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E-Books (english-e-reader), The Damned Thing

The Damned Thing

It was night. Eight men were sitting together in an empty room of a small house. The only pieces of furniture were a simple wooden table and eight chairs. The only light came from a lamp on the table. One of the men was reading a book. He held the book close to the lamp, so that he could see the words on the pages.

There was a ninth man in the room. He owned the house. He was lying on the table, beneath a white sheet. The ninth man was dead.

It was quiet in the house. Outside, there were the sounds of birds and insects in the trees around the house. Visitors from the city always noticed these strange cries and calls. But the men in the room took no notice of these sounds. They heard them every day. Seven of the men were farmers and woodsmen. They worked in the fields and forests every day of the year. The skin on their faces had been burned by the sun and the wind. They were wearing hats with broad brims.

The man with the book did not look like the others. He was not wearing a broad-brimmed hat. His face was smooth, intelligent and handsome. He looked like an educated, important man. He was a coroner.

All of the men were here this evening to do an important job. An inquest was taking place in the room. The men had come to look at the dead body on the table. They had to answer this question: How did this man die?

The coroner was reading a diary. It belonged to the dead man. The coroner and the seven men were waiting for a witness to attend the dead man's inquest.

Suddenly, they heard the sound of a horse galloping on the road. Someone was riding quickly toward the house. The horse stopped outside, the door opened and a young man came in.

"I'm late. I'm sorry," he said.

"We've been waiting for you," said the coroner. "We must finish this job tonight. Hugh Morgan must be buried tomorrow morning. Where have you been?"

"I went to the telegraph office and sent a telegram," said the young man. "I've written a report about Hugh Morgan's death. The report will be in the San Francisco newspapers tomorrow. I'm a reporter. I write stories for the newspapers."

"You're not here to tell us a newspaper story," said the coroner. "You're here to tell us what happened to Mr Morgan. You must tell the truth. You must swear that you'll do this."

"Yes. I'll tell you the truth," said the young man. "Rut you might not believe me."

"That isn't a good beginning," said the coroner. "Is your newspaper report different from the story that you're going to tell us?"

For a moment, the young man had an angry expression on his face. "I've come here to tell you what really happened," he said. "I promise that I'll tell you the truth. Everything that I say to you will be true. You can read what I wrote for the newspaper. These are the true facts. This is what I saw and heard and did. The report isn't fiction."

"Let's begin," said the coroner.

The men took off their hats. The young man lifted his right hand and began to speak slowly and clearly.

"I swear before God. I will tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth," he said.

"What is your name?" asked the coroner.

"William Harker."

"Age?"

"Twenty-seven."

"Did you know the dead man, Hugh Morgan?"

"Yes, I did."

"Were you with him when he died?"

"I was near him."

"Tell us what happened," said the coroner. "Why were you with Mr Morgan, and what did you see?"

"I was visiting him," said Harker. "Morgan and I were good friends. I live in San Francisco, but I often came here to stay with Morgan. We hunted birds and animals in the forest, and we caught fish in the rivers. Morgan and I went hunting and fishing together many times."

"Tell us what happened on the day that Mr Morgan died," said the coroner.

"We left this house at sunrise," said Harker. "We wanted to hunt quails. We took Morgan's dog with us and we both carried shotguns. Morgan told me, 'There's a field of wild oats over the hill. There are many good, large quails there. They'll be good to eat.' So we went to the field. But we found something bigger than quails."

"What do you mean?" asked the coroner. "Did you find an animal?"

"Yes-er-no," said Harker. "I don't know what kind of animal it was. But I saw the oats moving in the field. Something was coming toward us. I couldn't see the animal, but I guessed that it was big. Morgan didn't say anything. He lifted his gun and aimed it at the oats."

Harker stopped speaking and looked toward the window.

"Please continue, Mr Harker," said the coroner. "What happened next?"

"I pointed at the moving plants," replied Harker. "I said, 'Morgan! If that's a deer, you won't be able to kill it with a shotgun. You'll need a more powerful gun-a rifle. But maybe it's something bigger than a deer. It might be a bear, or a mountain lion!' But Morgan didn't reply. He just aimed his gun at the oats and stared. I began to be afraid. Our shotguns wouldn't stop an angry bear or a lion."

"Mr Harker, you say that it was a big animal," said the coroner. "Do you know the difference between a bear and a lion and a deer?"

