP3 files, to discover content of

interest, even to connect with tutors and rooms could be organized not like

that language lab, uh, situation in France in 1965, but where you people

could have direct contact with tutors in the language that they're learning.

So the teacher needn't provide that.

The language the teacher to my mind is first and foremost is a motivator

like Maurice Rabotan motivated me to learn French with tremendous

consequences because I went to France, I became fluent in French.

I acquired that confidence that I can learn languages.

So he had a tremendous impact on my life.

But a teacher, you know, obviously because Mr.

Rabotan was French that was part of what inspired me, but I think a very

good teacher, very encouraging teacher can stimulate students and inspire them

and help them, even if the language that the student is trying to learn is

not the native language of the teacher.

I think we need to look at the language classroom.

Like if, if it were me, I would encourage, I would encourage my students

to listen and read, obviously, uh, I would encourage them to use uh, if I

were a teacher in a classroom, I could have 25 kids and I could set aside, you

know, a range of content, 20 stories that I know are suitable for them from

a number of different perspectives and they can choose whichever one they want.

And I would be able to follow how active they are, how much

they're reading, how much they're listening, how many LingQs they're

creating, how much they're writing.

Uh, I could organize for them to talk to look if I'm a native speaker, fine.

If I'm not, or if I'm not very fluent in that language, I can arrange for them

twice a week to have online contacts or maybe small group of them to have

online contacts with, uh, a teacher, a native speaker from the country.

Uh, and they could talk about things, uh, about the country or

about whatever the students are, uh, reading and listening to.

And I wouldn't have to create content all the time.

I wouldn't have to create lessons.

I wouldn't have to prepare like a lot of teachers spend a lot

of time preparing their lessons.

Uh, I could follow exactly what they're doing.

Also I wouldn't test them.

I would rely on keeping track of how active they are because I, as I've said

before, many times, what matters is how active are they with the language.

Some are gonna do better than others.

I don't want to discourage the ones that are, you know, don't pronounce

as well or don't they don't seem to do as well for whatever reason they

might start doing better later on.

So if they're struggling at an early stage, why would I discourage them?

Rather I would want to control, I'd wanna see how active they are

and if they're not very active, how do I make them more active?

Is it because the content is of no interest to them?

Uh, I'd have to try to find out with each of these students, if

possible is not always possible.

How do I motivate them to become more active?

The goal is to make them more active.

And so once you accept that the teacher doesn't have to bring

the language to the student.

So the teacher doesn't have to be native.

Doesn't even have to be proficient in the language.

It now opens up the possibility that many more schools can offer

languages which they now don't offer because they don't have an

accredited teacher in that language.

So you could offer five languages in the classroom and encourage them to

go off and study, or even sit in the classroom and listen and read right.

They're in the classroom.

Uh, if the classroom is only in one language, of course we can have

conversations in the classroom and the kids can talk about what they have been

reading and, uh, they can even talk about words that they've been saving,

that they don't fully understand, and other kids can comment on what they

think the word means and how it's used.

And we can have examples of how that word is used.

If everyone is studying the same language, it's much easier.

Uh, however, If in fact, some people in that classroom, you

know, don't wanna study French.

And I've said before in Canada, you know, it's like your civic obligation

to, to patriotic obligation.

If you're an English speaker, you gotta learn French, but maybe the

kid doesn't wanna learn French, but maybe he wants to learn Spanish or

he wants to learn Chinese or Russian.

So then if we can set it up so that maybe out of 25 kids 15 are gonna do

French, but another 10 are gonna study other languages of interest to them.

And we set it up so that they can do that.

And then of course, we have to come up with activities in the

classroom, which at the very least can be listening and reading.

The difficulty is if there's so many different languages, then

some of these activities would have to be again, solitary.

Uh, such as this, um, putting the sentences back together again,

that I'm now doing in beta, uh, at LingQ and we might devise

other activities for the kids.

Obviously it's easier if everyone is studying the same language, not ideal,

if you have, uh, different languages, but then we have to compare that to

the alternative, which is to sort of force people to learn a language

that they're not interested in.

Uh, because motivation is such a, an important part of language learning

that it was the case with me.

I think it's the case with most learners.

And we see the example in the Canadian English language, school system

where unmotivated kids learning French in fact, don't learn French.

So I think we have to strike a balance.

So it may not be, be ideal, but again, I'll be the first to admit that these

ideas may not be practical, but, um, I throw those out there as ideas.

If we look at where language instruction was in the sixties, when

I was learning French at school, or even when I was, or in the fifties,

I was learning French at school.

