×

We use cookies to help make LingQ better. By visiting the site, you agree to our cookie policy.


image

E-Books (english-e-reader), The Three Strangers (1)

The Three Strangers (1)

The first stranger

In the south-west of England there are many long, low, grassy hills, which have not changed their appearance for centuries. Farmers still keep their sheep on them, and the only buildings are lonely cottages, where shepherds live.

Fifty years ago there was a shepherd's cottage on one of these hills. It was only three miles from the market town of Casterbridge, but it was unusual for travellers to pass this way. There was no road, just two footpaths which crossed in front of the cottage door. During the long winters, snow and rain fell heavily here, which made travelling difficult.

The night of March 28th, 1825, was one of the coldest and wettest that winter, but inside the cottage all was warm and cheerful. Shepherd Fennel had invited family and friends to drink to the health of his youngest child, a recent arrival in the family. Nineteen people were at the party: married women and single girls, shepherds and farm workers, young people talking of love, and old friends talking of the past.

Shepherd Fennel had chosen his wife well. She was a farmer's daughter from one of the valleys, and when she married, she brought fifty pounds with her in her pocket and kept it there, for the needs of a coming family. She did not like to spend money unnecessarily, and had worried about the kind of party to give that evening. 'At a sit-still party,' she thought, 'the men'll get too comfortable and drink the house dry. But at a dancing-party people get hungry and then they'll eat all our food! We'll have both sitting and dancing - that's the best way.' And secretly she told the fiddler to play for no more than fifteen minutes at a time.

But when the dancing began, nobody wanted to stop. The fiddler refused to catch Mrs Fennel's eye, and played on. The music got louder and louder, and the excited dancers stepped faster and faster. Mrs Fennel could do nothing about it, so she sat helplessly in a corner, as the minutes became an hour.

While this was happening indoors, outside in the heavy rain and darkness a figure was climbing up the hill from Casterbridge. It was a tall, thin man, about forty years old, dressed all in black and wearing thick, heavy boots.

When he reached the shepherd's cottage, the rain came down harder than ever. The man left the footpath and went up to the door. He listened carefully, but the music inside had now stopped, and the man seemed unsure what to do.

He looked around, but could see no one on the footpath behind him, and no other houses anywhere near.

At last he decided to knock on the door.

'Come in!' called Shepherd Fennel. All eyes turned towards the stranger, as he entered the warm room.

He kept his hat on, low over his face. 'The rain is heavy, friends,' he said in a rich, deep voice. 'May I come in and rest here for a while?'

'O' course, stranger,' replied the shepherd. 'You've chosen your moment well, because we're having a party tonight. There's a new baby in the family, you see.'

'I hope you and your fine wife'll have many more, shepherd,' the man answered, smiling politely at Mrs Fennel. He looked quickly round the room, and seemed happy with what he saw. He took his hat off, and shook the water from his shoulders.

'Will you have a drink with us, stranger?' asked Fennel. He passed a mug of his wife's home-made mead to the newcomer, who drank deeply from it and held it out for more.

'I'll take a seat in the chimney corner, if you don't mind,' said the man, 'to dry my clothes a bit.' He moved closer to the fire, and began to look very much at home.

'There's only one more thing that I need to make me happy,' he added, 'and that's a little tobacco.'

'I'll fill your pipe,' said the shepherd kindly.

'Can you lend me one?'

'You're a smoker, and you've no pipe?' said Fennel.

'I dropped it somewhere on the road.' The man lit the pipe that Fennel gave him, and seemed to want to talk no more.

CHAPTER TWO

The second stranger

During this conversation the other visitors had not taken much notice of the stranger, because they were discussing what the fiddler should play next. They were just getting up to start another dance when there was a second knock at the door. At this sound, the stranger turned his back to the door, and seemed very busy trying to light his pipe.

'Come in!' called Shepherd Fennel a second time. In a moment another man entered. He too was a stranger.

This one was very different from the first. There was a more cheerful look about him. He was several years older, with greying hair and a full, reddish face. Under his long wet coat he was wearing a dark grey suit.

'I must ask to rest here for a few minutes, friends,' he said, 'or I shall be wet to the skin before I reach Casterbridge.'

'Make yourself at home, sir,' replied Fennel, a little less warmly than when welcoming the first stranger. The cottage was not large, there were not many chairs, and these newcomers brought cold, wet air into the room.