"Yes, I do, sir," said the young man quickly and angrily. "And that's the strangest part of this story. I saw the oats moving. And I heard something coming through the plants. But I couldn't see what it was. A big thing was moving toward us, but I couldn't see it."

"Did you speak to Mr Morgan again?" asked the coroner. "Yes," said Harker. "I shouted, 'What is it?' But Morgan didn't reply. The animal-or thing-was coming closer and Morgan got ready to fire his gun. Suddenly he said, 'It's that Damned Thing!' He was terrified."

"Did Mr Morgan know what it was?" asked the coroner. "Is that what you believe, Mr Harker?"

"Yes, sir," Harker replied. "I believe that Morgan had seen it before. Then he fired his gun and I heard a terrible sound. It was the scream of a wild animal."

"And did you fire your gun too?" asked the coroner.

"No, I didn't. I couldn't," replied Harker. "The smoke from Morgan's gun was in my eyes. I couldn't see where to aim my own gun. Then, suddenly, Morgan dropped his gun and started to run."

"He left you ?" asked the coroner.

"Well, I was surprised," said Harker. "But I didn't have time to think about it. Something knocked me to the ground."

"What knocked you down?" asked the coroner.

"Well, I didn't see it. But it was soft and heavy. It moved very fast."

"And then what happened?"

"I heard wild screams near me. They were like the sounds made by dogs who are fighting. Then I saw that Morgan was fighting. He was on the ground. He was fighting for his life."

"Fighting what?" asked the coroner.

"I-I don't know," said the young man. "I couldn't see anything, or anyone. But Morgan was on the ground and there was a strange movement in the air around him. I don't know how to describe it. It seemed as if the fight was happening under water. Sometimes I couldn't see one of Morgan's hands. Sometimes his head disappeared. Then his whole body moved again."

"And did you try to help Mr Morgan?" asked the coroner.

"Of course I did. I ran toward him. But I found him like this..." Harker pointed to the dead body on the table.

"And where was the animal?" asked the coroner.

"I don't know. I only saw the oats moving again. They moved as if there was wind blowing across them. The thing- whatever it was-went into the woods. My friend was dead. I came into town to get a police officer."

"Very well," said the coroner, "we'll examine the body."

He lifted the white sheet off Morgan's body. Then he removed a handkerchief that was tied around the dead man's head. The handkerchief kept Morgan's mouth closed. The other men looked closely. One of them held the lamp high.

Its light shone on the body of the dead man.

Hugh Morgan's throat had been torn open. There were many terrible deep injuries all over his body. His clothes were soaked with blood.

"Gentlemen, you've heard Mr Harker's story," said the coroner. "You've seen Mr Morgan's body. What shall we write on the death certificate? Did a wild animal kill Mr Morgan, or was he murdered? We must decide."

The seven men went out of the room and spoke together quietly for two or three minutes.

William Harker turned toward the coroner.

"I see that you have Morgan's diary, sir," he said. "Have you read it? Does it tell us anything important?"

"I've read it quickly," said the coroner, "No, it doesn't tell us anything about the cause of Mr Morgan's death."

The seven men came back into the room. One of them stood in front of the coroner and spoke.

"We believe that Hugh Morgan was killed by a mountain lion," he said.

"Thank you, gentlemen," said the coroner. "Everyone can leave now. Mr Morgan will be buried in the morning. I'll send for an undertaker."

That was the end of the inquest. But it was not quite the end of the story.

William Harker was a writer. He wanted to read Hugh Morgan's diary and write a story about his friend's death. He stayed in the town after Morgan was buried. A few days later, Morgan's property and belongings were sold. William Harker bought the diary.

Hugh Morgan had been a lonely man who had written all his thoughts in his diary. But he had not always written days and dates in the diary. And some of the pages in the book were torn. Other pages were missing. This is what Morgan had written before his death:

My dog is behaving strangely. He barks and turns around again and again. He looks at something that isn't there. He runs after something that he can't see. This has happened several times.

1 September

Tonight, I was looking at the stars in the sky above the hill. Then something strange happened. Someone-or something-moved between me and the stars. The stars suddenly looked like a pool when you drop a stone in the water. Am I going crazy?

27 September

It's been here again. It moves around the house. Now I keep my gun beside me always. Does this Thing only come at night? Today I saw footprints in the soft ground, near the house. What's happening here? Am I going crazy?

