×

We use cookies to help make LingQ better. By visiting the site, you agree to our cookie policy.


image

E-Books (english-e-reader), The Landlady (1)

The Landlady (1)

Billy Weaver had travelled down from London on the slow afternoon train, changing trains on the way, and by the time he got to Bath it was about nine o'clock in the evening. The air was very cold and the wind was like a flat blade of ice on his cheeks.

'Excuse me,' he said, 'but is there a fairly cheap hotel not too far away from here?'

'Try the pub down the road,' a man at the station said, pointing. 'They might take you in. It's about a kilometer along on the other side.'

Billy thanked him and picked up his suitcase and set out to walk to the inn. He had never been to Bath before. He didn't know anyone who lived there, but his boss at the Head Office in London had told him it was a splendid city. 'Find your own accommodation,' he had said, 'and then go along and report to the Local Manager as soon as you've got yourself settled.'

Billy was seventeen years old. He was wearing a new dark blue overcoat, a new brown hat, a new brown suit, and he was feeling fine. He walked briskly down the street. He was trying to do everything briskly these days. All successful businessmen, he had decided, were brisk. The top men at Head Office were brisk all the time. They were amazing.

There were no shops on this wide street, only a line of tall houses on each side, all of them looking the same. They had grand entrances and four or five steps going up to their front doors, and it was obvious that they had been very grand houses indeed. But now, even in the darkness, he could see that the paint was coming off the doors and windows, and that the handsome white exteriors had cracks and patches from lack of repair.

Suddenly, in a downstairs window that was illuminated by a nearby street lamp, Billy saw a printed notice leaning against the glass in one of the windows. It said BED AND BREAKFAST.

He stopped walking. He moved a bit closer. Green curtains were hanging down on each side of the window. He went right up to it and looked through the glass into the room, and the first thing he saw was a bright fire burning in the fireplace. On the carpet in front of the fire, a pretty little dog was curled up asleep. The room itself, which he could only see in half-darkness, was filled with pleasant furniture. There was a piano and a big sofa and several comfortable armchairs; and in one corner he saw a large parrot in a cage. Animals were usually a good sign in a place like this, Billy told himself, and it looked to him as if it would be a pretty decent house to stay in. Certainly it would be more comfortable than a pub.

On the other hand, a pub would be more friendly than a guesthouse. There would be beer and cards in the evenings, and lots of people to talk to, and it would probably be a lot cheaper, too. He had stayed a couple of nights in a pub once before and had liked it. He had never stayed in any guesthouses and, to be perfectly honest, he was a tiny bit frightened of them. The word 'guesthouse' suggested watery vegetables and greedy landladies.

After hesitating like this in the cold for two or three minutes, Billy decided that he would walk on and look at the pub before making up his mind. He turned to go.

And now a strange thing happened to him. He was just going to step back and turn away from the window when his eye was caught and held in the most peculiar manner by the small notice that was there. BED AND BREAKFAST, it said. BED AND BREAKFAST, BED AND BREAKFAST. Each word was like a large black eye staring at him through the glass, holding him, forcing him to stay where he was and not to walk away from that house, and the next thing he knew, he was actually moving across from the window to the front door, climbing the steps that led to it and reaching for the bell.

He pressed it. Far away in a back room he heard it ringing, and then at once - it must have been at once because he hadn't even had time to take his finger from the bell-button - the door swung open and a woman was standing there.

She was about forty-five or fifty years old, and the moment she saw him, she gave him a warm welcoming smile.

'Please come in,' she said pleasantly. She stepped to one side, holding the door wide open, and Billy found himself automatically starting forward into the house: the force or, more accurately, the desire to follow her was extraordinarily strong.

'I saw the notice in the window,' he said, holding himself back.

'Yes, I know.'

'I was wondering about a room.'

'It's all ready for you, my dear,' she said. She had a round pink face and very gentle blue eyes.

'I was on my way to a pub,' Billy told her. 'But I noticed the sign in your window.'

'My dear boy,' she said, 'why don't you come in out of the cold?'

'How much do you charge?'

'Nine pounds a night, including breakfast.'

It was amazingly cheap. It was less than half of what he had been willing to pay.

'If that is too much,' she added, 'then perhaps I can reduce it just a tiny bit. Do you desire an egg for breakfast? Eggs are expensive at the moment. It would cost less without the egg.'