The second visitor took off his coat and hat, and sat down heavily at the table, which the dancers had pushed into the chimney corner. He found himself sitting next to the first stranger, who smiled politely at him and passed him the mug of mead. The second man took it, lifted it to his mouth, and drank without stopping, watched by Mrs Fennel, who was not pleased at this free drinking of her best mead.

At last the man in the grey suit put down the mug with a happy sigh. 'That's wonderful mead, shepherd!' he said. 'I haven't tasted anything as good as that for many years.

'I'm pleased you enjoy it, sir!' replied Shepherd Fennel.

'It's goodish mead,' agreed his wife, a little coldly. 'Made from our own honey, o' course, and it is trouble enough to make, I can tell ye. But we may not make any more - honey sells well, and we don't need much mead for ourselves.'

'Oh, but you can't stop making this!' cried the man in grey. He took the mug again and drank the last drop. 'I love mead, as much as I love going to church on Sundays, or giving money to the poor!'

'Ha, ha, ha!' said the man by the fire, who seemed to enjoy the stranger's little joke.

The old mead of those days, made with the best honey and the freshest eggs, tasted very strong, but it did not taste as strong as it actually was. Before long, the stranger in grey became very cheerful and red in the face. He made himself comfortable in his chair, and continued the conversation.

'Well, as I say, I'm on my way to Casterbridge,' he said.

'You don't live there then?' said Shepherd Fennel.

'Not yet, although I plan to move there soon.'

'Going to start a business, perhaps?' asked the shepherd.

'No, no,' said his wife. 'It is easy to see that the gentleman is rich, and doesn't need to work at anything.'

'Rich is not the word for me, madam,' replied the man in grey. 'I have to work, and I do work. And even if I only get to Casterbridge by midnight tonight, I must begin work there at eight o'clock tomorrow morning. Yes, hot or cold, rain or snow, I must do my day's work tomorrow.'

'Poor man! So, although you look rich and comfortable, your life is harder than ours, is it?' said the shepherd's wife.

'Well, it's the work that I have to do, that's all. Now I must leave you, friends. But before I go, there's time for one more drink to your baby's health. Only, the mug is empty.

'Here's some small mead, sir,' offered Mrs Fennel. 'We call it small, but it's still made from good honey.'

'No,' said the stranger. 'I prefer to remember the taste of your best mead, thank you.'

'Of course you do,' said Shepherd Fennel quickly. He went to the dark place under the stairs where the best mead was kept, and filled the mug. His wife followed him and spoke worriedly to him in a low voice.

'I don't like the look o' the man at all! He's drunk enough for ten men already! Don't give him any more o' the best!'

'But he's in our house, my love, and 'tis a miserable wet night. What's a mug of mead more or less?'

'Very well, just this time then,' she said, looking sadly at the mead. 'But who is he, and what kind of work does he do?'

'I don't know. I'll ask him again.'

While the man in grey drank his mead, Fennel asked him again about his work, but the man did not reply at once. Suddenly the first stranger spoke from his seat by the fire.

'Anybody may know what I do - I work with wheels.'

'And anybody may know what I do,' said the man in the grey suit, 'if they're clever enough to find it out.'

There was a short silence, which the shepherd's wife broke by calling for a song. The second mug of mead had made the stranger's face even redder and more cheerful than before, and he offered to sing the first song. This is what he sang:

My job is the strangest one,

Honest shepherds all-

Work that all the world can see;

My customers I tie, and I take them up so high,

And send 'em to a far country!

No one spoke, except the man near the fire, who joined in the last part, with a deep, musical voice:

And send 'em to a far country!

None of the people in the room understood what the singer meant, except the man near the fire, who continued smoking, and said calmly, 'Go on, stranger! Sing on!'

The man in grey drank again from his mug, and sang:

There isn't much I need,

Honest shepherds all -

To set the criminals free.

A little piece of rope, and a tall hanging post,

And that'll be enough for me!

Now it was clear to everybody in the room that the stranger was answering the shepherd's question in song. They all looked at him, their eyes and mouths wide open in horror.

'Oh, he's the hangman!' they whispered to each other. 'He's come to hang that poor clockmaker tomorrow in Casterbridge prison - the clockmaker who had no work, and whose children had no food, so he stole a sheep, and now he's going to hang for it!'

