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Brains On! Podcast, Do insects see the world in slow motion? (1)

Do insects see the world in slow motion? (1)

Roslyn: You're listening to Brains On. Where we're serious about being curious.

Voice: Brains On is funded in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation

[Theme music]

Molly: In today's episode, we're getting into all about how animals can see the world around them…

(music slows down and everything powers off)

Molly: Sigh. That's the third time we've lost power this week. What is going on!? Well -- Our switch for the backup generator is somewhere in here… (rustling around)

Roslyn: Do you think the experimental colony of blue iguanas is napping on the rooftop solar panels again?

Molly: Maybe! The iguanas do love the Brains On headquarters solar set up. It's also possible that Marc and Sanden are replacing the wind turbine blades…

Roslyn: They did mention decorating the turbines with sea shells - so when they spun we'd hear the ocean.

Molly: (rustling as if rummaging around) Roslyn, do you see a label that says ‘GENNY' anywhere?

Roslyn: Not yet. Who's Genny?

Molly: Sanden can only do maintenance work if the thing he's working on has a name and a plant nearby. The generator is named Genny, and there's a potted Queen of the night cactus next to it.

HAWKMOTH: Did HAWKMOTH hear someone say… queen of the night cactus blossom?

Molly: Who's that? !

HAWKMOTH: HAWKMOTH is here.

Roslyn: Hi… uh, Hawkmoth? Where did you come from? ?

HAWKMOTH: HAWKMOTH is….generally… around. But HAWKMOTH is HERE for Queen of the night blossoms. (wings flapping)

Molly: Do insects always refer to themselves in third person?

HAWKMOTH. Not all of them. But not all of them are named HAWKMOTH.

Roslyn: Fair point

HAWKMOTH: (wings flapping) Aaaaaand Ah. Here's that queen of the night. Good thing you have the lights off — this sweet and juicy delicacy only blooms at night, mmmm. (slurping)

Roslyn: How did you find that cactus flower...so fast? ?

HAWKMOTH: HAWKMOTH is way better at seeing in the dark than you humans! HAWKMOTH actually slows its brain down a little to take in more light when it's dark, to help HAWKMOTH see better. Nothing crazy, but a human wouldn't understand. (slurp slurp)

Molly: Oh wow. And here's Genny's switch, too. Thanks for your help, HAWKMOTH.

HAWKMOTH: Wait wait wait let me get one more sip before you turn those awful lights back off. Queen of the night blossoms and HAWKMOTH are both VERY nocturnal.

Molly: As nice as it is to meet you, HAWKMOTH, we do have to get back to taping the show — so you know, let us know when you've had your fill, ok? (straw sucking to empty noise)

HAWKMOTH: OK. HAWKMOTH is satisfied. Carry on.

(Switch, then power up)

[THEME music]

Molly: You're listening to Brains On from American Public Media, I'm Molly Bloom and I'm here today with Roslyn from Duluth, Minnesota. Hi, Roslyn!

Roslyn: Hi!

Molly: Today we're talking about how animals see the world, because you sent in a great question about this. Do you remember the question you sent?

Roslyn: Do insects see things slower than we do or faster?

Molly: What made you curious about that?

Roslyn: Well, I was actually watching a film where they had people who were walking slower and then were tiny people who were walking faster and it was, I don't know, it got me interested.

Molly: So you were thinking if you're a tiny insect do you see people slower just like the tiny humans in that movie?

Roslyn: Yeah!

Molly: That inspired us to look into the wild world of animal vision. And you're not the only one who wondered about how animals see the world.

Maya: Hi Brains On! I'm Maya and I was wondering why do we see different colors than animals?

Finja: My name is Finja and my question is do animals see the same rainbow we do and if not how is it different?

Silas: My name is Silas and I'm from Fairbanks, Alaska and my question is how do some animals see heat?

Zoya: Hi my name is Zoya.

Quinn: Hi my name is Quinn.