'Nine pounds is fine,' he answered. 'I would like very much to stay here.'

'I knew you would. Do come in.'

She seemed terribly nice. She looked exactly like the mother of one's best school friend welcoming one into the house to stay for the Christmas holidays. Billy took off his hat and stepped inside.

'Just hang it there,' she said, 'and let me help you with your coat.'

There were no other hats or coats in the hall. There were no umbrellas, no walking-sticks - nothing.

'We have it all to ourselves,' she said, smiling at him over her shoulder as she led the way upstairs. 'You see, I don't very often have the pleasure of taking a visitor into my little nest.'

The old girl is slightly mad, Billy told himself. But at nine pounds a night, who cares about that? 'I should've thought you'd be simply full of visitors wanting to stay,' he said politely.

'Oh, I am, my dear, I am, of course I am. But the trouble is that I am just a tiny bit careful about whom I choose - if you see what I mean.'

'Ah, yes.'

'But I'm always ready. Everything is always ready day and night in this house just in case an acceptable young gentleman comes along. And it is such a pleasure, my dear, when now and again I open the door and I see someone standing there who is just exactly right.' She was halfway up the stairs, and she paused, turned her head and smiled down at him. 'Like you,' she added, and her blue eyes travelled slowly all the way down the length of Billy's body, to his feet, and then up again.

On the first floor she said to him, 'This floor is mine.'

They climbed up more stairs. 'And this one is all yours,' she said. 'Here's your room. I do hope you'll like it.' She took him into a small but charming front bedroom, switching on the light as she went in.

'The morning sun comes right in the window, Mr Perkins. It is Mr Perkins, isn't it?'

'No,' he said. 'It's Weaver.'

'Mr Weaver. How nice. I've put a hot water bottle between the sheets to warm them, Mr Weaver. And you may light the gas fire at any time if you feel cold.'

'Thank you,' Billy said. 'Thank you very much.' He noticed that the bedclothes had been neatly turned back on one side, all ready for someone to get in.

'I'm so glad you appeared,' she said, looking seriously into his face. 'I was beginning to get worried.'

'That's all right,' Billy answered brightly. 'You mustn't worry about me.' He put his suitcase on the chair and started to open it.

'And what about supper, my dear? Did you manage to get anything to eat before you came here?'

'I'm not hungry, thank you,' he said. 'I think I'll just go to bed as soon as possible because tomorrow I've got to get up rather early and report to the office.'

'Very well, then. I'll leave you now so that you can unpack. But before you go to bed, would you be kind enough to come into the sitting room on the ground floor and sign the book? Everyone has to do that because it's the law, and we don't want to break any laws at this stage in the proceedings, do we?' She gave him a little wave of the hand and went quickly out of the room and closed the door.

The fact that his landlady appeared to be slightly crazy didn't worry Billy at all. She was not only harmless - there was no question about that - but she was also quite obviously a kind and generous person. He guessed that she had probably lost a son of her own or something like that, and had never recovered from it.

So a few minutes later, after unpacking and washing his hands, he walked downstairs to the ground floor and entered the sitting room. His landlady wasn't there, but the fire was still burning and the little dog was still sleeping in front of it. The room was wonderfully warm and comfortable. I'm a lucky fellow, he thought, rubbing his hands. This is great.

He found the guest-book lying open on the piano, so he took out his pen and wrote down his name and address. There were only two other names above his on the page and, as one always does, he started to read them. One was a Christopher MulhoUand from Cardiff. The other was Gregory W. Temple from Bristol.

That's funny, he thought suddenly. Christopher Mulholland. That name sounds familiar.

Now where had he heard that rather unusual name before? Was he a boy at school? No. Was it one of his sister's numerous young men, perhaps, or a friend of his father's? No, no, it wasn't any of those. He glanced down again at the book. In fact, thinking about it again, he wasn't at all sure that the second name wasn't as familiar to him as the first. 'Gregory Temple?' he said aloud, searching his memory. 'Christopher Mulholland...?'

'Such charming boys,' a voice behind him answered, and he turned and saw his landlady walking into the room carrying the tea tray in front of her.

'They sound somehow familiar,' he said.

'They do? How interesting.'

'I'm almost positive I've heard those names before somewhere. Isn't that strange? Maybe it was in the newspapers. They weren't famous in any way, were they? I mean, famous footballers or something like that?'

