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E-Books (english-e-reader), Andrina (1)

Andrina (1)

Andrina

Ten miles off the north coast of Scotland are the Orkney Islands, wild and beautiful, beaten by the clean cold winds of the North Sea. Life there in the last century was simple, but hard.

Captain Torvald has returned home to Orkney after a lifetime as a seaman on the world's oceans. He lives alone with his memories of the past, a past he has tried hard to forget...

Andrina comes to see me every afternoon in winter, just before it gets dark. She lights my lamp, gets the fire burning brightly, checks that there is enough water in my bucket that stands in the hole in the wall. If I have a cold (which isn't often, I'm a tough old seaman), she worries a little, puts an extra peat or two on the fire, fills a stone hot- water bottle, puts an old thick coat around my shoulders.

That good Andrina - as soon as she has gone, I throw the coat off my shoulders and mix myself a toddy - whisky and hot water and sugar. The hot-water bottle in the bed will be cold long before I climb into it, after I've read my few chapters of a Joseph Conrad novel.

Towards the end of February last year I did get a very bad cold, the worst for years. I woke up, shaking, one morning, and was almost too weak to get to the cupboard to find my breakfast. But I wasn't hungry. There was a stone inside my chest, that made it hard to breathe.

I made myself eat a little, and drank hot ugly tea. There was nothing to do after that except get back to bed with my book. But I found I couldn't read - my eyes were burning and my head was beating like a drum.

'Well,' I thought, 'Andrina'll be here in five or six hours' time. She won't be able to do much for me, but it will cheer me to see the girl.'

Andrina did not come that afternoon. I expected her with the first shadows of the evening: the slow opening of the door, the soft spoken 'good evening', the gentle shaking of her head as she saw the things that needed doing. But I had that strange feeling that often comes with a fever, when you feel that your head does not belong to your body.

When the window was blackness at last with the first stars shining, I accepted at last that for some reason or another Andrina couldn't come. I fell asleep again.

I woke up. A grey light at the window. My mouth was dry, there was a fire in my face, my head was beating worse than ever. I got up, my feet in cold pain on the stone floor, drank a cup of water, and climbed back into bed. I was shaking with cold, my teeth banging together for several minutes, something I had only read about before.

I slept again, and woke up just as the winter sun was disappearing into the blueness of sea and sky. It was, again, Andrina's time. Today there were things that she could do for me: get aspirin from the shop, put three or four very hot bottles around me, mix the strongest toddy in the world. A few words from her would be like a bell to a sailor lost in fog. She did not come.

She did not come again on the third afternoon.

I woke, shakily, like a ghost. It was black night. Wind sang in the chimney. There was, from time to time, the beating of rain against the window. It was the longest night of my life. I lived, over and over again, through the times in my life of which I am most ashamed; the worst time was repeated endlessly, like the same piece of music playing again and again and again. It was a shameful time, but at last sleep shut it out. Love was dead, killed long ago, but the ghosts of that time were now awake.

When I woke up, I heard for the first time in four days the sound of a voice. It was Stanley the postman speaking to Ben, the dog at Bighouse.

'There now, isn't that a lot of noise so early in the morning? It's just a letter for Minnie, a letter from a shop. Be a good boy, go and tell Minnie I have a love letter for her... Is that you, Minnie? I thought old Ben was going to bite my leg off then. Yes, Minnie, a fine morning, it is that...'

I have never liked that postman - he is only interested in people that he thinks are important in the island - but that morning he came past my window like a messenger of light. He opened the door without knocking (I am not an important person). He said, 'Letter from far away, Captain.' He put the letter on the chair nearest the door.

I was opening my mouth to say, 'I'm not very well. I wonder...' But if any words came out, they were only ghostly whispers.

Stanley looked at the dead fire and the closed window. He said, 'Phew! It's airless in here, Captain. You want to get some fresh air...' Then he went, closing the door behind him. (No message would go to Andrina, then, or to the doctor in the village.)

I thought, until I slept again, about the last letter people write before dying...