Zoya: Our question is why do we see colors that some animals can't see?

Harriet: Hi my name is Harriet and I'm from Ohio. My question is how can eagles and other birds see from so far away?

Molly: Before we get into animal eyeballs, let's talk a little bit about how we see the world.

Roslyn: Our brain builds a picture of the world from the light that our eyes take in.

Molly: Two kinds of cells at the back of your eye tell your brain what light is coming in. One is called a rod and the other is called a cone.

Roslyn: Rods are great for seeing in low light and cones tell your brain about color.

Molly: Rod and cone -- they kinda sound like a TV sitcom duo.

[Cheesy Music]

Voice: Rod and Cone! Friends in your eyeholes!

They're seeing the world

Sensing the light

Cone's good at color

And Rod's for low light! Yeah!

Rod: We're friends.

Cone: You got that right, buddy. High five!

Roslyn: I'd watch that with my rods and cones.

Molly: Same. So, speaking of cones -- most people have three kinds -- ones that sense blue, ones that sense green and ones that sense red. And those cones combine to help us see a lot of different colors.

Roslyn: By the way — people who are colorblind might have fewer cones, or their cones might not work as well, which makes it harder for them to tell colors apart. But even people with the usual number of cones can't see all the light in the world.

Molly: That's because light can travel in a wide range of energy levels. Our eyes can only detect a tiny fraction of it. Just a very specific range.

Roslyn: It's similar to hearing -- you know how you can hear this tone?

[TONE starts medium then goes up in pitch until it's impossible to hear]

Roslyn: But as it gets higher and higher in pitch ---- it gets harder and harder to hear. Until -- it's gone!

Molly: The tone is still there - we just can't hear it anymore. Our ears aren't equipped. But other animals might be able to hear it.

Dog: Woof woof!

Roslyn: Like dogs. They have good ears. Cute fluffy good ears.

Dog: Woof.

Molly: It's similar with light. All the light we see is only part of the light out there. We call that visible light. But there's light that's much lower in energy - like radio waves and microwaves.

Roslyn: Which we can't see. (wah wah)

Molly: Then there's light that's much higher in energy - like ultraviolet waves or gamma waves.

Roslyn: Which we also can't see. (wah wah)

Molly: We call this entire range of light -- the electromagnetic spectrum! It's so cool and important, we wrote a song to help you remember it. The waves go in order from lowest energy to highest energy. Hit it singers!

[music]

Singers:

Radio

Microwave

Infrared

Visible

Ultraviolet

Xray

Gamma

Yeah, here we go

Space between waves gets shorter and shorter

Electromagnetic spectrum that's the order

Radio

Microwave

Infrared

Visible

Ultraviolet

Xray

Gamma

It's the electromagnetic spectrum

The electromagnetic spectrum

These are the facts we checked em

The electromagnetic spectrum

Molly: So lovely.

Roslyn: And informative.

Molly: Exactly. Now, we can't see things outside the visible spectrum -- but some animals can!

And they… have some feelings about it. We checked out an animal vision support group to hear more about that.

(murmury talking, some shuffling)

Mal the Mantis: Ahem, Welcome to the Eyes Wider Open support group. Here, we can all share what it's like to see the world, through our eyes. If we haven't, ahem, SEEN you here before, heh heh, welcome.

(groans)

Monty the Mantis: OK, OK, some of you are tired of my little joke. Thank you for that feedback. I wanna kick off with intros. So I'll start. I'm Mal, I'm a mantis shrimp. I can see ultraviolet light, and I have a bunch of different color sensing cells, but scientists don't think I'm great at telling colors apart. And I'm still processing that.

Cecily Snake: I'm Cecily. I'm a pit viper and I'm amazing. I see a heat map of whatever I'm looking at.

Caleb Caribou: I'm Caleb, I'm a caribou, and I have really big eyeballs that can see ultraviolet light, like Mal. That makes my world much brighter.