'Famous,' she said, setting the tray down on the low table in front of the sofa. 'Oh no, I don't think they were famous. But they were extraordinarily handsome, both of them, I can promise you that. They were tall and young and handsome, my dear, just exactly like you.'

Once more, Billy glanced down at the book. 'Look here,' he said, noticing the dates. 'This last entry is over two years old.'

'Is it?'

'Yes, indeed. And Christopher Mulholland's is nearly a year before that - more than three years ago.'

'Oh dear,' she said, shaking her head. 'I never would have thought it. How time flies away from us all, doesn't it, Mr Wilkins?'


The Landlady (1)

Billy Weaver had travelled down from London on the slow afternoon train, changing trains on the way, and by the time he got to Bath it was about nine o'clock in the evening. ビリー・ウィーバーはロンドンから遅い午後の電車で下り、途中で電車を乗り換えていました。彼がバースに着くまでには、夕方の9時頃でした。 The air was very cold and the wind was like a flat blade of ice on his cheeks. 空気はとても冷たく、風は彼の頬に平らな氷の刃のようでした。

'Excuse me,' he said, 'but is there a fairly cheap hotel not too far away from here?' 「すみません」と彼は言いました。「でも、ここからそれほど遠くないところにかなり安いホテルはありますか?」

'Try the pub down the road,' a man at the station said, pointing. 「道を下ってパブを試してみてください」と駅の男が指差しながら言った。 'They might take you in. '彼らはあなたを連れて行くかもしれません。 It's about a kilometer along on the other side.' それは反対側に沿って約1キロです。」

Billy thanked him and picked up his suitcase and set out to walk to the inn. He had never been to Bath before. 彼はこれまでバースに行ったことがありませんでした。 He didn't know anyone who lived there, but his boss at the Head Office in London had told him it was a splendid city. 彼はそこに住んでいる人を誰も知りませんでしたが、ロンドンの本社の彼の上司は彼にそれが素晴らしい都市であると言いました。 'Find your own accommodation,' he had said, 'and then go along and report to the Local Manager as soon as you've got yourself settled.' 「自分の宿泊施設を見つけてください」と彼は言いました。「落ち着いたらすぐに、一緒に行ってローカルマネージャーに報告してください。」

Billy was seventeen years old. He was wearing a new dark blue overcoat, a new brown hat, a new brown suit, and he was feeling fine. He walked briskly down the street. He was trying to do everything briskly these days. 彼は最近すべてを活発にやろうとしていました。 All successful businessmen, he had decided, were brisk. 彼が決めた成功したビジネスマンは皆元気でした。 The top men at Head Office were brisk all the time. They were amazing.

There were no shops on this wide street, only a line of tall houses on each side, all of them looking the same. They had grand entrances and four or five steps going up to their front doors, and it was obvious that they had been very grand houses indeed. 彼らは壮大な入り口と玄関までの4、5段の階段を持っていました、そして彼らが確かに非常に壮大な家であったことは明らかでした。 But now, even in the darkness, he could see that the paint was coming off the doors and windows, and that the handsome white exteriors had cracks and patches from lack of repair. しかし今、暗闇の中でさえ、彼はペンキがドアと窓から剥がれ落ちているのを見ることができました、そしてハンサムな白い外面は修理の欠如からひびとパッチを持っていました。

Suddenly, in a downstairs window that was illuminated by a nearby street lamp, Billy saw a printed notice leaning against the glass in one of the windows. 突然、近くの街灯に照らされた階下の窓で、ビリーは窓の1つにあるガラスに寄りかかっている印刷された通知を見ました。 It said BED AND BREAKFAST.

He stopped walking. He moved a bit closer. 彼は少し近づいた。 Green curtains were hanging down on each side of the window. 緑のカーテンが窓の両側にぶら下がっていました。 He went right up to it and looked through the glass into the room, and the first thing he saw was a bright fire burning in the fireplace. 彼はすぐそこまで行き、ガラス越しに部屋を見ました。彼が最初に見たのは、暖炉で燃えている明るい火でした。 On the carpet in front of the fire, a pretty little dog was curled up asleep. The room itself, which he could only see in half-darkness, was filled with pleasant furniture. 真っ暗闇の中でしか見えなかった部屋自体は、心地よい家具で埋め尽くされていた。 There was a piano and a big sofa and several comfortable armchairs; and in one corner he saw a large parrot in a cage. Animals were usually a good sign in a place like this, Billy told himself, and it looked to him as if it would be a pretty decent house to stay in. ビリーは、このような場所では通常、動物は良い兆候であり、滞在するのにかなりまともな家であるかのように彼に見えました。 Certainly it would be more comfortable than a pub. 確かにそれはパブよりも快適でしょう。