In a day or two, of course, I was all right again; a tough old sailor like me isn't killed off that easily.

But there was a sadness, a loneliness around me. I had been ill, alone, helpless. Why had my friend left me in my bad time?

Then I became sensible again. 'Torvald, you old fool,' I said to myself. 'Why should a pretty twenty-year-old spend her time with you? Look at it this way, man - you've had a winter of her kindness and care. She brought a lamp into your dark time; ever since the Harvest Home party when (like a fool) you had too much whisky. And she helped you home and put you into bed... Well, for some reason or another Andrina hasn't been able to come these last few days. I'll find out, today, the reason.'

It was time for me to get to the village. There was not a piece of bread or a gram of butter in the cupboard. The shop was also the Post Office - I had to collect two weeks' pension. I promised myself a beer or two in the pub, to wash the last of that sickness out of me.

I realized, as I slowly walked those two miles, that I knew nothing about Andrina at all. I had never asked, and she had said nothing. What was her father? Had she sisters and brothers? I had never even learned in our talks where she lived on the island. It was enough that she came every evening, soon after sunset, did her quiet work in the house, and stayed a while, and left a peace behind - a feeling that a clean summer wind had blown through the heart of the house, bringing light and sweetness.

But the girl had never stopped, all last winter, asking me questions about myself - all the good and bad and exciting things that had happened to me. Of course I told her this and that. Old men love to make their past important, to make a simple life sound full of interest and great success. I gave her stories in which I was a wild, brave seaman, who was known and feared across all the seas of the world, from Hong Kong to Durban to San Francisco. Oh, what a famous sea captain I was!

And the girl loved these stories, true or not true, turning the lamp down a little, to make everything more mysterious, stirring the fire into new flowers of flame...

One story I did not tell her. It is the time in my life that hurts me every time I think of it. I don't think of it often, because that time is locked up and the key is dropped deep in the Atlantic Ocean, but it is a ghost, as I said earlier, that woke during my recent illness.

On her last evening at my fireside I did, I know, tell a little of that story, just a few half-ashamed pieces of it.

Suddenly, before I had finished - did she already know the ending? - she had put a white look and a cold kiss on my cheek, and gone out at the door; as I learned later, for the last time.

Hurt or no, I will tell the story here and now. You who look and listen are not Andrina - to you it will seem a story of rough country people, a story of the young and foolish, the young and heartless.

In the island, fifty years ago, a young man and a young woman came together. They had known each other all their lives up to then, of course - they had sat in the school room together - but on one day in early summer this boy from one croft and this girl from another distant croft looked at each other with new eyes.

After the midsummer dance at the big house, they walked together across the hill under the wide summer night sky - it is never dark here in summertime - and came to the rocks and the sand and sea just as the sun was rising. For an hour or more they stayed there, held in the magic of that time, while the sea and the sunlight danced around them.

It was a story full of the light of a single short summer. The boy and the girl lived, it seemed, on each other's heartbeats. Their parents' crofts were miles distant, but they managed to meet most days; at the crossroads, at the village shop, on the side of the hill. But really those places were too open, there were too many windows - so their feet went secretly night after night to the beach with its bird-cries, its cave, its changing waters. There they could be safely alone, no one to see the gentle touches of hand and mouth, no one to hear the words that were nonsense but that became in his mouth a sweet mysterious music... 'Sigrid.'

The boy - his future, once the magic of this summer was over, was to go to the university in Aberdeen and there study to be a man of importance and riches, far from the simple life of a croft.

No door like that would open for Sigrid. Her future was the small family croft, the digging of peat, the making of butter and cheese. But for a short time only. Her place would be beside the young man whose heartbeats she lived on, when he had finished his studies and become a teacher. They walked day after day beside the shining waters.

But one evening, at the cave, towards the end of that summer, when the fields were turning golden, she had something to tell him - a frightened, dangerous, secret thing. And at once the summertime magic was broken. He shook his head. He looked away. He looked at her again as a stranger, a cruel hateful look. She put out her hand to him, shaking a little. He pushed her away. He turned. He ran up the beach and along the path to the road above; and the golden fields closed round him and hid him from her.