Landry Lab: (pants) Hi, I'm Landry. (pants) I'm a yellow lab. My eyes have two kinds of cone cells. So I can tell blue and yellowish stuff apart pretty well. But the other colors are a bit mushy.

Bo Bluebottle: And I'm Bo. I'm a bluebottle butterfly. I have exquisite color vision. Like Caleb and Mal, I also see UV.

Mal: Wow. Great. Thank you all so much. So who'd like to start today?

Cecily Snake: I'll sssstart.

Mal: Thanks, Cecily.

Cecily Snake: So you know, pit vipers have these two pit organs on our faces, see— they look like second nostrils, but bigger. They help me ssssseeeee in a different way. My pit organs sense heat. My eyes see what's around me. And my brain puts the two together.

Mal: Fascinating. How do you feel about that?

Cecily Snake: Ugh. Well, for one thing, I'm tired of getting here, and looking at the coffee, and seeing that it's cold. The coffee here is never hot and it's ssssso uncivilized that you all just keep eating and drinking lukewarm stuff. If you had any decent snacks, I'd spot them right away! Would it kill you to put a warm mouse on the snack table every once in a while

Mal the Mantis: Good note, thank you for sharing, Cecily. I'll going to pass your snack request on. Who'd like to share next?

Caleb Caribou: I can. You know, I'm just feeling a little misunderstood. Like, no offense Mal and Bo, but everyone gets why bugs and shrimps use their UV vision to find friends and food. But they just don't get me.

Mal the Mantis: Wow, Caleb. That sounds really hard. Can you say more?

Caleb Caribou: Well, seeing UV light helps me tell important things apart, too! Snow vs. lichen vs. a hungry wolf, for instance. It's extra helpful to let more light into my eyes in the dark arctic winter, when my world is a deep, deep blue. But also, UV vision highlights urine. So, I knew not to sit in the chair that Landry marked, for instance.

Landry the Lab: (pants) Couldn't help myself! Apologies!

Mal the Mantis: So expressive, Landry. Thank you. And thanks for sharing Caleb. Bo -- you haven't shared for a while. (fades out)

Molly: Okay, let's give our eyes a rest and instead - activate our ears. It's time for the

Whisper: Mystery Sound!

Molly: Here it is.

(Plays sound)

Molly: What is your guess?

Roslyn: I think it's some sort of seal, maybe a sea gull?

Molly: A seal or a seagull, excellent guess. We're gonna hear it again and be back with the answer in just a little bit.

[music]

Molly: We're working on an episode about our favorite kind of suit.

Roslyn: Swimsuits?

Molly: Even cooler -- spacesuits! These technological wonders let humans survive in the cold, harsh and otherwise deadly vacuum of space.

Roslyn: Yeah, swimsuits definitely can't do that.

Molly: Of course, we humans make all kinds of special suits -- ones that let us dive deep underwater, ones that protect firefighters from flames -- even ones that can camouflage us so we blend in with nature. So Roslyn -- if you could have a special suit that could help you with some task - any task -- what would it do?

Roslyn: Possibly a bike maintenance suit?

Molly: Ooh. Tell me more.

Roslyn: It would have all the things I'd need to fix my bike if, say, my tire popped.

Molly: That would be useful.

Roslyn: Yes it would.

Molly: What color would you want it to be?


Do insects see the world in slow motion? (1) Czy owady widzą świat w zwolnionym tempie? (1)

Roslyn: You're listening to Brains On. Roslyn: Słuchasz Brains On. Where we're serious about being curious. Gdzie poważnie myślimy o ciekawości.

