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Brains On! Podcast, Angry: All about feelings (3)

Angry: All about feelings (3)

Kristina: We put these on here?

Peter: Yes, safety first.

Edwin: 'cause you're breaking things and there's a lot of sharp objects--

Kristina: Okay.

Edwin: So you're wearing an orange helmet with a mesh welding mask and you're wearing blue-felt welding gloves--

Menaka: Okay let me put on my gloves.

Edwin: And a white jumpsuit with a rage ground patch on it.

Kristina: Let's do it.

[laughter]

Edwin: Right now, we have a room full of different items. We have vases, all types of glass, we have some electronics, printers, keyboards, desktops all have been cleaned and our safe to break.

Peter: I'm going to close the doors so that nothing leaks out and have fun guys, let us know when you're done.

Kristina: [laughs] I'm so excited.

[smashing noises]

Kristina: Okay, I think we're done.

Peter: How was it?

Kristina: It was great.

Edwin: I think people afterwards, they feel relieved,

Peter: very relaxed and calm.

Edwin: They come out feeling like they've gotten this huge weight off their shoulders. They usually come out smiling or they come out sweaty because of- it's basically a work out in there.

Menaka: It made me feel physically powerful to be able to break glass and to make a dent in a computer tower but there's other things too that make me feel powerful in my normal life, so it was a similar feeling to exercising hard or trying to run fast.

Kristina: It felt like I was playing an awesome dodge ball game. It's that same kind of like hitting things, that's really fun and you don't have to worry about getting hurt really. I mean we were very careful in the room. I slept really well after. I had one of the best sleeps I've had this year.

Menaka: It's hard to break things. You don't think about that when you feel angry and you're like "Oh I really want to break something, it's actually really hard work.”

Molly: We should say in basically all normal situations, Brains On! does not endorse breaking things. It's really important to think of ways of handling your feelings without hurting other people or their stuff, especially when your feelings are really big.

Is there anything that you do that helps you when you feel angry DaCari?

DaCari: I just close my eyes and go to my happy place and pretend I'm the only one there. It helps me every time.

Molly: That is really great. Can I ask you what is your happy place?

DaCari: My happy place is full of legos.

Molly: Oh yes, that's awesome. What kind of stuff do you like to build with legos?

DaCari: I build cities, houses, cars, airplanes and helicopters.

Molly: Yeah when I am angry, I take deep breaths. That helps me a lot, but now I think I might start imagining a lego room. I think that would really help me too.

And Mallika Chopra has another idea of what to do when you're angry.

DaCari: She's a meditation and mindfulness expert.

Molly: In every episode of this series, she's sharing meditations you can try when you feel different feelings. Here's what Malika suggests for big, angry feelings.

[music]

Mallika Chopra: When we get angry, you can often feel it in your body so you may feel that your face gets red, you clench your hands, your heart starts beating really fast and you may even feel like hitting something or shouting out loud. Your body reacts to anger.

When we are angry what I suggest is an exercise called STOP, S-T-O-P. S is for stop what you're doing.

T is take three breaths because breathing helps us slow down, so take three breaths in and out.

O is observe what's happening in your body. Like I said, it's normal for your heart to start beating or your hands to start sweating or get clenched, your face to get hot. Observe what's happening while you're taking those breaths.

P is for proceed. What this does is it helps your anger get more in control so that you feel like you can make good decisions and not angry decisions.

[music]

Molly: It's very normal to feel angry sometimes.

DaCari: We evolved to sometimes want to fight and respond to a threat. But there are a lot of different reasons people feel angry.

Molly: Chemicals called hormones send messages within your body.

DaCari: Adrenaline and cortisol are key hormones in our fight, flight or freeze response.

Molly: But if you pause to realize what's happening to your body, you can calm down and think about what to do next.

DaCari: Scientists are still trying to understand exactly how meditation affects us, but so far it seems that people pause and pay attention better.

Molly: Naming different types of anger can help you understand and help control this feeling.

DaCari: That's it for this episode of Brains On. Brains On is produced by Marc Sanchez, Sanden Totten and Molly Bloom.