On the other hand, a pub would be more friendly than a guesthouse. There would be beer and cards in the evenings, and lots of people to talk to, and it would probably be a lot cheaper, too. 夕方にはビールやトランプがあり、話をする人もたくさんいて、おそらくもっと安いでしょう。 He had stayed a couple of nights in a pub once before and had liked it. 彼はかつてパブに数泊し、それが好きでした。 He had never stayed in any guesthouses and, to be perfectly honest, he was a tiny bit frightened of them. 彼はどのゲストハウスにも泊まったことがなく、正直言って、彼らを少し怖がっていました。 The word 'guesthouse' suggested watery vegetables and greedy landladies. 「ゲストハウス」という言葉は、水っぽい野菜と貪欲な女将を示唆していました。

After hesitating like this in the cold for two or three minutes, Billy decided that he would walk on and look at the pub before making up his mind. ビリーは、このように寒さの中で2、3分間躊躇した後、決心する前に歩いてパブを見ることにしました。 He turned to go. 彼は行くようになった。

And now a strange thing happened to him. そして今、彼に奇妙なことが起こりました。 He was just going to step back and turn away from the window when his eye was caught and held in the most peculiar manner by the small notice that was there. 彼の目がそこにあった小さな通知によって最も独特な方法で捕らえられて保持されたとき、彼はちょうど後退して窓から離れようとしていました。 BED AND BREAKFAST, it said. BED AND BREAKFAST, BED AND BREAKFAST. Each word was like a large black eye staring at him through the glass, holding him, forcing him to stay where he was and not to walk away from that house, and the next thing he knew, he was actually moving across from the window to the front door, climbing the steps that led to it and reaching for the bell. それぞれの言葉は、大きな黒い目がガラス越しに彼を見つめ、彼を抱きしめ、彼がいる場所に留まり、その家から離れないように強制するようなものでした。次に彼が知ったのは、彼は実際に窓から正面玄関、そこに通じる階段を登り、鐘に手を伸ばす。

He pressed it. Far away in a back room he heard it ringing, and then at once - it must have been at once because he hadn't even had time to take his finger from the bell-button - the door swung open and a woman was standing there. 奥の部屋で彼はそれが鳴っているのを聞いた、そしてすぐに-ベルボタンから指を離す時間がなかったのですぐにあったに違いない-ドアが開き、女性がそこに立っていた。

She was about forty-five or fifty years old, and the moment she saw him, she gave him a warm welcoming smile.

'Please come in,' she said pleasantly. She stepped to one side, holding the door wide open, and Billy found himself automatically starting forward into the house: the force or, more accurately, the desire to follow her was extraordinarily strong. 彼女はドアを大きく開いたまま片側に足を踏み入れ、ビリーは自動的に家の中に前進し始めました。力、より正確には、彼女を追いかけたいという願望は非常に強かったのです。

'I saw the notice in the window,' he said, holding himself back. 「私は窓の中に通知を見た」と彼は身をかがめて言った。

'Yes, I know.'

'I was wondering about a room.' 「私は部屋について疑問に思っていました。」

'It's all ready for you, my dear,' she said. 「それはすべてあなたのために準備ができています、私の愛する人」と彼女は言いました。 She had a round pink face and very gentle blue eyes.

'I was on my way to a pub,' Billy told her. 「私はパブに行く途中だった」とビリーは彼女に言った。 'But I noticed the sign in your window.'

'My dear boy,' she said, 'why don't you come in out of the cold?' 「私の愛する少年」と彼女は言いました。「寒さから抜け出してみませんか?」

'How much do you charge?'

'Nine pounds a night, including breakfast.'

It was amazingly cheap. It was less than half of what he had been willing to pay. それは彼が喜んで支払った金額の半分以下でした。

'If that is too much,' she added, 'then perhaps I can reduce it just a tiny bit. 「それが多すぎる場合は、」と彼女は付け加えました。 Do you desire an egg for breakfast? 朝食に卵が欲しいですか? Eggs are expensive at the moment. 卵は今のところ高価です。 It would cost less without the egg.' 卵がなければ費用は安くなるでしょう。」

'Nine pounds is fine,' he answered. 'I would like very much to stay here.'

