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E-Books (english-e-reader), The Memento

The Memento

The window of Miss D'Armande's room looked out onto Broadway and its theatres. But Lynette D'Armande turned her chair round and sat with her back to Broadway. She was an actress, and needed the Broadway theatres, but Broadway did not need her.

She was staying in the Hotel Thalia. Actors go there to rest for the summer and then try to get work for the autumn when the little theatres open again. Miss D'Armande's room in this hotel was a small one, but in it there were many mementoes of her days in the theatre, and there were also pictures of some of her best friends. She looked at one of these pictures now, and smiled at it.

'I'd like to know where Lee is now,' she said to herself.

She was looking at a picture of Miss Rosalie Ray, a very beautiful young woman. In the picture, Miss Ray was wearing a very short skirt and she was sitting on a swing. Every night in the theatre she went high in the air on her swing, over the heads of all the people.

When she did this, all the men in the theatre got very excited and stood up. This was because, when her long beautiful legs were high in the air, her yellow garter flew off and fell down to the men below. She did this every evening, and every evening a hundred hands went up to catch the garter. She did other things. She sang, she danced, but when she got onto her swing, all the men stood up. Miss Ray did not have to try very hard to find work in the theatre.

After two years of this, Miss D'Armande remembered, Miss Ray suddenly left the theatre and went to live in the country.

And seventeen minutes after Miss D'Armande said, 'I'd like to know where Lee is now', somebody knocked on the door.

It was, of course, Rosalie Ray.

'Come in,' Miss D'Armande called, and Miss Ray came in. Yes, it was Rosalie. She took off her hat, and Miss D'Armande could see that she looked very tired and unhappy.

'I've got the room above you,' Rosalie said. 'They told me at the desk downstairs that you were here.'

'I've been here since the end of April,' Lynnette replied. 'I begin work again next week, out in a small town. But you left the theatre three months ago, Lee. Why are you here?'

'I'll tell you, Lynn, but give me a drink first.' Miss D'Armande passed a bottle to her friend.

'Ah, that's good!' said Rosalie. 'My first drink for three months. Yes, Lynn, I left the theatre because I was tired of the life, and because I was tired of men - well, the men who come to the theatre. You know we have to fight them off all the time. They're animals! They ask you to go out with them, they buy you a drink or two - and then they think that they can do what they want! It's terrible! And we work hard, we get very little money for it, we wait to get to the top - and it never happens. But most of all, I left because of the men.

'Well, I saved two hundred dollars and when summer came, I left the theatre and went to a little village by the sea on Long Island. I planned to stay there for the summer, and then learn how to be a better actress.

'But there was another person who was staying in the same house - the Reverend Arthur Lyle. Yes, Lynn, a man of the church! When I saw him for the first time, I fell in love with him at once. He was a fine man and he had a wonderful voice!

'Well, it's only a short story, Lynn. A month later we decided to marry. We planned to live in a little house near the church, with lots of flowers and animals.

'No, I didn't tell him that I was an actress. I wanted to forget it and to put that life behind me.

'Oh, I was happy! I went to church, I helped the women in the village. Arthur and I went for long walks - and that little village was the best place in the world. I wanted to live there forever...

'But one morning, the old woman who worked in the house began to talk about Arthur. She thought that he was wonderful, too. But then she told me that Arthur was in love once before, and that it ended unhappily. She said that, in his desk, he kept a memento - something which belonged to the girl. Sometimes he took it out and looked at it. But she didn't know what it was - and his desk was locked.

'That afternoon I asked him about it.

"Ida," he said, (of course, I used my real name there) "it was before I knew you, and I never met her. It was different from my love for you."

"Was she beautiful?" I asked.

"She was very beautiful," replied Arthur.

"Did you see her often?"

"About ten times," he said.

"And this memento - did she send it to you?"

"It came to me from her," he said.

"Why did you never meet her?" I asked.

"She was far above me," he answered. "But, Ida, it's finished. You're not angry, are you?"

"Why, no. I love you ten times more than before." And I did, Lynn. Can you understand that? What a beautiful love that was! He never met her, never spoke to her, but he loved her, and wanted nothing from her. He was different from other men, I thought - a really good man!

'About four o'clock that afternoon, Arthur had to go out. The door of his room was open, his desk was unlocked, and I decided to look at this memento. I opened the desk and slowly I took out the box and opened it.

'I took one look at that memento, and then I went to my room and packed my suitcase. My wonderful Arthur, this really good man, was no different from all the other men!'

'But, Lee, what was in the box?' Miss D'Armande asked.

'It was one of my yellow garters!' cried Miss Ray.