Molly: This series was also produced by Menaka Wilhelm and Sam Choo, with support from Call To Mind - APM's mental health initiative. We had production help from Hannah Harris Green, Kristina Lopez, Elyssa Dudley, Phyllis Fletcher and Emily Bright. And we had engineering help from Veronica Rodriguez, Bob White and Cameron Wiley. Special thanks to Naundia Fitzgerald, Jamar Peete, Andres Gonzalez and the Holistic Life Foundation, Kaz Nelson, Cindy Willner, John Rabe, Gabriel Cortes, Jessica Flores, Marley Feuerwerker-otto, Libby Denkman, and Jonaki Mehta.

DaCari: Now before we go, it's time for the Moment of Um...

Ben: Why does the sound of nails on a chalkboard bother people so much?

Adrian: When you say sound of fingernails on a chalkboard, immediately everyone has the same feeling. We actually don't know why specifically we are so repulsive to it.

My name is Adrian KC Lee, I'm associate professor of the department of speech and hearing sciences at the University of Washington. First of all, we need to know something about frequency. Sound, you can analyze it like on a piano. There's low sound, low frequency. There's high sound, high frequency. For nails scratching a chalkboard, a particular range of the piano, shall we say, as two to four kilohertz, so tends to be somewhere in the middle to high range.

It turns out our ear, especially our outer ear, so the bits that you can actually feel with your fingers right now, accentuate sounds between two to four kilohertz particularly well. In some way, that frequency range is extremely important for a lot of things.

Speech has a lot of energy around that area of frequency and so does many other environmental sounds. People speculate we are more sensitive to that region because babies crying is around that acoustical region or chimpanzee crying.

We actually don't know exactly whether that is true that we're that particularly sensitive to the fingernails scratching the chalkboard as tied to all these different environmental sounds that we're biologically predisposed to process. Why is it useful? I have no idea but it's something that is universal.

HONOR ROLL

Molly: We'll be back soon with more answers to your questions!

DaCari: Thanks for listening!



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Angry: All about feelings (3)

**Kristina:** We put these on here?

**Peter:** Yes, safety first.

**Edwin: '**cause you're breaking things and there's a lot of sharp objects--

**Kristina:** Okay.

**Edwin:** So you're wearing an orange helmet with a mesh welding mask and you're wearing blue-felt welding gloves--

**Menaka:** Okay let me put on my gloves.

**Edwin:** And a white jumpsuit with a rage ground patch on it.

**Kristina:** Let's do it.

[laughter]

**Edwin:** Right now, we have a room full of different items. We have vases, all types of glass, we have some electronics, printers, keyboards, desktops all have been cleaned and our safe to break.

**Peter:** I'm going to close the doors so that nothing leaks out and have fun guys, let us know when you're done.

**Kristina:** [laughs] I'm so excited.

[smashing noises]

**Kristina:** Okay, I think we're done.

**Peter:** How was it?

**Kristina:** It was great.

**Edwin:** I think people afterwards, they feel relieved,

**Peter:** very relaxed and calm.

**Edwin:** They come out feeling like they've gotten this huge weight off their shoulders. They usually come out smiling or they come out sweaty because of- it's basically a work out in there.

**Menaka:** It made me feel physically powerful to be able to break glass and to make a dent in a computer tower but there's other things too that make me feel powerful in my normal life, so it was a similar feeling to exercising hard or trying to run fast.

**Kristina:** It felt like I was playing an awesome dodge ball game. It's that same kind of like hitting things, that's really fun and you don't have to worry about getting hurt really. I mean we were very careful in the room. I slept really well after. I had one of the best sleeps I've had this year.

**Menaka:** It's hard to break things. You don't think about that when you feel angry and you're like "Oh I really want to break something, it's actually really hard work.”

**Molly:** We should say in basically all normal situations, __Brains On!__ does not endorse breaking things. It's really important to think of ways of handling your feelings without hurting other people or their stuff, especially when your feelings are really big.

Is there anything that you do that helps you when you feel angry DaCari?