'I knew you would. '私はあなたがそうすることを知っていました。 Do come in.' 入ってきてください。'

She seemed terribly nice. She looked exactly like the mother of one's best school friend welcoming one into the house to stay for the Christmas holidays. 彼女は、クリスマス休暇のために家に1人を迎える親友の母親のように見えました。 Billy took off his hat and stepped inside.

'Just hang it there,' she said, 'and let me help you with your coat.' 「ただそこに吊るしてください」と彼女は言いました。

There were no other hats or coats in the hall. There were no umbrellas, no walking-sticks - nothing.

'We have it all to ourselves,' she said, smiling at him over her shoulder as she led the way upstairs. 「私たちはそれをすべて自分たちで持っています」と彼女は言った、彼女が二階への道を導いたとき、彼女は彼女の肩越しに彼に微笑んだ。 'You see, I don't very often have the pleasure of taking a visitor into my little nest.' 「ほら、私は訪問者を私の小さな巣に連れて行く喜びをあまり持っていません。」

The old girl is slightly mad, Billy told himself. But at nine pounds a night, who cares about that? しかし、夜9ポンドで、誰がそれを気にしますか? 'I should've thought you'd be simply full of visitors wanting to stay,' he said politely. 「滞在したい訪問者でいっぱいになると思っていたはずです」と彼は丁寧に言った。

'Oh, I am, my dear, I am, of course I am. 「ああ、私は、私の愛する人、私はもちろん、私です。 But the trouble is that I am just a tiny bit careful about whom I choose - if you see what I mean.' しかし、問題は、私が誰を選ぶかについて少しだけ注意していることです-あなたが私が何を意味するかを見れば。

'Ah, yes.'

'But I'm always ready. Everything is always ready day and night in this house just in case an acceptable young gentleman comes along. 受け入れられる若い紳士がやって来た場合に備えて、この家では昼夜を問わずすべての準備が整っています。 And it is such a pleasure, my dear, when now and again I open the door and I see someone standing there who is just exactly right.' そして、それはとても嬉しいことです、私の愛する人、私が時々ドアを開けると、ちょうどいい人がそこに立っているのを見ます。 She was halfway up the stairs, and she paused, turned her head and smiled down at him. 彼女は階段の途中で立ち止まり、頭を向けて彼に微笑んだ。 'Like you,' she added, and her blue eyes travelled slowly all the way down the length of Billy's body, to his feet, and then up again. 「あなたのように」と彼女は付け加え、彼女の青い目はビリーの体の長さをゆっくりと下って、彼の足まで、そして再び上に移動しました。

On the first floor she said to him, 'This floor is mine.'

They climbed up more stairs. 'And this one is all yours,' she said. 「そしてこれはすべてあなたのものです」と彼女は言いました。 'Here's your room. I do hope you'll like it.' 気に入っていただければ幸いです。」 She took him into a small but charming front bedroom, switching on the light as she went in. 彼女は彼を小さいけれど魅力的な正面の寝室に連れて行き、入ったときに電気をつけた。

'The morning sun comes right in the window, Mr Perkins. It is Mr Perkins, isn't it?' パーキンスさんですよね?」

'No,' he said. 'It's Weaver.'

'Mr Weaver. How nice. I've put a hot water bottle between the sheets to warm them, Mr Weaver. シートの間に湯たんぽを入れて温めました、ウィーバーさん。 And you may light the gas fire at any time if you feel cold.' そして、あなたが寒さを感じるならば、あなたはいつでもガス火をつけることができます。

'Thank you,' Billy said. 'Thank you very much.' He noticed that the bedclothes had been neatly turned back on one side, all ready for someone to get in.

'I'm so glad you appeared,' she said, looking seriously into his face. 'I was beginning to get worried.' 「私は心配し始めていました。」

'That's all right,' Billy answered brightly. 'You mustn't worry about me.' 「あなたは私を心配してはいけません。」 He put his suitcase on the chair and started to open it.

