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E-Books (english-e-reader), Rain Man Chapter 1-5 (2)

Rain Man Chapter 1-5 (2)

'Could you please tell me the name of the person who will get my father's money?' Charlie asked politely.

'I'm sorry. I cannot tell you that.' Just like Mooney.

'Why is it a secret?' Charlie left his chair and went over to stand by the window. 'Is this person... an old girlfriend of Dad's?'

From the window, Charlie could see the old Buick. Susanna was sitting in the back, enjoying the afternoon sun. A small man, carrying a bag, moved towards the car. He walked in a strange way, moving from side to side.

'Mr Babbitt, I knew your father from the time you were two years old,' Dr Bruner said softly.

Charlie turned. 'The year my mother died,' he said quickly.

'Yes,' said Bruner. 'Now, the will names me as the person to look after the money. But this hospital and I get none of that money. I am doing this for your father.'

Charlie was beginning to feel very angry. To calm himself, he turned back to the window. The man with the bag was now standing next to the Buick. 'And you want me to just forget about the money?'

'I think you have been upset,' Bruner said softly, 'by a. man who never knew how to show love.'

Charlie knew that this was true. He did not know what to say. Outside, the man was taking a small notebook out of his bag. He began writing in it.

'I understand how you feel,' Dr Bruner continued. 'But there's nothing I can do.'

'I'll fight for my money, Dr Bruner,' Charlie said.

Dr Bruner got up from his chair. 'I'm sure you are a fighter, Mr Babbitt,' he said. 'Your father was a fighter. But I am a fighter too.'

Dr Bruner walked with Charlie out through the front door. The day was getting hotter, but it was still beautiful weather.

The little man with the bag was still standing by the Buick. He was writing in his notebook. Again and again he looked from the car back to the notebook. He did not look at Susanna.

'Raymond,' said Dr Bruner, 'go back inside.'

The man with the notebook was not listening. He continued writing in the notebook. Charlie walked past him and went to open the door.

'Of course, this car is not white,' Raymond said. He did not look up from his notebook. 'This is a blue car now...'

Charlie looked at Raymond in surprise. He was a small man of about forty. He looked clean and tidy, with short hair and very ordinary clothes. What was a little strange was that there was no expression on his face. There was no light in his small black eyes, and no movement in his mouth. It was a face that was neither happy nor sad.

Smiling, Charlie turned to Susanna. 'You know,' he said slowly, 'this car was white. My dad painted it blue when I was very little.'

'And, and,' Raymond continued quickly to himself, '... it cost an arm and a leg.'

The smile left Charlie's face. 'That's what my father often said - "an arm and a leg". How does this man know that?' he asked.

Charlie looked at the man called Raymond. Raymond looked up for a second. Then he looked at his notebook again,

'You come with me, Raymond,' Dr Bruner said. 'These people have to go.'

But Charlie was moving closer to Raymond. 'Do you know this car?' he asked.

A frightened expression came across Raymond's face. He looked at Dr Bruner for help. 'I... don't... know,' he muttered.

'Yes, you do know this car!' Charlie said angrily. 'Why do you know?'

'That's enough, Mr Babbitt,' Dr Bruner said. 'You're upsetting him. You're -'

'Charlie, please,' Susanna said.

Now Raymond looked from Susanna to Dr Bruner. He began writing in his notebook and muttering to himself.

'Babbitt Charlie. Charlie... Babbitt. Charlie Babbitt. 1961 Beechcrest Avenue.'

Charlie was astonished. 'How do you know that address?' he asked.

Dr Bruner spoke quietly. 'Because he's your brother,' he said.

'But I don't have a brother,' the astonished Charlie said. 'I never had a brother.'

CHAPTER FOUR

Charlie and Dr Bruner walked through the flower garden and talked together. Susanna sat with Raymond, who was still writing in his notebook.

'What can I tell you?' the doctor asked.

'Where to begin?'

'What does he write in that notebook?'

'He writes down things that he thinks are dangerous. Things like bad weather reports.'

'Why does he do that?'

'I think he writes dangerous things down to try and hide them. Raymond sees danger everywhere. Any change frightens him. That is why he always does things in the same way every day.'

'What do you mean?'

'Raymond always eats the same way, sleeps the same way, talks the same way. Everything. But he's a person, your brother. In some ways, a very intelligent person.'

Dr Bruner looked at Charlie for a second or two, then he continued. 'Raymond cannot have relationships with other people, and he cannot see the relationship between things. He talks to you, but he also talks to the car and the television. Everything is the same to him. Doctors call this sort of person autistic.'

Charlie thought about this. It was difficult to understand.