- THE END -


The Memento Das Andenken

The window of Miss D'Armande's room looked out onto Broadway and its theatres. ミス・ダルマンドの部屋の窓からブロードウェイとその劇場を見渡せました。 But Lynette D'Armande turned her chair round and sat with her back to Broadway. しかし、リネット・ダルマンドは椅子を振り返り、ブロードウェイに背を向けて座った。 She was an actress, and needed the Broadway theatres, but Broadway did not need her. 彼女は女優であり、ブロードウェイの劇場が必要でしたが、ブロードウェイは彼女を必要としませんでした。

She was staying in the Hotel Thalia. Actors go there to rest for the summer and then try to get work for the autumn when the little theatres open again. 俳優たちは夏の間休憩するためにそこに行き、小さな劇場が再び開く秋に向けて仕事をしようとします。 Miss D'Armande's room in this hotel was a small one, but in it there were many mementoes of her days in the theatre, and there were also pictures of some of her best friends. このホテルのミス・ダルマンドの部屋は小さいものでしたが、劇場には彼女の時代の記念品がたくさんあり、彼女の親友の写真もありました。 She looked at one of these pictures now, and smiled at it. 彼女は今これらの写真の1つを見て、それに微笑んだ。

'I'd like to know where Lee is now,' she said to herself. 「リーが今どこにいるのか知りたい」と彼女は独り言を言った。

She was looking at a picture of Miss Rosalie Ray, a very beautiful young woman. In the picture, Miss Ray was wearing a very short skirt and she was sitting on a swing. Every night in the theatre she went high in the air on her swing, over the heads of all the people. 毎晩劇場で、彼女はすべての人々の頭上で、彼女のブランコで空高く上がった。

When she did this, all the men in the theatre got very excited and stood up. This was because, when her long beautiful legs were high in the air, her yellow garter flew off and fell down to the men below. これは、長くて美しい脚が空中に浮かんでいると、黄色いガーターが飛んで下の男たちのところに落ちたためです。 She did this every evening, and every evening a hundred hands went up to catch the garter. 彼女は毎晩これをしました、そして毎晩ガーターを捕まえるために百の手が上がりました。 She did other things. She sang, she danced, but when she got onto her swing, all the men stood up. 彼女は歌い、踊りましたが、ブランコに乗ると、すべての男性が立ち上がりました。 Miss Ray did not have to try very hard to find work in the theatre. レイさんは劇場で仕事を見つけるために一生懸命努力する必要はありませんでした。

After two years of this, Miss D'Armande remembered, Miss Ray suddenly left the theatre and went to live in the country. この2年後、ミス・ダルマンドは思い出しました。ミス・レイは突然劇場を去り、田舎に住み始めました。

And seventeen minutes after Miss D'Armande said, 'I'd like to know where Lee is now', somebody knocked on the door.

It was, of course, Rosalie Ray. もちろん、それはロザリー・レイでした。

'Come in,' Miss D'Armande called, and Miss Ray came in. Yes, it was Rosalie. She took off her hat, and Miss D'Armande could see that she looked very tired and unhappy. 彼女は帽子を脱いで、ミス・ダルマンドは彼女がとても疲れていて不幸に見えたのを見ることができました。

'I've got the room above you,' Rosalie said. 「私はあなたの上に部屋を持っています」とロザリーは言いました。 'They told me at the desk downstairs that you were here.' 「彼らはあなたがここにいると階下の机で私に言った。」

'I've been here since the end of April,' Lynnette replied. 「私は4月末からここにいます」とLynnetteは答えました。 'I begin work again next week, out in a small town. 「私は来週、小さな町で仕事を再開します。 But you left the theatre three months ago, Lee. しかし、あなたは3か月前に劇場を去りました、リー。 Why are you here?'

'I'll tell you, Lynn, but give me a drink first.' 「リン、教えてあげるけど、最初に飲み物をくれ。」 Miss D'Armande passed a bottle to her friend. ミス・ダルマンドは彼女の友人にボトルを渡しました。

'Ah, that's good!' 「ああ、それはいいね!」 said Rosalie. 'My first drink for three months. '3ヶ月間の私の最初の飲み物。 Yes, Lynn, I left the theatre because I was tired of the life, and because I was tired of men - well, the men who come to the theatre. はい、リン、私は人生にうんざりしていたので、そして私が男性にうんざりしていたので劇場を去りました-まあ、劇場に来る男性。 You know we have to fight them off all the time. あなたは私たちが常に彼らと戦わなければならないことを知っています。 They're animals! They ask you to go out with them, they buy you a drink or two - and then they think that they can do what they want! 彼らはあなたに彼らと一緒に出かけるように頼みます、彼らはあなたに一杯か二杯を買います-そして彼らは彼らが望むことをすることができると思います! It's terrible! And we work hard, we get very little money for it, we wait to get to the top - and it never happens. そして、私たちは一生懸命働き、そのためのお金はほとんど得られず、トップに立つのを待ちます-そしてそれは決して起こりません。 But most of all, I left because of the men. しかし、何よりも、私は男性のために去りました。