And the girl was left alone at the mouth of the cave, with an even greater loneliness in the mystery ahead of her.

The young man did not go to any university. That same day he was in Hamnavoe, asking for an immediate ticket on a ship to Canada, Australia, South Africa - anywhere.


Andrina (1)

Andrina

Ten miles off the north coast of Scotland are the Orkney Islands, wild and beautiful, beaten by the clean cold winds of the North Sea. Life there in the last century was simple, but hard. 前世紀のそこでの生活は単純でしたが、大変でした。

Captain Torvald has returned home to Orkney after a lifetime as a seaman on the world's oceans. トーヴァルド大尉は、世界の海で船員として一生を過ごした後、オークニーに帰国しました。 He lives alone with his memories of the past, a past he has tried hard to forget... 彼は過去の思い出、忘れようと懸命に努力した過去と一人暮らしをしています...

Andrina comes to see me every afternoon in winter, just before it gets dark. アンドリーナは、冬の午後、暗くなる直前に私に会いに来ます。 She lights my lamp, gets the fire burning brightly, checks that there is enough water in my bucket that stands in the hole in the wall. If I have a cold (which isn't often, I'm a tough old seaman), she worries a little, puts an extra peat or two on the fire, fills a stone hot- water bottle, puts an old thick coat around my shoulders.

That good Andrina - as soon as she has gone, I throw the coat off my shoulders and mix myself a toddy - whisky and hot water and sugar. その良いアンドリーナ-彼女が去ったらすぐに、私はコートを肩から外し、ウイスキーとお湯と砂糖を混ぜ合わせます。 The hot-water bottle in the bed will be cold long before I climb into it, after I've read my few chapters of a Joseph Conrad novel. ベッドの湯たんぽは、ジョセフ・コンラッドの小説のいくつかの章を読んだ後、私がそれに登るずっと前に冷たくなります。

Towards the end of February last year I did get a very bad cold, the worst for years. 去年の2月末にかけて、私は非常にひどい風邪をひきました。これは何年もの間最悪でした。 I woke up, shaking, one morning, and was almost too weak to get to the cupboard to find my breakfast. ある朝、私は目が覚め、震え、ほとんど弱すぎて食器棚にたどり着き、朝食を見つけることができませんでした。 But I wasn't hungry. There was a stone inside my chest, that made it hard to breathe.

I made myself eat a little, and drank hot ugly tea. 少し食べさせて、醜いお茶を飲みました。 There was nothing to do after that except get back to bed with my book. その後、私の本を持ってベッドに戻る以外に何もすることはありませんでした。 But I found I couldn't read - my eyes were burning and my head was beating like a drum. しかし、私は読むことができないことに気づきました-私の目は燃えていて、私の頭は太鼓のように鼓動していました。

'Well,' I thought, 'Andrina'll be here in five or six hours' time. 「まあ、」私は思った、「アンドリーナは5時間か6時間でここに来るでしょう」。 She won't be able to do much for me, but it will cheer me to see the girl.' 彼女は私のために多くのことをすることはできませんが、女の子に会うことは私を元気づけます。 Вона не зможе багато чого для мене зробити, але мені буде радісно побачити цю дівчину».

Andrina did not come that afternoon. アンドリーナはその日の午後には来ませんでした。 I expected her with the first shadows of the evening: the slow opening of the door, the soft spoken 'good evening', the gentle shaking of her head as she saw the things that needed doing. But I had that strange feeling that often comes with a fever, when you feel that your head does not belong to your body. でも、頭が体に属していないように感じると、熱が出ることが多いという不思議な感覚がありました。

When the window was blackness at last with the first stars shining, I accepted at last that for some reason or another Andrina couldn't come. I fell asleep again.