CHAPTER THREE

The third stranger

Just then, there was another knock on the door. People seemed frightened, and Shepherd Fennel was slow to call out, for the third time, the welcoming words, 'Come in!'

The door was gently opened, and another stranger stood in the doorway. He was a little man, with fair hair, and was tidily dressed. 'Can you tell me the way to-?' he began, but stopped speaking when his eyes fell on the stranger in grey, who, at that moment, started singing again,

Tomorrow is my working day,

Honest shepherds all-

Working with the little piece of rope.

A sheep has lost its life, and the thief must pay the price.

He'll find some peace with God, we hope!

The man by the fire repeated cheerfully in his deep voice:

He'll find some peace with God, we hope!

All this time the third stranger had stood in the doorway, and now everyone turned to look at him. They saw to their surprise that his face was white, his hands were shaking, and his eyes were fixed in horror on the man in grey. A moment later he turned, and ran away into the darkness and the rain.


The Three Strangers (1)

The first stranger

In the south-west of England there are many long, low, grassy hills, which have not changed their appearance for centuries. イングランドの南西には、何世紀にもわたって外観が変わっていない、長くて低く、草が茂った丘がたくさんあります。 Farmers still keep their sheep on them, and the only buildings are lonely cottages, where shepherds live. 農民たちは今でも羊を飼っていて、唯一の建物は羊飼いが住む孤独な小屋です。

Fifty years ago there was a shepherd's cottage on one of these hills. 50年前、これらの丘の1つに羊飼いの小屋がありました。 It was only three miles from the market town of Casterbridge, but it was unusual for travellers to pass this way. マーケットタウンのキャスターブリッジからわずか5kmのところにありましたが、旅行者がこの道を通過するのは珍しいことでした。 There was no road, just two footpaths which crossed in front of the cottage door. 道路はなく、コテージのドアの前を横切る歩道が2つだけありました。 Дороги не было, только две пешеходные дорожки, которые пересекались перед дверью коттеджа. During the long winters, snow and rain fell heavily here, which made travelling difficult. 長い冬の間、ここでは雪と雨が激しく降り、旅行が困難になりました。

The night of March 28th, 1825, was one of the coldest and wettest that winter, but inside the cottage all was warm and cheerful. 1825年3月28日の夜は、その冬で最も寒くて雨が多かった夜でしたが、コテージの中はすべて暖かく陽気でした。 Shepherd Fennel had invited family and friends to drink to the health of his youngest child, a recent arrival in the family. 羊飼いのフェンネルは、家族や友人を招待して、最近家族に到着した末っ子の健康のために飲み物を飲ませました。 Вівчарка Феннел запросила сім'ю та друзів випити за здоров'я своєї молодшої дитини, яка нещодавно з'явилася в сім'ї. Nineteen people were at the party: married women and single girls, shepherds and farm workers, young people talking of love, and old friends talking of the past. パーティーには19人が参加しました。既婚女性と独身の女の子、羊飼いと農場労働者、愛について話している若者、過去について話している古い友人です。 На вечірці було дев'ятнадцять людей: заміжні жінки та незаміжні дівчата, пастухи та робітники, молоді люди, що розмовляли про кохання, і старі друзі, які розмовляли про минуле.

Shepherd Fennel had chosen his wife well. 羊飼いのフェンネルは彼の妻をよく選びました。 Пастух Фенхель удачно выбрал себе жену. She was a farmer's daughter from one of the valleys, and when she married, she brought fifty pounds with her in her pocket and kept it there, for the needs of a coming family. 彼女は谷の1つからの農夫の娘でした、そして、彼女が結婚したとき、彼女は彼女のポケットに彼女と一緒に50ポンドを持ってきて、来たるべき家族の必要性のためにそこにそれを保ちました。 She did not like to spend money unnecessarily, and had worried about the kind of party to give that evening. 彼女は不必要にお金を使うのが好きではなく、その夜にどんなパーティーをするのか心配していました。 'At a sit-still party,' she thought, 'the men'll get too comfortable and drink the house dry. 「じっとしているパーティーで」彼女は思った、「男性はあまりにも快適になり、家を乾かして飲むでしょう。 «На вечірці, — подумала вона, — чоловіки влаштуються надто комфортно й вип’ють будинок досуха. But at a dancing-party people get hungry and then they'll eat all our food! しかし、ダンスパーティーでは、人々は空腹になり、それから彼らは私たちの食べ物をすべて食べます! We'll have both sitting and dancing - that's the best way.' 座ったり踊ったりするのが一番です。それが最善の方法です。」 And secretly she told the fiddler to play for no more than fifteen minutes at a time. そして密かに彼女はフィドラーに一度に15分以内でプレーするように言いました。