'And the most important thing is that Raymond can't feel. He cannot be happy or sad in the way that we are happy or sad.'

Dr Bruner stopped speaking and looked at Charlie. Charlie was biting his lip and looking over at his brother.

'What Raymond did with you today... that was very good,' Dr Bruner said softly. 'Very good. For a stranger.'

Charlie shook his head and laughed. 'The world is strange,' he said. 'Three million dollars! What's he going to spend it on?'

It was late afternoon. Charlie was walking with Raymond. Susanna waited in the car. She thought that Charlie was saying goodbye to his new brother.

Charlie walked quickly towards the Buick. Raymond walked next to him.

'This is Daddy's car,' Raymond said. 'It was white. But now this is a blue car.'

Charlie got into the Buick. 'Get in, Raymond,' he said.

Raymond got into the car.

'Charlie, wait a minute!' Susanna said. 'Where are we taking him?'

'For a holiday,' Charlie said. He started the car and they drove away. Raymond looked back over his shoulder at the house that they were leaving. There was no expression on his face, but it was very clear that he was anxious.

'Don't worry, Raymond,' Susanna told him, 'you're coming back.'

Charlie said nothing.

CHAPTER FIVE

They drove back to Cincinnati. Raymond sat in the back of the Buick and watched the road go by. He said nothing to Charlie or Susanna, but muttered strange things to himself.

They went to a hotel, and took two rooms. Charlie showed Raymond his room.

'This is your room, Ray,' he said.

That was a big mistake.

Raymond looked around the room. 'This is not my room,' he said. There was a frightened expression on his face. 'This is... is not my room.'

'Just for tonight,' Charlie said.

'Until we take you home,' Susanna said.

But Raymond was very upset now. He was shaking his head from side to side and muttering to himself. 'Of course, I'm going to be here a long time. A very long time... Of course, they moved my bed.'

'Sorry, Raymond,' Charlie said. 'You like the bed under the window.' He started pushing the bed into its new place.

But Raymond was still unhappy. He started muttering about books. The only book in the room was a telephone book for Cincinnati.

'Charlie, let's take him home,' Susanna said. She liked Raymond, and she did not like to see him upset.

'He's OK,' Charlie said. 'Do you like pizza, Ray?'

'Do you like pizza, Charlie Babbitt?' Raymond knew the word 'pizza' because 'pizza' was a Wallbrook word. This calmed him a little.

'I'll ask the hotel to send a pizza up to your room,' Charlie said. 'We like pizza, don't we, Ray? We're brothers.'

'Charlie, he still doesn't look happy,' Susanna said. 'I don't understand why you brought him here. I think he wants to go back to Wallbrook.'

'Ray's fine,' Charlie said, 'all he needs is some TV and some pizza. What's on TV, Ray?'

Raymond looked at his watch. 'The Lucky Money Wheel,' he told the watch.

'Great. Sit down, and you can watch it.'

Charlie turned on the television. The Lucky Money Wheel came on.

'You've got your TV,' Charlie said. 'You've got a pizza coming. Aren't things good, Ray?'

Charlie looked at Raymond and Raymond looked at Charlie, but there was no expression on his face.

'Do you ever smile, Ray?' Charlie asked.

'Do you ever smile?' Raymond repeated. There was still no expression on his face.

Raymond sat on his bed and watched television. Charlie came in with a pizza.

Ray looked at the pizza and shook his head. 'What's the problem, Ray?' Charlie asked.

Raymond wanted to eat the pizza the way that he ate it at Wallbrook. Charlie cut the pizza into tiny squares for him, and put each square on a toothpick.

Charlie and Susanna went off to their room. Raymond watched a film. A man in the film told his son to turn the television off. Raymond got up and turned his television off.

Raymond continued to look at the television, but now there was nothing to watch. He heard the sound of another television in Charlie and Susanna's room. Raymond got up and went into their room.

Charlie and Susanna were in bed. They did not see Raymond come into the room. Raymond sat on the end of the bed and watched the television.

Susanna saw him first. 'Charlie,' she said, in a quiet voice. 'Raymond is sitting at the end of the bed.'

Charlie sat up and saw that Raymond was watching TV and eating pizza. 'Raymond, what are you doing in here?' he shouted. 'Get out!'

Raymond got up and went back to his room. Susanna looked at Charlie with an angry expression on her face. 'Go and talk to him!' she said.

'What for?' Charlie asked.

'Because he's frightened,' Susanna said. 'He's never been away from Wallbrook before. You've upset him!'

Charlie got angry. 'Raymond is not going back to Wallbrook,' he said. 'He has to learn how to live in the real world.'