Voice: Brains On is funded in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation 声音:Brains On 的部分资金来自美国国家科学基金会的资助

[Theme music]

Molly: In today's episode, we're getting into all about how animals can see the world around them… Molly: W dzisiejszym odcinku zagłębimy się w to, jak zwierzęta widzą otaczający ich świat…

(music slows down and everything powers off) (muzyka zwalnia i wszystko się wyłącza) (音乐变慢,一切都关闭了)

Molly: Sigh. Molly: Westchnienie. 莫莉:叹气。 That's the third time we've lost power this week. To już trzeci raz, kiedy tracimy moc w tym tygodniu. What is going __on!__? Well -- Our switch for the backup generator is somewhere in here… (rustling around) Cóż... Nasz przełącznik do zapasowego generatora jest gdzieś tutaj... (szeleszcząc) 嗯——我们的备用发电机开关就在这里……(沙沙作响)

Roslyn: Do you think the experimental colony of blue iguanas is napping on the rooftop solar panels again? Roslyn: Czy uważasz, że eksperymentalna kolonia niebieskich legwanów znów drzemie na panelach słonecznych na dachu? 罗斯林:你认为蓝鬣蜥的实验群体又在屋顶的太阳能电池板上打盹了吗?

Molly: Maybe! The iguanas do love the Brains On headquarters solar set up. Legwany uwielbiają instalację solarną w siedzibie głównej Brains On. 鬣蜥确实喜欢 Brains On 总部太阳能装置。 It's also possible that Marc and Sanden are replacing the wind turbine blades… Możliwe też, że Marc i Sanden wymieniają łopaty turbin wiatrowych… Marc 和 Sanden 也有可能正在更换风力涡轮机叶片……

Roslyn: They did mention decorating the turbines with sea shells - so when they spun we'd hear the ocean. Roslyn: Wspominali o ozdobieniu turbin muszlami morskimi - więc kiedy wirowali, słyszeliśmy ocean. Roslyn:他们确实提到用贝壳装饰涡轮机——所以当它们旋转时,我们会听到海洋的声音。

Molly: (rustling as if rummaging around) Roslyn, do you see a  label that says ‘GENNY' anywhere? 莫莉:(沙沙作响,好像在四处翻找)罗斯林,你有没有在任何地方看到一个写着“GENNY”的标签?

Roslyn: Not yet. Who's Genny?

Molly: Sanden can only do maintenance work if the thing he's working on has a name and a plant nearby. Molly: Sanden może wykonywać prace konserwacyjne tylko wtedy, gdy rzecz, nad którą pracuje, ma nazwę i zakład w pobliżu. 莫莉:桑登只有在他工作的东西有名字和附近有植物的情况下才能做维修工作。 The generator is named Genny, and there's a potted Queen of the night cactus next to it. Generator nazywa się Genny, a obok niego znajduje się doniczkowa królowa nocy kaktus. 发电机名叫Genny,旁边有一个盆栽夜仙人掌女王。

HAWKMOTH: Did HAWKMOTH hear someone say… queen of the night cactus blossom? HAWKMOTH: Czy HAWKMOTH słyszał, jak ktoś mówił… królowa nocnego rozkwitu kaktusa? HAWKMOTH:HAWKMOTH有没有听到有人说……仙人掌开花的夜皇后?

Molly: Who's that? !

HAWKMOTH: HAWKMOTH is here.

Roslyn: Hi… uh, Hawkmoth? Where did you come from? ?

HAWKMOTH: HAWKMOTH is….generally… around. HAWKMOTH:HAWKMOTH 是……一般……在附近。 But HAWKMOTH is HERE for Queen of the night blossoms. (wings flapping) (翅膀扇动)

Molly: Do insects always refer to themselves in third person? 莫莉:昆虫总是以第三人称称呼自己吗?

HAWKMOTH. Not all of them. But not all of them are named HAWKMOTH.

Roslyn: Fair point 罗斯林:公平点

HAWKMOTH: (wings flapping) Aaaaaand Ah. Here's that queen of the night. 这是夜的女王。 Good thing you have the lights off — this sweet and juicy delicacy only blooms at night, mmmm. 幸好你把灯关了——这种甜美多汁的美味只在晚上开花,嗯。 (slurping)

Roslyn: How did you find that cactus flower...so fast? 罗斯林:你是怎么找到仙人掌花的……这么快? ?