'And what about supper, my dear? 「そして、私の愛する夕食はどうですか? Did you manage to get anything to eat before you came here?' ここに来る前に何か食べるものを手に入れることができましたか?」

'I'm not hungry, thank you,' he said. 'I think I'll just go to bed as soon as possible because tomorrow I've got to get up rather early and report to the office.' 「明日はかなり早く起きてオフィスに報告しなければならないので、できるだけ早く寝るだけだと思います。」

'Very well, then. I'll leave you now so that you can unpack. 開梱できるように、今すぐお任せします。 But before you go to bed, would you be kind enough to come into the sitting room on the ground floor and sign the book? でも、寝る前に、1階の居間に来て本にサインしてくれませんか? Everyone has to do that because it's the law, and we don't want to break any laws at this stage in the proceedings, do we?' それは法律であり、訴訟のこの段階で法律を破りたくないので、誰もがそれをしなければなりませんね?」 She gave him a little wave of the hand and went quickly out of the room and closed the door. 彼女は彼に少し手を振って、すぐに部屋から出てドアを閉めました。

The fact that his landlady appeared to be slightly crazy didn't worry Billy at all. 彼の女将が少し頭がおかしいように見えたという事実は、ビリーをまったく心配しませんでした。 She was not only harmless - there was no question about that - but she was also quite obviously a kind and generous person. 彼女は無害であるだけでなく、それについては疑問の余地はありませんでしたが、明らかに親切で寛大な人でもありました。 He guessed that she had probably lost a son of her own or something like that, and had never recovered from it. 彼は、彼女がおそらく自分の息子かそのようなものを失い、それから回復したことは一度もないと推測しました。

So a few minutes later, after unpacking and washing his hands, he walked downstairs to the ground floor and entered the sitting room. His landlady wasn't there, but the fire was still burning and the little dog was still sleeping in front of it. The room was wonderfully warm and comfortable. I'm a lucky fellow, he thought, rubbing his hands. This is great.

He found the guest-book lying open on the piano, so he took out his pen and wrote down his name and address. There were only two other names above his on the page and, as one always does, he started to read them. ページ上で彼の上に他に2つの名前しかなく、いつものように、彼はそれらを読み始めました。 One was a Christopher MulhoUand from Cardiff. 1つはカーディフのChristopherMulhoUandでした。 The other was Gregory W. Temple from Bristol.

That's funny, he thought suddenly. Christopher Mulholland. That name sounds familiar. その名前はおなじみのようです。

Now where had he heard that rather unusual name before? さて、彼は以前、そのかなり珍しい名前をどこで聞いたことがありますか? Was he a boy at school? No. Was it one of his sister's numerous young men, perhaps, or a friend of his father's? No, no, it wasn't any of those. He glanced down again at the book. In fact, thinking about it again, he wasn't at all sure that the second name wasn't as familiar to him as the first. 実際、もう一度考えてみると、彼は2番目の名前が最初の名前ほど馴染みがないことをまったく確信していませんでした。 'Gregory Temple?' he said aloud, searching his memory. 'Christopher Mulholland...?'

'Such charming boys,' a voice behind him answered, and he turned and saw his landlady walking into the room carrying the tea tray in front of her. 「そんな魅力的な男の子たち」と彼の後ろの声が答えると、彼は振り返ると、女将が彼女の前にお茶のトレーを持って部屋に入ってきたのを見た。

'They sound somehow familiar,' he said.

'They do? How interesting.'

'I'm almost positive I've heard those names before somewhere. 「私はどこかでそれらの名前を聞いたことがあるとほぼ確信しています。 Isn't that strange? Maybe it was in the newspapers. They weren't famous in any way, were they? 彼らは決して有名ではありませんでしたね? I mean, famous footballers or something like that?' つまり、有名なサッカー選手かそのようなものですか?」

'Famous,' she said, setting the tray down on the low table in front of the sofa. 'Oh no, I don't think they were famous. But they were extraordinarily handsome, both of them, I can promise you that. They were tall and young and handsome, my dear, just exactly like you.'

Once more, Billy glanced down at the book. 'Look here,' he said, noticing the dates. 「ここを見てください」と彼は日付に気づいて言った。 'This last entry is over two years old.' 「この最後のエントリは2年以上前のものです。」

'Is it?'

'Yes, indeed. 「はい、確かに。 And Christopher Mulholland's is nearly a year before that - more than three years ago.' そして、クリストファー・マルホランドはそのほぼ1年前、つまり3年以上前です。

'Oh dear,' she said, shaking her head. 'I never would have thought it. How time flies away from us all, doesn't it, Mr Wilkins?' ウィルキンスさん、私たち全員からどのように時間が飛んでいますか?」