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E-Books (english-e-reader), Christmas in Prague CHAPTER 1-4(2)

Christmas in Prague CHAPTER 1-4(2)

'It's me, Giorgio Rinaldi, the conductor of the orchestra.'

'Mr Rinaldi?' Carol opened her eyes again. Her head didn't hurt so much this time.

'What are you doing in my bedroom?' she asked angrily. 'What's happening?'

'This isn't your bedroom,' said Mr Rinaldi. 'It's a hospital in Prague. You had an accident yesterday. Can you remember anything about it?'

Suddenly Carol remembered everything. The old town... the Christmas trees in the shop windows... Christmas presents... Jan... Jan!

She sat up.

'Jan! Where's Jan?' she asked Mr Rinaldi.

'Please, Mrs Vlach,' said a woman quietly. 'Don't get excited. Lie down again.'

Carol turned her head. It hurt again. Near the door of the room, she saw a woman in a white coat - a doctor.

'But I must see Jan,' Carol said. 'Where is he? I must find him... I can't... Oh, dear.' She put her hand to her head.

'Who's Jan?' the doctor asked Mr Rinaldi quietly.

'Her husband,' he answered. He took Carol's hand. 'Listen, your husband is coming. We told him about the accident. He's on a plane from London now.'

'On a plane? Why? He's here in Prague. I saw him in the street, near the old town. I called out to him, and he saw me, but he didn't stop... He just walked away from me. Please find him... please... I must talk to him... I must...'

The doctor moved nearer to the bed.

'Jan is coming soon, Mrs Vlach,' she said. 'Please don't get excited. It's not good for you. Now, lie down again and close your eyes. You must sleep, and I know you're feeling very tired.'

Carol lay down and closed her eyes. The doctor was right. She was tired. But why didn't they listen? Why didn't they understand? Jan was in Prague, and she must find him... talk to him...

The doctor looked at Mr Rinaldi and spoke very quietly. 'Let's leave her now, please. She needs to sleep. You can come back later.'

Mr Rinaldi and the doctor left the room. They closed the door quietly, and then looked at Carol through the window in the door.

'She's going to be all right,' said the doctor. 'She just needs to sleep for a time. There's nothing wrong with her.'

'Yes, there is!' said Mr Rinaldi. 'She thinks her husband is in Prague. But I spoke to him on the telephone three hours ago and he was in Oxford. I'm afraid she's ill - very ill.'

'Listen,' said the doctor. 'She had a bad hit on the head in the accident, but she didn't break anything and her head is all right. We looked at it very carefully. She's going to be OK after a good sleep.'

'But - all this talk about Jan her husband,' said Mr Rinaldi. 'What about that?'

'Yes, she's confused about that, it's true. But she remembers her name, she knows you, and she understands that she's in hospital. All this is very good. Now, what about you, Mr Rinaldi? It's a difficult time for you too, because of your concerts. I understand that. But please go away now. Eat something. Have a sleep. Then come back later this afternoon. You can't do anything now.'

'All right,' said Mr Rinaldi. But he was not happy. 'Poor Carol,' he thought. 'And my poor orchestra. How can I find another harpist before tonight's concert?'


Christmas in Prague CHAPTER 1-4(2)

'It's me, Giorgio Rinaldi, the conductor of the orchestra.'

'Mr Rinaldi?' Carol opened her eyes again. Her head didn't hurt so much this time.

'What are you doing in my bedroom?' she asked angrily. 'What's happening?'

'This isn't your bedroom,' said Mr Rinaldi. 'It's a hospital in Prague. You had an accident yesterday. Can you remember anything about it?'

Suddenly Carol remembered everything. The old town... the Christmas trees in the shop windows... Christmas presents... Jan... Jan!

She sat up.

'Jan! Where's Jan?' she asked Mr Rinaldi.

'Please, Mrs Vlach,' said a woman quietly. 'Don't get excited. Lie down again.'

Carol turned her head. It hurt again. Near the door of the room, she saw a woman in a white coat - a doctor.

'But I must see Jan,' Carol said. 'Where is he? I must find him... I can't... Oh, dear.' She put her hand to her head.

'Who's Jan?' the doctor asked Mr Rinaldi quietly.

'Her husband,' he answered. He took Carol's hand. 'Listen, your husband is coming. We told him about the accident. He's on a plane from London now.'

'On a plane? Why? He's here in Prague. I saw him in the street, near the old town. I called out to him, and he saw me, but he didn't stop... He just walked away from me. Please find him... please... I must talk to him... I must...'

The doctor moved nearer to the bed.

'Jan is coming soon, Mrs Vlach,' she said. 'Please don't get excited. It's not good for you. Now, lie down again and close your eyes. You must sleep, and I know you're feeling very tired.'

Carol lay down and closed her eyes. The doctor was right. She was tired. But why didn't they listen? Why didn't they understand? Jan was in Prague, and she must find him... talk to him...

The doctor looked at Mr Rinaldi and spoke very quietly. 'Let's leave her now, please. She needs to sleep. You can come back later.'

Mr Rinaldi and the doctor left the room. They closed the door quietly, and then looked at Carol through the window in the door.

'She's going to be all right,' said the doctor. 'She just needs to sleep for a time. There's nothing wrong with her.'

'Yes, there is!' said Mr Rinaldi. 'She thinks her husband is in Prague. But I spoke to him on the telephone three hours ago and he was in Oxford. I'm afraid she's ill - very ill.'

'Listen,' said the doctor. 'She had a bad hit on the head in the accident, but she didn't break anything and her head is all right. We looked at it very carefully. She's going to be OK after a good sleep.'

'But - all this talk about Jan her husband,' said Mr Rinaldi. 'What about that?'

'Yes, she's confused about that, it's true. But she remembers her name, she knows you, and she understands that she's in hospital. All this is very good. Now, what about you, Mr Rinaldi? It's a difficult time for you too, because of your concerts. I understand that. But please go away now. Eat something. Have a sleep. Then come back later this afternoon. You can't do anything now.'

'All right,' said Mr Rinaldi. But he was not happy. 'Poor Carol,' he thought. 'And my poor orchestra. How can I find another harpist before tonight's concert?'