Or in the sixties when I was with these, uh, students learning, you know, at

the , as you recall, in, in France, so many things have changed the internet

MP3 technology and a whole bunch of other, uh, technologies and resources,

language, resources, and so forth.

So maybe the way languages are taught in schools will continue to evolve.

And perhaps some of the ideas that I've mentioned here may have some

relevance, uh, for the classroom.

And I will leave you with, uh, two older videos where I talk about the

How I Would Teach Languages in a Classroom (1) Wie ich Sprachen in einem Klassenzimmer unterrichten würde (1) Cómo enseñaría idiomas en un aula (1) 私ならどのように語学を教えるか (1) Como eu ensinaria línguas numa sala de aula (1) 我会如何在课堂上教授语文 (1) 我將如何在課堂上教授語言 (1)

Kids that did well in school did well in French, but nobody

really learned to speak French.

Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here, and, and today I want to talk

about what I would do, how I would teach language in a classroom.

Uh, remember if you enjoy these videos, please subscribe, click

on the bell for notifications.

And, uh, if you follow me on a podcast service, uh, you

know, please leave a comment.

I do appreciate it.

So I'm gonna talk about teaching language, a language in a classroom,

which is something that I have essentially never done, but I'm gonna

begin by telling two little stories.

Uh, first of all, I remember very clearly that we had a teacher in high school who

was originally from the UK and this was in Montreal and, uh, we were learning French.

He was the French teacher.

And I can remember that when we would try to speak French in class, sometimes

he would preface that by saying "all right, you guys, now we're gonna talk

frog language", which is maybe funny, and people chuckled a bit but it really didn't

inspire much enthusiasm for what we were about to attempt to do, speak French.

And then the second thing I remember was when I was, uh, a student in France, I had

a job I used to go twice I think a week I would go to a French family for lunch

and I was paid and I was given a small amount and I was given a, a wonderful

meal, much better than the student restaurant fair that I was used to.

And my job was to speak English to the kids and the family.

There were, the parents were there and they had two kids.

They all come home for lunch and I was invited.

And so I'd finished my lunch with, uh, a couple of glasses

of wine that they would give me.

And then I would bicycle halfway across Paris to, uh, the Agricultural Institute.

... I don't know, actually called whatever it was.

And I had to run in there and I had to start this language lab. Ich musste da reinrennen und dieses Sprachlabor eröffnen.

So now we're talking about 1966/65.

Okay.

That's a long time ago.

And so here are all these aspiring, you know, French farmers, I Und hier sind also all diese aufstrebenden französischen Landwirte, ich

guess, that we're studying at the ... or whatever it's called.

And, uh, so, and they would be listening to stuff on their, they had these tape

recorders, so it was a big language lab.

So there was like a big room.

There were people sitting at their tape recorder, listening to this stuff.

I can't remember what my function was other than to turn it on, or if people had

questions, but mostly they just sat there.

And one of the guys at the back of the class, he took his big earphones off

he slammed them down on his desk and he said ... in other words, I've been

studying French or English for 10 years, and I still don't understand anything.

So that again, I remember that quite vividly, because it, it made me laugh.

I remember that they had stuff in the text that they were listening to terms

that I didn't even know in English like stubble mulch, stubble mulch tillage.

I remember stubble mulch tillage.

So that's kind of my experience with the classroom.

And I, I would say that in, um, in high school or in elementary school,

the French was most uninteresting and, uh, you know, kids that did well

in school did well in French, but nobody really learned to speak French.

Uh, when I got to university I've mentioned before I had this Dr.

Maurice Rabotan who was a great professor who got me motivated to learn French

really inspired me to learn French.

And then my French took off.

So if I were a teacher, uh, if I've envisioned the classroom.

So you can have a situation where the teacher is a native speaker.

You can have a situation where the teacher is not a native speaker but speaks the

language that he or she is teaching. 彼または彼女が教えている言語。

Well, you can have a situation where the teacher doesn't speak that language そうですね、先生がその言語を話さないという状況もありえます。

well, and you could even have a situation where the teacher doesn't speak that 先生がそれを話さないという状況さえありえます

language at all today in the modern world of the internet and MP3 and so forth. 今日、インターネットや MP3 などの現代世界では、言語はまったく使用されていません。