HAWKMOTH: HAWKMOTH is way better at seeing in the dark than you humans! HAWKMOTH actually slows its brain down a little to take in more light when it's dark, to help HAWKMOTH see better. HAWKMOTH 实际上会稍微放慢它的大脑,以便在天黑时吸收更多的光线,以帮助 HAWKMOTH 看得更清楚。 Nothing crazy, but a human wouldn't understand. (slurp slurp)

Molly: Oh wow. And here's Genny's switch, too. 这也是 Genny 的开关。 Thanks for your help, HAWKMOTH.

HAWKMOTH: Wait wait wait let me get one more sip before you turn those awful lights back off. Queen of the night blossoms and HAWKMOTH are both VERY nocturnal.

Molly: As nice as it is to meet you, HAWKMOTH, we do have to get back to taping the show — so you know, let us know when you've had your fill, ok? 莫莉:很高兴见到你,HAWKMOTH,我们确实得回去录制节目了——所以你知道,等你吃饱了再告诉我们,好吗? (straw sucking to empty noise)

HAWKMOTH: OK. HAWKMOTH is satisfied. Carry on. 继续。

(Switch, then  power up)

[THEME music]

Molly: You're listening to Brains On from American Public Media, I'm Molly Bloom and I'm here today with Roslyn from Duluth, Minnesota. Hi, Roslyn!

Roslyn: Hi!

Molly: Today we're talking about how animals see the world, because you sent in a great question about this. Do you remember the question you sent?

Roslyn: Do insects see things slower than we do or faster?

Molly: What made you curious about that?

Roslyn: Well, I was actually watching a film where they had people who were walking slower and then were tiny people who were walking faster and it was, I don't know, it got me interested. 罗斯林:嗯,我实际上是在看一部电影,里面有一些走得慢的人,然后是走得更快的小人,我不知道,这让我很感兴趣。

Molly:  So you were thinking if you're a tiny insect do you see people slower just like the tiny humans in that movie?

Roslyn: Yeah!

Molly: That inspired us to look into the wild world of animal vision. And you're not the only one who wondered about how animals see the world.

Maya: Hi Brains On! I'm Maya and I was wondering why do we see different colors than animals?

Finja: My name is Finja and my question is do animals see the same rainbow we do and if not how is it different? Finja:我的名字是 Finja,我的问题是动物看到的彩虹和我们看到的一样吗?如果没有,那有什么不同?

Silas: My name is Silas and I'm from Fairbanks, Alaska and my question is how do some animals see heat? 赛拉斯:我叫赛拉斯,来自阿拉斯加的费尔班克斯,我的问题是有些动物是如何看到热量的?

Zoya: Hi my name is Zoya.

Quinn: Hi my name is Quinn.

Zoya: Our question is why do we see colors that some animals can't see? Zoya:我们的问题是为什么我们会看到一些动物看不到的颜色?

Harriet: Hi my name is Harriet and I'm from Ohio. My question is how can eagles and other birds see from so far away?

Molly: Before we get into animal eyeballs, let's talk a little bit about how we see the world. 莫莉:在我们进入动物眼球之前,让我们先谈谈我们如何看待这个世界。

Roslyn: Our brain builds a picture of the world from the light that our eyes take in. Roslyn:我们的大脑根据我们眼睛所接收到的光构建了一幅世界图景。

Molly: Two kinds of cells at the back of your eye tell your brain what light is coming in. One is called a rod and the other is called a cone. 一个称为杆,另一个称为锥。

Roslyn: Rods are great for seeing in low light and cones tell your brain about color.

Molly: Rod and cone -- they kinda sound like a TV sitcom duo. 莫莉:棒和锥——听起来有点像电视情景喜剧二重奏。

[Cheesy Music] [俗气的音乐]

Voice: Rod and Cone! Friends in your eyeholes!