But when the dancing began, nobody wanted to stop. しかし、ダンスが始まったとき、誰も止めたくありませんでした。 The fiddler refused to catch Mrs Fennel's eye, and played on. フィドラーはフェンネル夫人の目を引くことを拒否し、遊んだ。 The music got louder and louder, and the excited dancers stepped faster and faster. 音楽はどんどん大きくなり、興奮したダンサーはどんどん速く歩きました。 Mrs Fennel could do nothing about it, so she sat helplessly in a corner, as the minutes became an hour. フェンネル夫人はそれについて何もできなかったので、議事録が1時間になると、彼女はどうしようもなく隅に座った。

While this was happening indoors, outside in the heavy rain and darkness a figure was climbing up the hill from Casterbridge. これが屋内で起こっている間、大雨と暗闇の中で外で、人物がキャスターブリッジから丘を登っていました。 It was a tall, thin man, about forty years old, dressed all in black and wearing thick, heavy boots. それは背が高くて細い男で、約40歳で、すべて黒の服を着て、厚くて重いブーツを履いていました。

When he reached the shepherd's cottage, the rain came down harder than ever. 彼が羊飼いの小屋に着いたとき、雨はかつてないほど激しく降りました。 The man left the footpath and went up to the door. 男は歩道を出てドアまで上がった。 He listened carefully, but the music inside had now stopped, and the man seemed unsure what to do. 彼は注意深く耳を傾けたが、中の音楽は止まり、男はどうしたらいいのかわからなくなったようだった。

He looked around, but could see no one on the footpath behind him, and no other houses anywhere near. 彼は周りを見回しましたが、彼の後ろの歩道には誰も見えず、近くに他の家もありませんでした。

At last he decided to knock on the door. ついに彼はドアをノックすることにした。

'Come in!' called Shepherd Fennel. シェパードフェンネルと呼ばれます。 All eyes turned towards the stranger, as he entered the warm room. 彼が暖かい部屋に入ったとき、すべての目は見知らぬ人の方を向いた。

He kept his hat on, low over his face. 彼は帽子をかぶったまま、顔を低くした。 'The rain is heavy, friends,' he said in a rich, deep voice. 「雨はひどいです、友達」と彼は豊かで深い声で言いました。 'May I come in and rest here for a while?' 「ここに来てしばらく休んでもいいですか?」

'O' course, stranger,' replied the shepherd. 「O」コース、見知らぬ人」と羊飼いは答えました。 'You've chosen your moment well, because we're having a party tonight. 「今夜パーティーを開くので、あなたはあなたの瞬間をうまく選びました。 There's a new baby in the family, you see.' 家族の中に新しい赤ちゃんがいますね。」

'I hope you and your fine wife'll have many more, shepherd,' the man answered, smiling politely at Mrs Fennel. 「羊飼いさん、あなたとあなたの素敵な奥さんがもっとたくさん食べてくれることを願っています」男はフェンネル夫人に礼儀正しく微笑みながら答えた。 He looked quickly round the room, and seemed happy with what he saw. 彼はすぐに部屋を見回し、見たものに満足しているようだった。 He took his hat off, and shook the water from his shoulders. 彼は帽子を脱いで、肩から水を振りました。

'Will you have a drink with us, stranger?' 「見知らぬ人、私たちと一緒に飲み物を飲みませんか?」 asked Fennel. He passed a mug of his wife's home-made mead to the newcomer, who drank deeply from it and held it out for more. 彼は妻の自家製蜂蜜酒のマグカップを新参者に渡しました。新参者はそれから深く飲み、それをさらに持ちこたえました。

'I'll take a seat in the chimney corner, if you don't mind,' said the man, 'to dry my clothes a bit.' 「よろしければ、煙突の隅に座ります」と男は言った、「私の服を少し乾かすために」。 He moved closer to the fire, and began to look very much at home. 彼は火に近づき、家をとてもよく見始めました。

'There's only one more thing that I need to make me happy,' he added, 'and that's a little tobacco.' 「私を幸せにするために必要なものはあと1つだけです」と彼は付け加えました。

'I'll fill your pipe,' said the shepherd kindly. 「私はあなたのパイプを満たします」と羊飼いは親切に言いました。

'Can you lend me one?' 「貸してくれませんか?」

'You're a smoker, and you've no pipe?' 「あなたは喫煙者です、そしてあなたはパイプを持っていませんか?」 said Fennel.