2 October

I shall not leave my home. I will not run away because of this Thing. But it might make me crazy.

5 October

I've invited my friend, Harker, to stay here. I'll say nothing. Maybe he'll find an answer. Maybe he'll see the Thing too.

Can the dog see it? I'm sure that the dog hears it. It hears things that I can't hear. Can the dog see things that I can't see? Perhaps that is the answer. If there are sounds that men can't hear, are there colors that men can't see? Is the Damned Thing a color that men can't see?

- THE END -


The Damned Thing

It was night. Eight men were sitting together in an empty room of a small house. The only pieces of furniture were a simple wooden table and eight chairs. 家具はシンプルな木製のテーブルと椅子8脚だけでした。 The only light came from a lamp on the table. 唯一の光はテーブルのランプから来ました。 One of the men was reading a book. He held the book close to the lamp, so that he could see the words on the pages. 彼は本をランプの近くに持って、ページの言葉を見ることができた。

There was a ninth man in the room. 部屋には9人目の男がいました。 He owned the house. 彼はその家を所有していた。 He was lying on the table, beneath a white sheet. The ninth man was dead.

It was quiet in the house. Outside, there were the sounds of birds and insects in the trees around the house. 外では、家の周りの木々に鳥や虫の鳴き声が聞こえました。 Visitors from the city always noticed these strange cries and calls. 街からの訪問者はいつもこれらの奇妙な叫び声と呼びかけに気づきました。 But the men in the room took no notice of these sounds. しかし、部屋の男たちはこれらの音に気づかなかった。 They heard them every day. Seven of the men were farmers and woodsmen. They worked in the fields and forests every day of the year. 彼らは一年中毎日畑や森で働いていました。 The skin on their faces had been burned by the sun and the wind. 彼らの顔の皮膚は太陽と風によって焼かれていました。 They were wearing hats with broad brims. 彼らはつばの広い帽子をかぶっていた。

The man with the book did not look like the others. その本を持っている人は他の人のようには見えなかった。 He was not wearing a broad-brimmed hat. His face was smooth, intelligent and handsome. He looked like an educated, important man. 彼は教養のある重要な人のように見えた。 He was a coroner. 彼は検死官でした。

All of the men were here this evening to do an important job. An inquest was taking place in the room. 部屋で死因審問が行われていた。 The men had come to look at the dead body on the table. 男たちはテーブルの上の死体を見に来ていた。 They had to answer this question: How did this man die? 彼らはこの質問に答えなければなりませんでした:この男はどのように死んだのですか?

The coroner was reading a diary. It belonged to the dead man. The coroner and the seven men were waiting for a witness to attend the dead man's inquest. 検死官と7人の男性は、目撃者が死者の死因審問に出席するのを待っていました。

Suddenly, they heard the sound of a horse galloping on the road. Someone was riding quickly toward the house. 誰かが家に向かって急いで乗っていました。 The horse stopped outside, the door opened and a young man came in.

"I'm late. I'm sorry," he said.

"We've been waiting for you," said the coroner. 「私たちはあなたを待っていました」とコロナーは言いました。 "We must finish this job tonight. 「私たちは今夜この仕事を終えなければなりません。 Hugh Morgan must be buried tomorrow morning. ヒュー・モーガンは明日の朝に埋葬されなければなりません。 Where have you been?" あなたはどこにいた?"

"I went to the telegraph office and sent a telegram," said the young man. "I've written a report about Hugh Morgan's death. 「ヒュー・モーガンの死についてのレポートを書きました。 The report will be in the San Francisco newspapers tomorrow. I'm a reporter. I write stories for the newspapers." 新聞の記事を書いています。」

"You're not here to tell us a newspaper story," said the coroner. 「あなたは私たちに新聞記事を話すためにここにいるのではありません」とコロナーは言いました。 "You're here to tell us what happened to Mr Morgan. 「あなたはモーガン氏に何が起こったのかを私たちに話すためにここにいます。 You must tell the truth. あなたは真実を言わなければなりません。 You must swear that you'll do this." あなたはこれをすることを誓わなければなりません。」

"Yes. I'll tell you the truth," said the young man. "Rut you might not believe me." 「しかし、あなたは私を信じないかもしれません。」

"That isn't a good beginning," said the coroner. 「それは良い始まりではない」とコロナーは言った。 "Is your newspaper report different from the story that you're going to tell us?" 「あなたの新聞の報道は、あなたが私たちに話そうとしている話とは違うのですか?」