And so I don't think it really matters whether the teacher, uh, is fluent speaker ですから、先生が流暢に話せるかどうかはあまり重要ではないと思います

of the language or not better if he or she is, I think better if he or she is a 彼または彼女が言語の

native speaker, because I think that is, is more inspirational for the learner that ネイティブ スピーカーの方が、学習者にとってよりインスピレーションを与えてくれると思います。

they're learning the language from the person who has that culture, that language 彼らはその文化、その言語を持っている人からその言語を学んでいます

in them, but it's not a condition. ありますが、条件ではありません。

And there are so many opportunities for the learner to hear the language, そして、学習者がその言語を聞く機会は非常に多く、

first of all, obviously, to read anything they wanna read in the まず第一に、明らかに、彼らが読みたいものを何でも読むために

language and also to hear the language via MP3 files, to discover content of MP3ファイルを介して言語を聞くこと、コンテンツを発見すること

interest, even to connect with tutors and rooms could be organized not like 興味があり、家庭教師と部屋を接続することさえ好きではありません

that language lab, uh, situation in France in 1965, but where you people 1965 年のフランスの言語ラボの状況ですが、

could have direct contact with tutors in the language that they're learning. 学習している言語でチューターと直接連絡を取ることができます。

So the teacher needn't provide that. ですから、先生はそれを提供する必要はありません。

The language the teacher to my mind is first and foremost is a motivator 何よりもまず、私の心にある先生の言語は動機です

like Maurice Rabotan motivated me to learn French with tremendous Maurice Rabotan のように、私はフランス語を学ぶように非常に大きな動機を与えられました。

consequences because I went to France, I became fluent in French. フランスに行ったので、フランス語が流暢になりました。

I acquired that confidence that I can learn languages. 私は言語を学べるという自信を手に入れました。

So he had a tremendous impact on my life. ですから、彼は私の人生に多大な影響を与えました。

But a teacher, you know, obviously because Mr. しかし、先生は、明らかにMr.

Rabotan was French that was part of what inspired me, but I think a very Rabotan はフランス人で、それが私のインスピレーションの一部でした。

good teacher, very encouraging teacher can stimulate students and inspire them 良い教師、非常に励みになる教師は、生徒を刺激し、刺激を与えることができます

and help them, even if the language that the student is trying to learn is たとえ生徒が学ぼうとしている言語が

not the native language of the teacher. 先生の母国語ではありません。

I think we need to look at the language classroom. 語学教室に目を向ける必要があると思います。

Like if, if it were me, I would encourage, I would encourage my students もしそれが私だったら、励まし、生徒たちを励ますでしょう

to listen and read, obviously, uh, I would encourage them to use uh, if I 聞いたり読んだりするには、明らかに、ええと、私が

were a teacher in a classroom, I could have 25 kids and I could set aside, you 教室の教師だったら、25 人の子供を育てることができました。

know, a range of content, 20 stories that I know are suitable for them from 知っている、さまざまなコンテンツ、それらに適していると私が知っている20のストーリー

a number of different perspectives and they can choose whichever one they want. 多数の異なる視点があり、好きな方を選択できます。

And I would be able to follow how active they are, how much そして、私は彼らがどれだけ活動的であるか、どれだけ活動しているかを追跡することができます

they're reading, how much they're listening, how many LingQs they're 彼らが読んでいる、どれだけ聞いているか、LingQ をいくつ持っているか

creating, how much they're writing. 作成、彼らが書いている量。

Uh, I could organize for them to talk to look if I'm a native speaker, fine. ええと、私がネイティブスピーカーなら、彼らが話すように手配することができます。

If I'm not, or if I'm not very fluent in that language, I can arrange for them そうでない場合、またはその言語に堪能でない場合は、手配できます

twice a week to have online contacts or maybe small group of them to have 週に 2 回、オンラインで連絡を取るか、少人数のグループで連絡を取ります。

online contacts with, uh, a teacher, a native speaker from the country. その国のネイティブスピーカーである教師とのオンライン連絡先。

Uh, and they could talk about things, uh, about the country or ええと、彼らは国のことや、

about whatever the students are, uh, reading and listening to. 生徒が何を読んでいるのか、何を聞いているのかについてです。

And I wouldn't have to create content all the time. そして、常にコンテンツを作成する必要はありません。

I wouldn't have to create lessons. レッスンを作成する必要はありません。

I wouldn't have to prepare like a lot of teachers spend a lot 多くの教師が多額の費用をかけて準備する必要はありません

of time preparing their lessons. レッスンの準備に時間をかけます。

Uh, I could follow exactly what they're doing. ええと、私は彼らが何をしているかを正確に追うことができました。

Also I wouldn't test them. また、私はそれらをテストしません。

I would rely on keeping track of how active they are because I, as I've said 私が言ったように、私は彼らがどれほど活動的であるかを追跡することに頼っています

before, many times, what matters is how active are they with the language. 以前は、多くの場合、問題は言語に対してどれだけ積極的に取り組んでいるかです。

Some are gonna do better than others. あるものは他のものよりうまくいくでしょう。

I don't want to discourage the ones that are, you know, don't pronounce 発音しない人を落胆させたくありません

as well or don't they don't seem to do as well for whatever reason they 彼らは何らかの理由でうまくやっていないようです

might start doing better later on. 後でうまくいくかもしれません。

So if they're struggling at an early stage, why would I discourage them? では、彼らが初期の段階で苦労しているのなら、なぜ彼らを落胆させるのでしょうか?