'I dropped it somewhere on the road.' 「私はそれを道路のどこかに落としました。」 The man lit the pipe that Fennel gave him, and seemed to want to talk no more. 男はフェンネルがくれたパイプに火をつけ、もう話したくないようだった。

CHAPTER TWO

The second stranger

During this conversation the other visitors had not taken much notice of the stranger, because they were discussing what the fiddler should play next. この会話の間、他の訪問者は、フィドラーが次に何をするべきかについて話し合っていたので、見知らぬ人にあまり気づいていませんでした。 They were just getting up to start another dance when there was a second knock at the door. ドアに2回目のノックがあったとき、彼らはちょうど起きて別のダンスを始めていました。 At this sound, the stranger turned his back to the door, and seemed very busy trying to light his pipe. この音で、見知らぬ人はドアに背を向け、パイプに火をつけようとしてとても忙しそうに見えました。

'Come in!' called Shepherd Fennel a second time. もう一度シェパードフェンネルと呼ばれました。 In a moment another man entered. すぐに別の男が入った。 He too was a stranger. 彼も見知らぬ人でした。

This one was very different from the first. There was a more cheerful look about him. 彼についてはもっと陽気な表情がありました。 He was several years older, with greying hair and a full, reddish face. 彼は数歳年上で、髪は白髪で、顔は赤みがかっていました。 Under his long wet coat he was wearing a dark grey suit.

'I must ask to rest here for a few minutes, friends,' he said, 'or I shall be wet to the skin before I reach Casterbridge.' 「友達、ここで数分間休むように頼まなければならない」と彼は言った。

'Make yourself at home, sir,' replied Fennel, a little less warmly than when welcoming the first stranger. 「ご自宅にいるように」とフェンネルは、最初の見知らぬ人を迎えるときよりも少し暖かく答えました。 The cottage was not large, there were not many chairs, and these newcomers brought cold, wet air into the room.

The second visitor took off his coat and hat, and sat down heavily at the table, which the dancers had pushed into the chimney corner. 二人目の訪問者は上着と帽子を脱いで、ダンサーが煙突の隅に押し込んだテーブルに大きく腰を下ろした。 He found himself sitting next to the first stranger, who smiled politely at him and passed him the mug of mead. The second man took it, lifted it to his mouth, and drank without stopping, watched by Mrs Fennel, who was not pleased at this free drinking of her best mead.

At last the man in the grey suit put down the mug with a happy sigh. 'That's wonderful mead, shepherd!' 「それは素晴らしいミードです、羊飼い!」 he said. 'I haven't tasted anything as good as that for many years. 「私は何年もの間、それほどおいしいものを味わっていません。

'I'm pleased you enjoy it, sir!' 「楽しんでいただけてうれしいです、サー!」 replied Shepherd Fennel.

'It's goodish mead,' agreed his wife, a little coldly. 「それは良いミードだ」と彼の妻は少し冷たく同意した。 'Made from our own honey, o' course, and it is trouble enough to make, I can tell ye. 「私たち自身の蜂蜜から作られました」もちろん、それは作るのに十分な手間がかかります、私はあなたがたに言うことができます。 But we may not make any more - honey sells well, and we don't need much mead for ourselves.' しかし、私たちはこれ以上作ることができないかもしれません-蜂蜜はよく売れています、そして私たちは自分たちのために多くの蜂蜜酒を必要としません。

'Oh, but you can't stop making this!' 「ああ、でもこれをやめられない!」 cried the man in grey. 男は灰色で叫んだ。 He took the mug again and drank the last drop. 彼は再びマグカップを取り、最後の一滴を飲みました。 'I love mead, as much as I love going to church on Sundays, or giving money to the poor!' 「私は日曜日に教会に行くことや貧しい人々にお金を与えることを愛するのと同じくらい、ミードが大好きです!」

'Ha, ha, ha!' said the man by the fire, who seemed to enjoy the stranger's little joke.