For a moment, the young man had an angry expression on his face. しばらくの間、若い男は彼の顔に怒った表情をしていました。 "I've come here to tell you what really happened," he said. 「私は実際に何が起こったのかをあなたに話すためにここに来た」と彼は言った。 "I promise that I'll tell you the truth. 「私はあなたに真実を話すことを約束します。 Everything that I say to you will be true. 私があなたに言うことはすべて真実です。 You can read what I wrote for the newspaper. 私が新聞に書いたものを読むことができます。 These are the true facts. This is what I saw and heard and did. これは私が見聞きし、したことです。 The report isn't fiction." レポートはフィクションではありません。」

"Let's begin," said the coroner.

The men took off their hats. The young man lifted his right hand and began to speak slowly and clearly. 若い男は右手を持ち上げ、ゆっくりとはっきりと話し始めました。

"I swear before God. 「私は神の前で誓います。 I will tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth," he said. 私は真実、真実全体、そして真実以外の何物でもない」と述べた。

"What is your name?" asked the coroner.

"William Harker."

"Age?"

"Twenty-seven."

"Did you know the dead man, Hugh Morgan?" 「死んだ男、ヒュー・モーガンを知っていましたか?」

"Yes, I did."

"Were you with him when he died?" 「彼が死んだとき、あなたは彼と一緒でしたか?」

"I was near him." 「私は彼の近くにいました。」

"Tell us what happened," said the coroner. "Why were you with Mr Morgan, and what did you see?" 「なぜモーガンさんと一緒にいたのですか、そして何を見ましたか?」

"I was visiting him," said Harker. "Morgan and I were good friends. I live in San Francisco, but I often came here to stay with Morgan. We hunted birds and animals in the forest, and we caught fish in the rivers. Morgan and I went hunting and fishing together many times."

"Tell us what happened on the day that Mr Morgan died," said the coroner.

"We left this house at sunrise," said Harker. "We wanted to hunt quails. We took Morgan's dog with us and we both carried shotguns. Morgan told me, 'There's a field of wild oats over the hill. モーガンは私に言った、「丘の上に野生のオーツ麦の畑があります。 There are many good, large quails there. They'll be good to eat.' 彼らは食べてもいいでしょう。」 So we went to the field. But we found something bigger than quails." しかし、ウズラよりも大きなものを見つけました。」

"What do you mean?" asked the coroner. "Did you find an animal?"

"Yes-er-no," said Harker. 「はい、えー、いいえ」とハーカーは言った。 "I don't know what kind of animal it was. But I saw the oats moving in the field. しかし、私はオーツ麦が畑を移動しているのを見ました。 Something was coming toward us. I couldn't see the animal, but I guessed that it was big. 動物は見えませんでしたが、大きいと思いました。 Morgan didn't say anything. He lifted his gun and aimed it at the oats." 彼は銃を持ち上げてオーツ麦に向けた。」

Harker stopped speaking and looked toward the window.

"Please continue, Mr Harker," said the coroner. "What happened next?"

"I pointed at the moving plants," replied Harker. 「私は動いている植物を指さした」とハーカーは答えた。 "I said, 'Morgan! If that's a deer, you won't be able to kill it with a shotgun. それが鹿の場合、ショットガンでそれを殺すことはできません。 You'll need a more powerful gun-a rifle. But maybe it's something bigger than a deer. It might be a bear, or a mountain lion!' クマかもしれないし、マウンテンライオンかもしれない!」 But Morgan didn't reply. しかし、モーガンは返事をしなかった。 He just aimed his gun at the oats and stared. 彼はちょうど彼の銃をオーツ麦に向けて見つめた。 I began to be afraid. Our shotguns wouldn't stop an angry bear or a lion." 私たちのショットガンは怒っているクマやライオンを止めませんでした。」

"Mr Harker, you say that it was a big animal," said the coroner. 「ハーカーさん、あなたはそれが大きな動物だったと言います」とコロナーは言いました。 "Do you know the difference between a bear and a lion and a deer?" 「クマとライオンと鹿の違いを知っていますか?」

"Yes, I do, sir," said the young man quickly and angrily. "And that's the strangest part of this story. 「そして、それはこの物語の最も奇妙な部分です。 I saw the oats moving. And I heard something coming through the plants. そして、私は植物を通して何かがやってくるのを聞いた。 But I couldn't see what it was. A big thing was moving toward us, but I couldn't see it."

