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E-Books (english-e-reader), Breaking Loose (2)

Breaking Loose (2)

But up to now she had known almost nothing about India. At first, her search for her own past seemed to put a distance between her and Akoto, the African. But this was what he had talked about - digging deep, finding what was real. So in a strange way her search also brought her closer to him.

The world seemed a smaller place when she went back to university. Smaller but exciting; full of people doing their best, fighting, loving, staying alive. And she was one of those people. People who were locked into their own histories and customs were like prisoners, she thought. But sometimes the old patterns were broken, and things changed - lives changed, the world changed. She was part of that change, she decided.

A month later Yasmin's father was lifting boxes in his shop when he felt a pain in his heart. The doctor was called, but arrived late, and by then Yasmin's father was dead.

Daniel Akoto came to the funeral. He sat on the ground among the men, sweating and uncomfortable, trying to sit with his legs crossed. A black face in a sea of patient brown Asian faces. Someone saw how uncomfortable he was and put out a chair for him by the wall. From there Akoto could see clearly across the room.

Mrs Rajan sat beside the dead man, crying. When she looked up, she saw Akoto through her tears, and lost control.

'You!' she screamed. 'What are you doing here? What kind of man are you, who comes to take away my daughter, even in my sadness? Who asked you to come? Go away!'

People turned to stare. Akoto gave an apologetic smile.

'Go!' said the woman wildly, pointing a finger at the door.

No one else said a word. Akoto stood up, bent his head respectfully towards the dead man and left the room.

A week later Yasmin knocked at his door late in the evening and found him in.

'Come in,' he said, putting away his pipe.

'I've come to apologize for what happened at the funeral.'

'It's all right. People aren't at their best at a funeral... but perhaps they're more honest.' He watched her face carefully.

'You must think we're awful. You're a professor - you know so much - you're a great man...'

'No, I don't think you're awful. And don't call me a great man!'

She began to laugh, a little wildly. They both laughed.

'And you, I respect you.' He spoke calmly. 'You are brave. You left that crowd of girls that day at the dance, and since then you've done it again and again. It's brave, what you've done. Trying to break away from family, friends, the old customs, the old ways... trying to find your own path in life... Even coming here like this. I realize that and I like you.'

'Well, I like you too!' she said, too quickly. There was a silence between them. 'You know, it's not going to be easy... with my father dead, this will be the most terrible news for my mother... it will kill her, it will...' Tears were running down her face.

'Now, now.' He went up to her, put her wet face on his shirt. 'We'll have to do the best we can, won't we?'

- THE END -


Breaking Loose (2) ブレイキングルーズ(2)

But up to now she had known almost nothing about India. しかし今まで、彼女はインドについてほとんど何も知りませんでした。 At first, her search for her own past seemed to put a distance between her and Akoto, the African. 当初、彼女自身の過去を探求することは、彼女とアフリカ人のアコトとの間に距離を置いているように見えました。 But this was what he had talked about - digging deep, finding what was real. しかし、これは彼が話していたことでした-深く掘り下げて、本当のことを見つけました。 So in a strange way her search also brought her closer to him. それで奇妙なことに、彼女の捜索は彼女を彼に近づけました。

The world seemed a smaller place when she went back to university. 彼女が大学に戻ったとき、世界はより小さな場所のように見えました。 Smaller but exciting; full of people doing their best, fighting, loving, staying alive. 小さいけれどエキサイティング。最善を尽くし、戦い、愛し、生き続ける人々でいっぱいです。 And she was one of those people. そして彼女はそれらの人々の一人でした。 People who were locked into their own histories and customs were like prisoners, she thought. 自分の歴史や習慣に縛られた人々は囚人のようだったと彼女は思った。 But sometimes the old patterns were broken, and things changed - lives changed, the world changed. しかし、時には古いパターンが壊れ、物事が変化しました-人生が変化し、世界が変化しました。 She was part of that change, she decided. 彼女はその変化の一部だった、と彼女は決めた。

A month later Yasmin's father was lifting boxes in his shop when he felt a pain in his heart. 一ヶ月後、ヤスミンの父親は、彼が心の痛みを感じたとき、彼の店で箱を持ち上げていました。 The doctor was called, but arrived late, and by then Yasmin's father was dead.