The old mead of those days, made with the best honey and the freshest eggs, tasted very strong, but it did not taste as strong as it actually was. 最高の蜂蜜と新鮮な卵で作られた当時の古い蜂蜜酒は、非常に強い味がしましたが、実際ほど強くはありませんでした。 Before long, the stranger in grey became very cheerful and red in the face. やがて、灰色の見知らぬ人はとても陽気になり、顔を真っ赤にしました。 He made himself comfortable in his chair, and continued the conversation.

'Well, as I say, I'm on my way to Casterbridge,' he said. 「まあ、私が言うように、私はキャスターブリッジに行く途中です」と彼は言いました。

'You don't live there then?' 「あなたはそこに住んでいないのですか?」 said Shepherd Fennel.

'Not yet, although I plan to move there soon.' 「まだですが、すぐにそこに移動する予定です。」

'Going to start a business, perhaps?' 「起業するのか?」 asked the shepherd.

'No, no,' said his wife. 'It is easy to see that the gentleman is rich, and doesn't need to work at anything.' 「紳士が金持ちで、何もする必要がないことは簡単にわかります。」

'Rich is not the word for me, madam,' replied the man in grey. 「リッチは私にとって言葉ではありません、マダム」と男は灰色で答えました。 'I have to work, and I do work. And even if I only get to Casterbridge by midnight tonight, I must begin work there at eight o'clock tomorrow morning. そして、今夜深夜までにキャスターブリッジに着いたとしても、明日の朝8時にそこで働き始めなければなりません。 Yes, hot or cold, rain or snow, I must do my day's work tomorrow.' はい、暑くても寒くても、雨でも雪でも、明日は一日の仕事をしなければなりません。」

'Poor man! So, although you look rich and comfortable, your life is harder than ours, is it?' それで、あなたは裕福で快適そうに見えますが、あなたの生活は私たちの生活よりも大変ですよね?」 said the shepherd's wife.

'Well, it's the work that I have to do, that's all. 「まあ、それは私がしなければならない仕事です、それだけです。 Now I must leave you, friends. 今、私はあなたを残さなければなりません、友達。 But before I go, there's time for one more drink to your baby's health. しかし、私が行く前に、赤ちゃんの健康のためにもう一杯飲む時間があります。 Only, the mug is empty. ただ、マグカップは空です。

'Here's some small mead, sir,' offered Mrs Fennel. 「ここに小さな蜂蜜酒があります、サー」とフェンネル夫人は申し出ました。 'We call it small, but it's still made from good honey.' 「私たちはそれを小さいと呼びますが、それでも良い蜂蜜から作られています。」

'No,' said the stranger. 'I prefer to remember the taste of your best mead, thank you.' 「私はあなたの最高のミードの味を覚えておきたいです、ありがとう。」

'Of course you do,' said Shepherd Fennel quickly. He went to the dark place under the stairs where the best mead was kept, and filled the mug. 彼は最高のミードが保管されている階段の下の暗い場所に行き、マグカップを満たしました。 His wife followed him and spoke worriedly to him in a low voice. 彼の妻は彼に従い、心配そうに低い声で彼に話しかけた。

'I don't like the look o' the man at all! 「私は見た目が好きではありません」男! He's drunk enough for ten men already! 彼はすでに10人の男性のために十分に酔っています! Don't give him any more o' the best!' これ以上彼に最高のものを与えないでください!」

'But he's in our house, my love, and 'tis a miserable wet night. 「しかし、彼は私たちの家にいます、私の愛、そして」悲惨な雨の夜です。 What's a mug of mead more or less?' 多かれ少なかれミードのマグカップは何ですか?」

'Very well, just this time then,' she said, looking sadly at the mead. 「まあ、その時だけだ」と彼女は悲しげにミードを見て言った。 'But who is he, and what kind of work does he do?'

'I don't know. I'll ask him again.'