'Well, I saved two hundred dollars and when summer came, I left the theatre and went to a little village by the sea on Long Island. 「まあ、私は200ドル節約し、夏が来ると、劇場を出て、ロングアイランドの海沿いの小さな村に行きました。 I planned to stay there for the summer, and then learn how to be a better actress. 私は夏の間そこに滞在し、それからより良い女優になる方法を学ぶことを計画しました。

'But there was another person who was staying in the same house - the Reverend Arthur Lyle. 「しかし、同じ家に滞在していた別の人、アーサー・ライル牧師がいました。 Yes, Lynn, a man of the church! はい、リン、教会の人です! When I saw him for the first time, I fell in love with him at once. 彼に初めて会ったとき、私はすぐに彼に恋をしました。 He was a fine man and he had a wonderful voice! 彼は立派な男で、素晴らしい声を出していました!

'Well, it's only a short story, Lynn. 「まあ、それは短編小説です、リン。 A month later we decided to marry. We planned to live in a little house near the church, with lots of flowers and animals. 私たちは教会の近くにたくさんの花や動物がいる小さな家に住むことを計画しました。

'No, I didn't tell him that I was an actress. 「いいえ、私は女優だと彼に言いませんでした。 I wanted to forget it and to put that life behind me. 私はそれを忘れて、その人生を私の後ろに置きたかったのです。

'Oh, I was happy! I went to church, I helped the women in the village. Arthur and I went for long walks - and that little village was the best place in the world. アーサーと私は長い散歩に出かけました-そしてその小さな村は世界で最高の場所でした。 I wanted to live there forever...

'But one morning, the old woman who worked in the house began to talk about Arthur. She thought that he was wonderful, too. But then she told me that Arthur was in love once before, and that it ended unhappily. しかし、それから彼女はアーサーがかつて恋をしていて、それが不幸に終わったと私に言いました。 She said that, in his desk, he kept a memento - something which belonged to the girl. 彼女は、彼の机の中に、少女のものである記念品を置いていたと言った。 Sometimes he took it out and looked at it. 時々彼はそれを取り出して見ました。 But she didn't know what it was - and his desk was locked. しかし、彼女はそれが何であるかを知りませんでした-そして彼の机は施錠されていました。

'That afternoon I asked him about it.

"Ida," he said, (of course, I used my real name there) "it was before I knew you, and I never met her. 「アイダ」と彼は言った(もちろん、私はそこで私の本名を使用した)「それは私があなたを知る前であり、私は彼女に会ったことがなかった。 It was different from my love for you." それはあなたへの私の愛とは異なっていました。」

"Was she beautiful?" 「彼女は美しかったですか?」 I asked.

"She was very beautiful," replied Arthur.

"Did you see her often?" 「彼女によく会いましたか?」

"About ten times," he said. 「約10回」と彼は言った。

"And this memento - did she send it to you?" 「そしてこの記念品-彼女はそれをあなたに送ったのですか?」

"It came to me from her," he said. 「それは彼女から私に来た」と彼は言った。

"Why did you never meet her?" 「なぜあなたは彼女に会ったことがなかったのですか?」 I asked.

"She was far above me," he answered. 「彼女は私よりはるかに上だった」と彼は答えた。 "But, Ida, it's finished. 「でも、井田、終わった。 You're not angry, are you?" あなたは怒っていませんよね?」

"Why, no. "なんでだめなの。 I love you ten times more than before." 以前の10倍もあなたを愛しています。」 And I did, Lynn. そして、私はそうしました、リン。 Can you understand that? What a beautiful love that was! なんて美しい愛だったのでしょう。 He never met her, never spoke to her, but he loved her, and wanted nothing from her. 彼は彼女に会ったり、話したりしたことはありませんでしたが、彼女を愛し、彼女に何も望んでいませんでした。 He was different from other men, I thought - a really good man!

'About four o'clock that afternoon, Arthur had to go out. 「その日の午後4時ごろ、アーサーは出かけなければなりませんでした。 The door of his room was open, his desk was unlocked, and I decided to look at this memento. I opened the desk and slowly I took out the box and opened it.

'I took one look at that memento, and then I went to my room and packed my suitcase. My wonderful Arthur, this really good man, was no different from all the other men!' 私の素晴らしいアーサー、この本当に良い人は、他のすべての人と何ら変わりはありませんでした!」

'But, Lee, what was in the box?' 「でも、リー、箱の中には何が入っていたの?」 Miss D'Armande asked.

'It was one of my yellow garters!' cried Miss Ray.

- THE END -