Daniel Akoto came to the funeral. He sat on the ground among the men, sweating and uncomfortable, trying to sit with his legs crossed. 彼は男性の間で地面に座り、汗をかき、不快になり、足を組んで座ろうとした。 A black face in a sea of patient brown Asian faces. 忍耐強い茶色のアジア人の顔の海の黒い顔。 Someone saw how uncomfortable he was and put out a chair for him by the wall. 誰かが彼がどれほど不快であるかを見て、壁のそばに彼のために椅子を置いた。 From there Akoto could see clearly across the room. そこからアコトは部屋の向こう側をはっきりと見ることができた。

Mrs Rajan sat beside the dead man, crying. ラジャン夫人は死んだ男のそばに座って泣きました。 When she looked up, she saw Akoto through her tears, and lost control. 見上げると、涙を流しながらアコトを見て、コントロールを失った。

'You!' she screamed. 'What are you doing here? What kind of man are you, who comes to take away my daughter, even in my sadness? 悲しみの中でも娘を連れ去りに来るあなたはどんな男ですか? Who asked you to come? 誰があなたに来るように頼んだのですか? Go away!'

People turned to stare. 人々は凝視するようになりました。 Akoto gave an apologetic smile. アコトはお詫びの笑みを浮かべた。

'Go!' said the woman wildly, pointing a finger at the door. と女性は乱暴にドアに指を向けて言った。

No one else said a word. 誰も一言も言わなかった。 Akoto stood up, bent his head respectfully towards the dead man and left the room. アコトは立ち上がって、死んだ男に向かって敬意を表して頭を曲げ、部屋を出た。

A week later Yasmin knocked at his door late in the evening and found him in. 一週間後、ヤスミンは夜遅くにドアをノックし、彼を見つけました。

'Come in,' he said, putting away his pipe. 「入って来い」と彼はパイプを片付けながら言った。

'I've come to apologize for what happened at the funeral.' 「葬式で起こったことをお詫びするようになりました。」

'It's all right. '大丈夫。 People aren't at their best at a funeral... but perhaps they're more honest.' 人々は葬式で最高の状態ではありません...しかし、おそらく彼らはもっと正直です。」 He watched her face carefully.

'You must think we're awful. 「あなたは私たちがひどいことを考えなければなりません。 You're a professor - you know so much - you're a great man...' あなたは教授です-あなたはとてもよく知っています-あなたは素晴らしい人です...」

'No, I don't think you're awful. 「いいえ、あなたがひどいとは思わない。 And don't call me a great man!' そして、私を偉大な男と呼ばないでください!」

She began to laugh, a little wildly. 彼女は少し乱暴に笑い始めた。 They both laughed.

'And you, I respect you.' 「そしてあなた、私はあなたを尊敬しています。」 He spoke calmly. 彼は落ち着いて話した。 'You are brave. 'あなたは勇敢です。 You left that crowd of girls that day at the dance, and since then you've done it again and again. あなたはその日のダンスでその女の子の群衆を去りました、そしてそれ以来あなたはそれを何度も繰り返しました。 It's brave, what you've done. それは勇敢です、あなたがしたことです。 Trying to break away from family, friends, the old customs, the old ways... trying to find your own path in life... Even coming here like this. 家族、友人、古い習慣、古い方法から脱却しようとしています...人生の中であなた自身の道を見つけようとしています...このようにここに来ることさえ。 I realize that and I like you.' 私はそれを理解し、あなたが好きです。」

'Well, I like you too!' 「まあ、私もあなたが好きです!」 she said, too quickly. There was a silence between them. それらの間に沈黙がありました。 'You know, it's not going to be easy... with my father dead, this will be the most terrible news for my mother... it will kill her, it will...' Tears were running down her face. 「ご存知のとおり、それは簡単なことではありません...父が亡くなったので、これは私の母にとって最も恐ろしいニュースになるでしょう...それは彼女を殺します、それは...」涙が彼女の顔に流れていました。

'Now, now.' '今今。' He went up to her, put her wet face on his shirt. 彼は彼女に近づき、濡れた顔をシャツに着せた。 'We'll have to do the best we can, won't we?' 「できる限りのことをしなければなりませんね」

- THE END -