Rather I would want to control, I'd wanna see how active they are むしろ支配したい 活動してみたい

and if they're not very active, how do I make them more active? また、あまり活動的でない場合は、どうすればより活動的になるでしょうか?

Is it because the content is of no interest to them? 内容に興味がないからでしょうか。

Uh, I'd have to try to find out with each of these students, if ええと、私はこれらの学生のそれぞれと一緒に見つけようとしなければならないでしょう.

possible is not always possible. 常に可能であるとは限りません。

How do I motivate them to become more active? 彼らがもっと活動的になるように動機付けるにはどうすればよいでしょうか?

The goal is to make them more active. 目標は、それらをよりアクティブにすることです。

And so once you accept that the teacher doesn't have to bring ですから、先生が持ってくる必要がないことを受け入れたら、

the language to the student. 学生への言語。

So the teacher doesn't have to be native. だから先生はネイティブである必要はありません。

Doesn't even have to be proficient in the language. 言語に堪能である必要さえありません。

It now opens up the possibility that many more schools can offer 今では、より多くの学校が提供できる可能性が開かれています

languages which they now don't offer because they don't have an 彼らが持っていないために現在提供していない言語

accredited teacher in that language. その言語の認定教師。

So you could offer five languages in the classroom and encourage them to 教室で 5 つの言語を提供し、

go off and study, or even sit in the classroom and listen and read right.

They're in the classroom. 彼らは教室にいます。

Uh, if the classroom is only in one language, of course we can have ええと、教室が 1 つの言語だけである場合は、もちろん

conversations in the classroom and the kids can talk about what they have been 教室での会話と子供たちは自分が何をしてきたかについて話すことができます

reading and, uh, they can even talk about words that they've been saving, 読んだり、えーと、彼らは保存してきた単語について話すことさえできます。

that they don't fully understand, and other kids can comment on what they 彼らが完全に理解していないこと、および他の子供たちが彼らが何についてコメントすることができます

think the word means and how it's used. 言葉の意味と使い方を考える

And we can have examples of how that word is used. そして、その言葉がどのように使われているかの例を見ることができます。

If everyone is studying the same language, it's much easier. 全員が同じ言語を勉強していれば、ずっと簡単です。

Uh, however, If in fact, some people in that classroom, you ええと、しかし、もし実際にその教室に何人かの人々がいるなら、あなたは

know, don't wanna study French.

And I've said before in Canada, you know, it's like your civic obligation

to, to patriotic obligation.

If you're an English speaker, you gotta learn French, but maybe the

kid doesn't wanna learn French, but maybe he wants to learn Spanish or

he wants to learn Chinese or Russian.

So then if we can set it up so that maybe out of 25 kids 15 are gonna do

French, but another 10 are gonna study other languages of interest to them.

And we set it up so that they can do that.

And then of course, we have to come up with activities in the

classroom, which at the very least can be listening and reading.

The difficulty is if there's so many different languages, then

some of these activities would have to be again, solitary.

Uh, such as this, um, putting the sentences back together again,

that I'm now doing in beta, uh, at LingQ and we might devise

other activities for the kids.

Obviously it's easier if everyone is studying the same language, not ideal,

if you have, uh, different languages, but then we have to compare that to

the alternative, which is to sort of force people to learn a language

that they're not interested in.

Uh, because motivation is such a, an important part of language learning

that it was the case with me.

I think it's the case with most learners.

And we see the example in the Canadian English language, school system

where unmotivated kids learning French in fact, don't learn French.

So I think we have to strike a balance.

So it may not be, be ideal, but again, I'll be the first to admit that these

ideas may not be practical, but, um, I throw those out there as ideas.

If we look at where language instruction was in the sixties, when

I was learning French at school, or even when I was, or in the fifties,

I was learning French at school.

Or in the sixties when I was with these, uh, students learning, you know, at

the , as you recall, in, in France, so many things have changed the internet

MP3 technology and a whole bunch of other, uh, technologies and resources,

language, resources, and so forth.

So maybe the way languages are taught in schools will continue to evolve.

And perhaps some of the ideas that I've mentioned here may have some

relevance, uh, for the classroom.

And I will leave you with, uh, two older videos where I talk about the