While the man in grey drank his mead, Fennel asked him again about his work, but the man did not reply at once. 灰色の男が蜂蜜酒を飲んでいる間、フェンネルは彼に彼の仕事についてもう一度尋ねました、しかし男はすぐに答えませんでした。 Suddenly the first stranger spoke from his seat by the fire. 突然、最初の見知らぬ人が火のそばで彼の席から話しました。

'Anybody may know what I do - I work with wheels.' 「誰もが私が何をしているのか知っているかもしれません-私は車輪を使って仕事をしています。」

'And anybody may know what I do,' said the man in the grey suit, 'if they're clever enough to find it out.' 「そして、誰もが私が何をしているのか知っているかもしれない」と灰色のスーツを着た男は言った。

There was a short silence, which the shepherd's wife broke by calling for a song. 短い沈黙があり、羊飼いの妻は歌を求めてそれを破りました。 The second mug of mead had made the stranger's face even redder and more cheerful than before, and he offered to sing the first song. 蜂蜜酒の2番目のマグカップは、見知らぬ人の顔を以前よりもさらに赤く元気にし、彼は最初の歌を歌うことを申し出ました。 This is what he sang:

My job is the strangest one,

Honest shepherds all-

Work that all the world can see; 全世界が見ることができる仕事。

My customers I tie, and I take them up so high, 私が結ぶ私の顧客、そして私は彼らをとても高く取り上げます、

And send 'em to a far country! そして、それらを遠い国に送ってください!

No one spoke, except the man near the fire, who joined in the last part, with a deep, musical voice:

And send 'em to a far country!

None of the people in the room understood what the singer meant, except the man near the fire, who continued smoking, and said calmly, 'Go on, stranger! 火のそばで喫煙を続け、落ち着いて言った男を除いて、部屋の誰も歌手の意味を理解していませんでした。 Sing on!' 歌って!」

The man in grey drank again from his mug, and sang:

There isn't much I need, 必要なものはあまりありませんが

Honest shepherds all - 正直な羊飼い全員-

To set the criminals free. 犯罪者を解放するため。

A little piece of rope, and a tall hanging post, 小さなロープと背の高い吊り下げ支柱、

And that'll be enough for me! そして、それで十分です!

Now it was clear to everybody in the room that the stranger was answering the shepherd's question in song. 今では、見知らぬ人が羊飼いの質問に歌で答えていることが部屋の誰にとっても明らかでした。 They all looked at him, their eyes and mouths wide open in horror. 彼らは皆彼を見ました、彼らの目と口は恐怖で大きく開いていました。

'Oh, he's the hangman!' they whispered to each other. 'He's come to hang that poor clockmaker tomorrow in Casterbridge prison - the clockmaker who had no work, and whose children had no food, so he stole a sheep, and now he's going to hang for it!' 「彼は明日、そのかわいそうな時計職人をキャスターブリッジ刑務所に吊るすようになりました。仕事がなく、子供たちにも食べ物がなかった時計師は、羊を盗んだので、今度はそれを求めて吊るします!」

CHAPTER THREE

The third stranger

Just then, there was another knock on the door. People seemed frightened, and Shepherd Fennel was slow to call out, for the third time, the welcoming words, 'Come in!'

The door was gently opened, and another stranger stood in the doorway. He was a little man, with fair hair, and was tidily dressed. 彼は金髪の小さな男で、きちんとした服装をしていました。 'Can you tell me the way to-?' 'までの道順を教えてくれませんか-?' he began, but stopped speaking when his eyes fell on the stranger in grey, who, at that moment, started singing again,

Tomorrow is my working day,

Honest shepherds all- 正直な羊飼い全員-

Working with the little piece of rope. ロープの小片を使って作業します。

A sheep has lost its life, and the thief must pay the price. 羊は命を落とし、泥棒は代償を払わなければなりません。

He'll find some peace with God, we hope! 彼は神との平和を見つけるでしょう、私たちは願っています!

The man by the fire repeated cheerfully in his deep voice: 火のそばの男は彼の深い声で元気に繰り返しました:

He'll find some peace with God, we hope! 彼は神との平和を見つけるでしょう、私たちは願っています!

All this time the third stranger had stood in the doorway, and now everyone turned to look at him. この間ずっと、3人目の見知らぬ人が戸口に立っていたので、今では誰もが彼を見るようになりました。 They saw to their surprise that his face was white, his hands were shaking, and his eyes were fixed in horror on the man in grey. 彼らは驚いたことに、彼の顔は白く、手は震え、そして彼の目は灰色の男に恐怖で固定されていた。 A moment later he turned, and ran away into the darkness and the rain. しばらくして、彼は振り返り、暗闇と雨の中に逃げました。