Susanna was astonished. 'What do you mean he's not going back to Wallbrook?'

Charlie looked away from her and bit his lip. 'I took Raymond,' he said quietly, 'and I'm keeping him until I get my money.'

Susanna's eyes widened. 'What money?' she asked.

'Dad left Ray some money. A lot of money.'

Money! Now Susanna was beginning to understand. 'How much money... did... your... father... leave Raymond?' she asked angrily.

Charlie looked away again. 'He left him his house and all his money,' he said. 'Three million dollars.'

Susanna muttered some angry words in Italian and jumped out of bed. Then, she picked up her suitcase from the floor and threw it open.

'What are you doing?' Charlie asked.

'I'm leaving you, Charlie.' She was coldly angry.

Now Charlie was astonished. 'Why?' he asked.

Susanna pushed her things into the suitcase and pulled on her coat. 'Because you've kidnapped your brother for money,' she shouted.

'I have not kidnapped him! I just want my money. What's wrong with that?'

'Everything!' Susanna shouted. She looked at Charlie for a second and shook her head. Then she picked up her suitcase and moved towards the door. When she got to the door, she turned and looked at Charlie again. 'I did love you, Charlie,' she said sadly. 'But you are not the man that I thought you were.'


Rain Man Chapter 1-5 (2)

'Could you please tell me the name of the person who will get my father's money?' Charlie asked politely.

'I'm sorry. I cannot tell you that.' Just like Mooney. ムーニーのように。

'Why is it a secret?' Charlie left his chair and went over to stand by the window. 'Is this person... an old girlfriend of Dad's?'

From the window, Charlie could see the old Buick. Susanna was sitting in the back, enjoying the afternoon sun. A small man, carrying a bag, moved towards the car. He walked in a strange way, moving from side to side. 彼は奇妙な方法で歩き、左右に動いた。

'Mr Babbitt, I knew your father from the time you were two years old,' Dr Bruner said softly.

Charlie turned. 'The year my mother died,' he said quickly.

'Yes,' said Bruner. 'Now, the will names me as the person to look after the money. 「今、意志は私をお金の世話をする人として指名します。 But this hospital and I get none of that money. I am doing this for your father.'

Charlie was beginning to feel very angry. To calm himself, he turned back to the window. 落ち着くために、彼は窓に戻った。 The man with the bag was now standing next to the Buick. 'And you want me to just forget about the money?'

'I think you have been upset,' Bruner said softly, 'by a. man who never knew how to show love.' 「私はあなたが動揺していると思います」とブルーナーはそっと言いました。愛を示す方法を知らなかった男。」

Charlie knew that this was true. He did not know what to say. Outside, the man was taking a small notebook out of his bag. He began writing in it.

'I understand how you feel,' Dr Bruner continued. 'But there's nothing I can do.' 「しかし、私にできることは何もありません。」

'I'll fight for my money, Dr Bruner,' Charlie said.

Dr Bruner got up from his chair. 'I'm sure you are a fighter, Mr Babbitt,' he said. 'Your father was a fighter. But I am a fighter too.'

Dr Bruner walked with Charlie out through the front door. The day was getting hotter, but it was still beautiful weather.

The little man with the bag was still standing by the Buick. He was writing in his notebook. Again and again he looked from the car back to the notebook. 何度も何度も彼は車からノートブックに戻って見ました。 He did not look at Susanna.

'Raymond,' said Dr Bruner, 'go back inside.'

The man with the notebook was not listening. He continued writing in the notebook. Charlie walked past him and went to open the door.

'Of course, this car is not white,' Raymond said. He did not look up from his notebook. 'This is a blue car now...'

Charlie looked at Raymond in surprise. He was a small man of about forty. He looked clean and tidy, with short hair and very ordinary clothes. 彼はきれいで整頓されていて、短い髪とごく普通の服を着ていました。 What was a little strange was that there was no expression on his face. 少し不思議なことに、彼の顔には表情がありませんでした。 There was no light in his small black eyes, and no movement in his mouth. It was a face that was neither happy nor sad.

Smiling, Charlie turned to Susanna. 'You know,' he said slowly, 'this car was white. My dad painted it blue when I was very little.'

'And, and,' Raymond continued quickly to himself, '... it cost an arm and a leg.' 「そして、そして、」レイモンドはすぐに彼自身に続けました、「...それは腕と足を要しました。」

The smile left Charlie's face. 'That's what my father often said - "an arm and a leg". How does this man know that?' he asked.

Charlie looked at the man called Raymond. Raymond looked up for a second. Then he looked at his notebook again,

'You come with me, Raymond,' Dr Bruner said. 'These people have to go.'