"Did you speak to Mr Morgan again?" 「モーガンさんとまた話しましたか?」 asked the coroner. "Yes," said Harker. "I shouted, 'What is it?' But Morgan didn't reply. The animal-or thing-was coming closer and Morgan got ready to fire his gun. 動物(または物)が近づいてきて、モーガンは銃を撃つ準備をしました。 Suddenly he said, 'It's that Damned Thing!' 突然彼は言った、「それはそのくそったれだ!」 He was terrified." 彼はおびえていました。」

"Did Mr Morgan know what it was?" 「モーガン氏はそれが何であったか知っていましたか?」 asked the coroner. "Is that what you believe, Mr Harker?" 「それはあなたが信じていることですか、ハーカーさん?」

"Yes, sir," Harker replied. "I believe that Morgan had seen it before. 「モーガンは以前にそれを見たことがあったと思います。 Then he fired his gun and I heard a terrible sound. It was the scream of a wild animal." 野生動物の悲鳴だった」と語った。

"And did you fire your gun too?" 「そして、あなたもあなたの銃を発射しましたか?」 asked the coroner.

"No, I didn't. I couldn't," replied Harker. "The smoke from Morgan's gun was in my eyes. I couldn't see where to aim my own gun. 自分の銃をどこに向ければいいのかわからなかった。 Then, suddenly, Morgan dropped his gun and started to run." それから突然、モーガンは銃を落とし、走り始めました。」

"He left you ?" asked the coroner.

"Well, I was surprised," said Harker. "But I didn't have time to think about it. 「しかし、私はそれについて考える時間がありませんでした。 Something knocked me to the ground." 何かが私を地面に叩きつけた。」

"What knocked you down?" asked the coroner.

"Well, I didn't see it. But it was soft and heavy. しかし、それは柔らかくて重いものでした。 It moved very fast."

"And then what happened?"

"I heard wild screams near me. 「近くで激しい悲鳴が聞こえた。 They were like the sounds made by dogs who are fighting. 戦っている犬の鳴き声のようでした。 Then I saw that Morgan was fighting. それから私はモーガンが戦っていたのを見ました。 He was on the ground. 彼は地面にいた。 He was fighting for his life." 彼は自分の人生のために戦っていた。」

"Fighting what?" 「何と戦うの?」 asked the coroner.

"I-I don't know," said the young man. "I couldn't see anything, or anyone. 「何も見えなかったし、誰も見えなかった。 But Morgan was on the ground and there was a strange movement in the air around him. しかし、モーガンは地面にいて、彼の周りの空中で奇妙な動きがありました。 I don't know how to describe it. どう説明したらいいのかわからない。 It seemed as if the fight was happening under water. まるで水中で戦いが起こっているように見えた。 Sometimes I couldn't see one of Morgan's hands. 時々私はモーガンの片方の手を見ることができませんでした。 Sometimes his head disappeared. 時々彼の頭が消えた。 Then his whole body moved again." それから彼の全身は再び動いた。」

"And did you try to help Mr Morgan?" 「そして、モーガン氏を助けようとしましたか?」 asked the coroner.

"Of course I did. I ran toward him. But I found him like this..." Harker pointed to the dead body on the table.

"And where was the animal?" 「そして、動物はどこにいましたか?」 asked the coroner.

"I don't know. I only saw the oats moving again. オート麦がまた動くのを見ただけです。 They moved as if there was wind blowing across them. 彼らはまるで風が吹いているかのように動いた。 The thing- whatever it was-went into the woods. 物事は-それが何であれ-森の中に行きました。 My friend was dead. I came into town to get a police officer." 警察官を雇うために町にやってきた」と語った。

"Very well," said the coroner, "we'll examine the body." 「よくできました。体を調べます」とコロナーは言った。

He lifted the white sheet off Morgan's body. Then he removed a handkerchief that was tied around the dead man's head. それから彼は死んだ男の頭の周りに結ばれていたハンカチを取り除いた。 The handkerchief kept Morgan's mouth closed. ハンカチはモーガンの口を閉じたままにした。 The other men looked closely. One of them held the lamp high. それらの1つはランプを高く保持しました。

Its light shone on the body of the dead man. その光は死んだ男の体を照らしていました。

Hugh Morgan's throat had been torn open. ヒュー・モーガンの喉は引き裂かれていました。 There were many terrible deep injuries all over his body. His clothes were soaked with blood. 彼の服は血だらけだった。

"Gentlemen, you've heard Mr Harker's story," said the coroner. "You've seen Mr Morgan's body. What shall we write on the death certificate? 死亡診断書には何を書こうか? Did a wild animal kill Mr Morgan, or was he murdered? 野生動物はモーガン氏を殺しましたか、それとも彼は殺害されましたか? We must decide."