__They're seeing the world

Sensing the light 感知光线

Cone's good at color

And Rod's for low light! Yeah!__

Rod: We're friends.

Cone: You got that right, buddy. High five!

Roslyn: I'd watch that with my rods and cones. Roslyn:我会用我的视杆和视锥来观察。

Molly: Same. So, speaking of cones -- most people have three kinds -- ones that sense blue, ones that sense green and ones that sense red. And those cones combine to help us see a lot of different colors.

Roslyn: By the way — people who are colorblind might have fewer cones, or their cones might not work as well, which makes it harder for them to tell colors apart. 罗斯林:顺便说一下——色盲的人可能有更少的视锥细胞,或者他们的视锥细胞可能效果不佳,这使得他们更难区分颜色。 But even people with the usual number of cones can't see all the light in the world.

Molly: That's because light can travel in a wide range of energy levels. 莫莉:那是因为光可以在很宽的能级范围内传播。 Our eyes can only detect a tiny fraction of it. 我们的眼睛只能检测到其中的一小部分。 Just a very specific range.

Roslyn: It's similar to hearing -- you know how you can hear this tone?

[TONE starts medium then goes up in pitch until it's impossible to hear] [TONE 开始中等,然后调高直到听不见]

Roslyn: But as it gets higher and higher in pitch ---- it gets harder and harder to hear. Until -- it's gone!

Molly: The tone is still there - we just can't hear it anymore. Our ears aren't equipped. 我们的耳朵没有装备。 But other animals might be able to hear it.

Dog: Woof woof!

Roslyn: Like dogs. They have good ears. Cute fluffy good ears. 可爱的毛茸茸的好耳朵。

Dog: Woof.

Molly: It's similar with light. All the light we see is only part of the light out there. 我们看到的所有光都只是外面光的一部分。 We call that visible light. But there's light that's much lower in energy - like radio waves and microwaves. 但是有些光的能量要低得多——比如无线电波和微波。

Roslyn: Which we can't see. (wah wah)

Molly: Then there's light that's much higher in energy - like ultraviolet waves or gamma waves. 莫莉:还有能量更高的光——比如紫外线波或伽马波。

Roslyn: Which we also can't see. (wah wah)

Molly: We call this entire range of light -- the electromagnetic spectrum! 莫莉:我们把这整个范围的光称为电磁光谱! It's so cool and important, we wrote a song to help you remember it. The waves go in order from lowest energy to highest energy. Hit it singers! 打它的歌手!

[music]

Singers:

__Radio 收音机

Microwave 微波

Infrared 红外线的

Visible 可见的

Ultraviolet

Xray

Gamma

Yeah, here we go

Space between waves gets shorter and shorter

Electromagnetic spectrum that's the order

Radio

Microwave

Infrared

Visible

Ultraviolet

Xray

Gamma

It's the electromagnetic spectrum

The electromagnetic spectrum

These are the facts we checked em

The electromagnetic spectrum__

Molly: So lovely.

Roslyn: And informative.

Molly: Exactly. Now, we can't see things outside the visible spectrum -- but some animals can!

And they… have some feelings about it. We checked out an animal vision support group to hear more about that.

(murmury talking, some shuffling)

Mal the Mantis: Ahem, Welcome to the Eyes Wider Open support group. Here, we can all share what it's like to see the world, through our eyes. If we haven't, ahem, SEEN you here before, heh heh, welcome.