But Charlie was moving closer to Raymond. 'Do you know this car?' he asked.

A frightened expression came across Raymond's face. He looked at Dr Bruner for help. 'I... don't... know,' he muttered.

'Yes, you do know this car!' 「はい、あなたはこの車を知っています!」 Charlie said angrily. 'Why do you know?'

'That's enough, Mr Babbitt,' Dr Bruner said. 'You're upsetting him. You're -'

'Charlie, please,' Susanna said.

Now Raymond looked from Susanna to Dr Bruner. He began writing in his notebook and muttering to himself.

'Babbitt Charlie. Charlie... Babbitt. Charlie Babbitt. 1961 Beechcrest Avenue.'

Charlie was astonished. 'How do you know that address?' he asked.

Dr Bruner spoke quietly. 'Because he's your brother,' he said.

'But I don't have a brother,' the astonished Charlie said. 「しかし、私には兄弟がいません」と驚いたチャーリーは言いました。 'I never had a brother.'

CHAPTER FOUR

Charlie and Dr Bruner walked through the flower garden and talked together. Susanna sat with Raymond, who was still writing in his notebook.

'What can I tell you?' 「私はあなたに何を言うことができますか?」 the doctor asked.

'Where to begin?' 「どこから始めますか?」

'What does he write in that notebook?'

'He writes down things that he thinks are dangerous. Things like bad weather reports.' 悪天候の報告のようなもの。」

'Why does he do that?'

'I think he writes dangerous things down to try and hide them. Raymond sees danger everywhere. Any change frightens him. That is why he always does things in the same way every day.'

'What do you mean?'

'Raymond always eats the same way, sleeps the same way, talks the same way. Everything. But he's a person, your brother. In some ways, a very intelligent person.'

Dr Bruner looked at Charlie for a second or two, then he continued. 'Raymond cannot have relationships with other people, and he cannot see the relationship between things. 「レイモンドは他の人との関係を持つことができず、物事間の関係を見ることができません。 He talks to you, but he also talks to the car and the television. Everything is the same to him. すべてが彼にとって同じです。 Doctors call this sort of person autistic.' 医者はこの種の人を自閉症と呼びます。

Charlie thought about this. It was difficult to understand.

'And the most important thing is that Raymond can't feel. 「そして最も重要なことは、レイモンドが感じることができないということです。 He cannot be happy or sad in the way that we are happy or sad.' 彼は私たちが幸せまたは悲しい方法で幸せまたは悲しいことはできません。

Dr Bruner stopped speaking and looked at Charlie. Charlie was biting his lip and looking over at his brother.

'What Raymond did with you today... that was very good,' Dr Bruner said softly. 'Very good. For a stranger.' 見知らぬ人のために。」

Charlie shook his head and laughed. 'The world is strange,' he said. 'Three million dollars! What's he going to spend it on?' 彼はそれを何に使うつもりですか?」

It was late afternoon. Charlie was walking with Raymond. Susanna waited in the car. She thought that Charlie was saying goodbye to his new brother.

Charlie walked quickly towards the Buick. Raymond walked next to him.

'This is Daddy's car,' Raymond said. 'It was white. But now this is a blue car.'

Charlie got into the Buick. 'Get in, Raymond,' he said.

Raymond got into the car.

'Charlie, wait a minute!' Susanna said. 'Where are we taking him?'

'For a holiday,' Charlie said. He started the car and they drove away. Raymond looked back over his shoulder at the house that they were leaving. There was no expression on his face, but it was very clear that he was anxious.

'Don't worry, Raymond,' Susanna told him, 'you're coming back.'

Charlie said nothing.

CHAPTER FIVE

They drove back to Cincinnati. Raymond sat in the back of the Buick and watched the road go by. He said nothing to Charlie or Susanna, but muttered strange things to himself.

They went to a hotel, and took two rooms. Charlie showed Raymond his room.

'This is your room, Ray,' he said.

That was a big mistake.

Raymond looked around the room. 'This is not my room,' he said. There was a frightened expression on his face. 'This is... is not my room.'

'Just for tonight,' Charlie said.

'Until we take you home,' Susanna said.

But Raymond was very upset now. He was shaking his head from side to side and muttering to himself. 'Of course, I'm going to be here a long time. A very long time... Of course, they moved my bed.'

'Sorry, Raymond,' Charlie said. 'You like the bed under the window.' 「あなたは窓の下のベッドが好きです。」 He started pushing the bed into its new place. 彼はベッドを新しい場所に押し込み始めました。

But Raymond was still unhappy. しかし、レイモンドはまだ不幸でした。 He started muttering about books. The only book in the room was a telephone book for Cincinnati.