**DaCari:** I just close my eyes and go to my happy place and pretend I'm the only one there. It helps me every time.

**Molly:** That is really great. Can I ask you what is your happy place?

**DaCari:** My happy place is full of legos.

**Molly:** Oh yes, that's awesome. What kind of stuff do you like to build with legos?

**DaCari:** I build cities, houses, cars, airplanes and helicopters.

**Molly:** Yeah when I am angry, I take deep breaths. That helps me a lot, but now I think I might start imagining a lego room. I think that would really help me too.

And Mallika Chopra has another idea of what to do when you're angry.

**DaCari:** She's a meditation and mindfulness expert.

**Molly:** In every episode of this series, she's sharing meditations you can try when you feel different feelings. Here's what Malika suggests for big, angry feelings.

[music]

**Mallika Chopra:** When we get angry, you can often feel it in your body so you may feel that your face gets red, you clench your hands, your heart starts beating really fast and you may even feel like hitting something or shouting out loud. Your body reacts to anger.

When we are angry what I suggest is an exercise called STOP, S-T-O-P. S is for stop what you're doing.

T is take three breaths because breathing helps us slow down, so take three breaths in and out.

O is observe what's happening in your body. Like I said, it's normal for your heart to start beating or your hands to start sweating or get clenched, your face to get hot. Observe what's happening while you're taking those breaths.

P is for proceed. What this does is it helps your anger get more in control so that you feel like you can make good decisions and not angry decisions.

[music]

**Molly:** It's very normal to feel angry sometimes.

**DaCari:** We evolved to sometimes want to fight and respond to a threat. But there are a lot of different reasons people feel angry.

**Molly:** Chemicals called hormones send messages within your body.

**DaCari:** Adrenaline and cortisol are key hormones in our fight, flight or freeze response.

**Molly:** But if you pause to realize what's happening to your body, you can calm down and think about what to do next.

**DaCari:** Scientists are still trying to understand exactly how meditation affects us, but so far it seems that people pause and pay attention better.

**Molly:** Naming different types of anger can help you understand and help control this feeling.

**DaCari**: That's it for this episode of Brains On. Brains On is produced by Marc Sanchez, Sanden Totten and Molly Bloom.

**Molly**: This series was also produced by Menaka Wilhelm and Sam Choo, with support from Call To Mind - APM's mental health initiative. We had production help from Hannah Harris Green, Kristina Lopez, Elyssa Dudley, Phyllis Fletcher and Emily Bright. And we had engineering help from Veronica Rodriguez, Bob White and Cameron Wiley. Special thanks to Naundia Fitzgerald, Jamar Peete, Andres Gonzalez and the Holistic Life Foundation, Kaz Nelson, Cindy Willner, John Rabe, Gabriel Cortes, Jessica Flores, Marley Feuerwerker-otto, Libby Denkman, and Jonaki Mehta.

**DaCari:** Now before we go, it's time for the Moment of Um...

**Ben:** Why does the sound of nails on a chalkboard bother people so much?

**Adrian:** When you say sound of fingernails on a chalkboard, immediately everyone has the same feeling. We actually don't know why specifically we are so repulsive to it.

My name is Adrian KC Lee, I'm associate** **professor of the department of speech and hearing sciences at the University of Washington. First of all, we need to know something about frequency. Sound, you can analyze it like on a piano. There's low sound, low frequency. There's high sound, high frequency. For nails scratching a chalkboard, a particular range of the piano, shall we say, as two to four kilohertz, so tends to be somewhere in the middle to high range.

It turns out our ear, especially our outer ear, so the bits that you can actually feel with your fingers right now, accentuate sounds between two to four kilohertz particularly well. In some way, that frequency range is extremely important for a lot of things.

Speech has a lot of energy around that area of frequency and so does many other environmental sounds. People speculate we are more sensitive to that region because babies crying is around that acoustical region or chimpanzee crying.

We actually don't know exactly whether that is true that we're that particularly sensitive to the fingernails scratching the chalkboard as tied to all these different environmental sounds that we're biologically predisposed to process. Why is it useful? I have no idea but it's something that is universal.

HONOR ROLL

**Molly**: We'll be back soon with more answers to your questions!

**DaCari**: Thanks for listening!

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