(groans)

Monty the Mantis: OK, OK, some of you are tired of my little joke. Thank you for that feedback. I wanna kick off with intros. So I'll start. I'm Mal, I'm a mantis shrimp. I can see ultraviolet light, and I have a bunch of different color sensing cells, but scientists don't think I'm great at telling colors apart. 我可以看到紫外线,我有一堆不同的颜色感应细胞,但科学家们认为我不擅长区分颜色。 And I'm still processing that. 我还在处理那个。

Cecily Snake: I'm Cecily. I'm a pit viper and I'm amazing. 我是一条蝮蛇,我很了不起。 I see a heat map of whatever I'm looking at. 我看到了我正在查看的任何内容的热图。

Caleb Caribou: I'm Caleb, I'm a caribou, and I have really big eyeballs that can see ultraviolet light, like Mal. That makes my world much brighter.

Landry Lab: (pants) Hi, I'm Landry. (pants) I'm a yellow lab. My eyes have two kinds of cone cells. So I can tell blue and yellowish stuff apart pretty well. 所以我可以很好地区分蓝色和黄色的东西。 But the other colors are a bit mushy.

Bo Bluebottle: And I'm Bo. I'm a bluebottle butterfly. 我是一只蓝瓶蝴蝶。 I have exquisite color vision. 我有精致的色觉。 Like Caleb and Mal, I also see UV.

Mal: Wow. Great. Thank you all so much. So who'd like to start today?

Cecily Snake: I'll sssstart.

Mal: Thanks, Cecily.

Cecily Snake: So you know, pit vipers have these two pit organs on our faces, see— they look like second nostrils, but bigger. They help me ssssseeeee in a different way. My pit organs sense heat. My eyes see what's around me. And my brain puts the two together.

Mal: Fascinating. How do you feel about that?

Cecily Snake: Ugh. Well, for one thing, I'm __tired__ of getting here, and looking at the coffee, and seeing that it's cold. The coffee here is never hot and it's ssssso uncivilized that you all just keep eating and drinking lukewarm stuff. If you had any decent snacks, I'd spot them right away! Would it kill you to put a warm mouse on the snack table every once in a while

Mal the Mantis: Good note, thank you for sharing, Cecily. I'll going to pass your snack request on. Who'd like to share next?

Caleb Caribou: I can. You know, I'm just feeling a little misunderstood. Like, no offense Mal and Bo, but everyone gets why bugs and shrimps use their UV vision to find friends and food. But they just don't get me.

Mal the Mantis: Wow, Caleb. That sounds really hard. Can you say more?

Caleb Caribou: Well, seeing UV light helps me tell important things apart, too! Snow vs. lichen vs. a hungry wolf, for instance. It's extra helpful to let more light into my eyes in the dark arctic winter, when my world is a deep, deep blue. But also, UV vision highlights urine. So, I knew not to sit in the chair that Landry marked, for instance.

Landry the Lab: (pants) Couldn't help myself! Apologies!

Mal the Mantis: So expressive, Landry. Thank you. And thanks for sharing Caleb. Bo -- you haven't shared for a while. (fades out)

Molly: Okay, let's give our eyes a rest and instead - activate our ears. It's time for the

Whisper: Mystery Sound!

Molly: Here it is.

(Plays sound)

Molly: What is your guess?

Roslyn: I think it's some sort of seal, maybe a sea gull?

Molly: A seal or a seagull, excellent guess. We're gonna hear it again and be back with the answer in just a little bit.

[music]

Molly: We're working on an episode about our favorite kind of suit.

Roslyn: Swimsuits?

Molly: Even cooler -- spacesuits! These technological wonders let humans survive in the cold, harsh and otherwise deadly vacuum of space.

Roslyn: Yeah, swimsuits definitely can't do that.

Molly: Of course, we humans make all kinds of special suits -- ones that let us dive deep underwater, ones that protect firefighters from flames -- even ones that can camouflage us so we blend in with nature. So Roslyn -- if you could have a special suit that could help you with some task - any task -- what would it do?

Roslyn: Possibly a bike maintenance suit?

Molly: Ooh. Tell me more.

Roslyn: It would have all the things I'd need to fix my bike if, say, my tire popped.

Molly: That would be useful.

Roslyn: Yes it would.

Molly: What color would you want it to be?