'Charlie, let's take him home,' Susanna said. She liked Raymond, and she did not like to see him upset.

'He's OK,' Charlie said. 'Do you like pizza, Ray?'

'Do you like pizza, Charlie Babbitt?' Raymond knew the word 'pizza' because 'pizza' was a Wallbrook word. This calmed him a little.

'I'll ask the hotel to send a pizza up to your room,' Charlie said. 「ホテルにピザをあなたの部屋に送るように頼みます」とチャーリーは言いました。 'We like pizza, don't we, Ray? We're brothers.'

'Charlie, he still doesn't look happy,' Susanna said. 'I don't understand why you brought him here. I think he wants to go back to Wallbrook.'

'Ray's fine,' Charlie said, 'all he needs is some TV and some pizza. What's on TV, Ray?' レイ、テレビには何がありますか?」

Raymond looked at his watch. レイモンドは彼の時計を見ました。 'The Lucky Money Wheel,' he told the watch.

'Great. Sit down, and you can watch it.'

Charlie turned on the television. The Lucky Money Wheel came on. ラッキーマネーホイールが登場しました。

'You've got your TV,' Charlie said. 「あなたはあなたのテレビを持っています」とチャーリーは言いました。 'You've got a pizza coming. 「あなたはピザが来ています。 Aren't things good, Ray?' 物事は良くない、レイ?」

Charlie looked at Raymond and Raymond looked at Charlie, but there was no expression on his face.

'Do you ever smile, Ray?' 「あなたは今までに微笑んだことがありますか、レイ?」 Charlie asked.

'Do you ever smile?' Raymond repeated. There was still no expression on his face.

Raymond sat on his bed and watched television. Charlie came in with a pizza.

Ray looked at the pizza and shook his head. 'What's the problem, Ray?' Charlie asked.

Raymond wanted to eat the pizza the way that he ate it at Wallbrook. レイモンドは、ウォールブルックで食べたのと同じ方法でピザを食べたかったのです。 Charlie cut the pizza into tiny squares for him, and put each square on a toothpick.

Charlie and Susanna went off to their room. Raymond watched a film. A man in the film told his son to turn the television off. Raymond got up and turned his television off.

Raymond continued to look at the television, but now there was nothing to watch. He heard the sound of another television in Charlie and Susanna's room. Raymond got up and went into their room.

Charlie and Susanna were in bed. They did not see Raymond come into the room. Raymond sat on the end of the bed and watched the television.

Susanna saw him first. 'Charlie,' she said, in a quiet voice. 'Raymond is sitting at the end of the bed.'

Charlie sat up and saw that Raymond was watching TV and eating pizza. 'Raymond, what are you doing in here?' he shouted. 'Get out!'

Raymond got up and went back to his room. Susanna looked at Charlie with an angry expression on her face. 'Go and talk to him!' she said.

'What for?' Charlie asked.

'Because he's frightened,' Susanna said. 'He's never been away from Wallbrook before. You've upset him!' あなたは彼を動揺させました!」

Charlie got angry. 'Raymond is not going back to Wallbrook,' he said. 'He has to learn how to live in the real world.'

Susanna was astonished. 'What do you mean he's not going back to Wallbrook?'

Charlie looked away from her and bit his lip. 'I took Raymond,' he said quietly, 'and I'm keeping him until I get my money.'

Susanna's eyes widened. 'What money?' she asked.

'Dad left Ray some money. A lot of money.'

Money! Now Susanna was beginning to understand. 'How much money... did... your... father... leave Raymond?' she asked angrily.

Charlie looked away again. 'He left him his house and all his money,' he said. 'Three million dollars.'

Susanna muttered some angry words in Italian and jumped out of bed. スザンナはイタリア語でいくつかの怒った言葉をつぶやき、ベッドから飛び降りました。 Then, she picked up her suitcase from the floor and threw it open. それから、彼女は床からスーツケースを拾い上げて、それを開いた。

'What are you doing?' Charlie asked.

'I'm leaving you, Charlie.' She was coldly angry.

Now Charlie was astonished. 'Why?' he asked.

Susanna pushed her things into the suitcase and pulled on her coat. 'Because you've kidnapped your brother for money,' she shouted.

'I have not kidnapped him! I just want my money. What's wrong with that?'

'Everything!' Susanna shouted. She looked at Charlie for a second and shook her head. Then she picked up her suitcase and moved towards the door. When she got to the door, she turned and looked at Charlie again. 'I did love you, Charlie,' she said sadly. 'But you are not the man that I thought you were.'