The seven men went out of the room and spoke together quietly for two or three minutes. 7人の男性は部屋を出て、2、3分間静かに話しました。

William Harker turned toward the coroner. ウィリアム・ハーカーはコロナーの方を向いた。

"I see that you have Morgan's diary, sir," he said. 「あなたはモーガンの日記を持っているようです、サー」と彼は言った。 "Have you read it? Does it tell us anything important?" 重要なことを教えてくれますか?」

"I've read it quickly," said the coroner, "No, it doesn't tell us anything about the cause of Mr Morgan's death." 「私はそれをすぐに読みました。いいえ、それはモーガン氏の死の原因について私たちに何も教えてくれません」とコロナーは言いました。

The seven men came back into the room. 7人の男が部屋に戻ってきた。 One of them stood in front of the coroner and spoke. そのうちの一人は検死官の前に立って話しました。

"We believe that Hugh Morgan was killed by a mountain lion," he said.

"Thank you, gentlemen," said the coroner. "Everyone can leave now. Mr Morgan will be buried in the morning. モーガン氏は午前中に埋葬されます。 I'll send for an undertaker." 葬儀屋に送ります。」

That was the end of the inquest. それが審問の終わりでした。 But it was not quite the end of the story. しかし、それは話の終わりではありませんでした。

William Harker was a writer. He wanted to read Hugh Morgan's diary and write a story about his friend's death. He stayed in the town after Morgan was buried. モーガンが埋葬された後、彼は町にとどまった。 A few days later, Morgan's property and belongings were sold. 数日後、モーガンの所有物と所持品が売却されました。 William Harker bought the diary. ウィリアム・ハーカーが日記を買いました。

Hugh Morgan had been a lonely man who had written all his thoughts in his diary. ヒュー・モーガンは彼の日記に彼の考えをすべて書いた孤独な男でした。 But he had not always written days and dates in the diary. しかし、彼はいつも日記に日と日付を書いていませんでした。 And some of the pages in the book were torn. そして、本のいくつかのページが破れました。 Other pages were missing. This is what Morgan had written before his death: これはモーガンが彼の死の前に書いたものです:

My dog is behaving strangely. 私の犬は奇妙な振る舞いをしています。 He barks and turns around again and again. 彼は吠え、何度も何度も振り返ります。 He looks at something that isn't there. 彼はそこにない何かを見ています。 He runs after something that he can't see. 彼は見えない何かを追いかけます。 This has happened several times.

1 September

Tonight, I was looking at the stars in the sky above the hill. Then something strange happened. Someone-or something-moved between me and the stars. 誰か-または何か-が私と星の間を移動しました。 The stars suddenly looked like a pool when you drop a stone in the water. 水に石を落とすと、突然星がプールのように見えました。 Am I going crazy?

27 September

It's been here again. 再びここに来ました。 It moves around the house. Now I keep my gun beside me always. Does this Thing only come at night? この事は夜だけ来るのですか? Today I saw footprints in the soft ground, near the house. What's happening here? Am I going crazy?

2 October

I shall not leave my home. 私は家を出ません。 I will not run away because of this Thing. But it might make me crazy.

5 October

I've invited my friend, Harker, to stay here. I'll say nothing. 何も言わない。 Maybe he'll find an answer. 多分彼は答えを見つけるでしょう。 Maybe he'll see the Thing too. 多分彼は物事も見るでしょう。

Can the dog see it? 犬はそれを見ることができますか? I'm sure that the dog hears it. 犬はそれを聞いていると確信しています。 It hears things that I can't hear. 聞こえないものが聞こえます。 Can the dog see things that I can't see? 犬は私が見ることができないものを見ることができますか? Perhaps that is the answer. If there are sounds that men can't hear, are there colors that men can't see? 男性には聞こえない音があるとしたら、男性には見えない色はありますか? Is the Damned Thing a color that men can't see? ダムドシングは男性には見えない色ですか?

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