I woke up. A grey light at the window. 窓の灰色のライト。 My mouth was dry, there was a fire in my face, my head was beating worse than ever. 口が乾いていて、顔に火がついていて、頭がこれまで以上にひどく鼓動していました。 I got up, my feet in cold pain on the stone floor, drank a cup of water, and climbed back into bed. 私は起き上がり、石の床で足が冷たく痛み、一杯の水を飲み、そしてベッドに戻った。 I was shaking with cold, my teeth banging together for several minutes, something I had only read about before. 私は寒さで震え、歯が数分間ぶつかり合っていました。これは私が以前に読んだことのないことです。

I slept again, and woke up just as the winter sun was disappearing into the blueness of sea and sky. 私は再び眠り、冬の太陽が海と空の青に消えていったちょうどその時に目が覚めました。 It was, again, Andrina's time. Today there were things that she could do for me: get aspirin from the shop, put three or four very hot bottles around me, mix the strongest toddy in the world. A few words from her would be like a bell to a sailor lost in fog. 彼女からのいくつかの言葉は、霧の中で失われた船乗りへの鐘のようなものです。 She did not come.

She did not come again on the third afternoon.

I woke, shakily, like a ghost. It was black night. Wind sang in the chimney. There was, from time to time, the beating of rain against the window. It was the longest night of my life. I lived, over and over again, through the times in my life of which I am most ashamed; the worst time was repeated endlessly, like the same piece of music playing again and again and again. It was a shameful time, but at last sleep shut it out. 恥ずかしい時期でしたが、ついに眠りにつくことができませんでした。 Love was dead, killed long ago, but the ghosts of that time were now awake. 愛は死んで、ずっと前に殺されました、しかしその時の幽霊は今目覚めていました。

When I woke up, I heard for the first time in four days the sound of a voice. 目が覚めたとき、4日ぶりに声が聞こえました。 It was Stanley the postman speaking to Ben, the dog at Bighouse. ビッグハウスの犬であるベンに話しかけるのは郵便配達員のスタンリーでした。

'There now, isn't that a lot of noise so early in the morning? 「さて、朝早くからそんなに騒がしいのではないですか? It's just a letter for Minnie, a letter from a shop. Be a good boy, go and tell Minnie I have a love letter for her... Is that you, Minnie? いい子になって、ミニーにラブレターがあると言ってください…それはあなたですか、ミニー? I thought old Ben was going to bite my leg off then. その時、古いベンが私の足を噛むつもりだったと思いました。 Yes, Minnie, a fine morning, it is that...' はい、ミニー、おはようございます、それは...」

I have never liked that postman - he is only interested in people that he thinks are important in the island - but that morning he came past my window like a messenger of light. He opened the door without knocking (I am not an important person). 彼はノックせずにドアを開けました(私は重要な人物ではありません)。 He said, 'Letter from far away, Captain.' 彼は言った、「遠くからの手紙、船長」。 He put the letter on the chair nearest the door. 彼はその手紙をドアに一番近い椅子に置いた。

I was opening my mouth to say, 'I'm not very well. 私は口を開いて言った、「私はあまり体調が良くありません。 I wonder...' But if any words came out, they were only ghostly whispers.

Stanley looked at the dead fire and the closed window. スタンリーは死んだ火と閉じた窓を見ました。 He said, 'Phew! It's airless in here, Captain. キャプテン、ここは空気がない。 You want to get some fresh air...' Then he went, closing the door behind him. あなたは新鮮な空気を手に入れたいのです...」それから彼は行き、彼の後ろのドアを閉めました。 (No message would go to Andrina, then, or to the doctor in the village.) (その後、アンドリーナや村の医者にメッセージは届きません。)

I thought, until I slept again, about the last letter people write before dying... 私は再び眠るまで、人々が死ぬ前に書いた最後の手紙について考えました...

In a day or two, of course, I was all right again; a tough old sailor like me isn't killed off that easily. もちろん、1日か2日で、私は再び大丈夫でした。私のようなタフな年老いた船乗りは、そんなに簡単に殺されることはありません。

But there was a sadness, a loneliness around me. しかし、私の周りには悲しみ、孤独がありました。 I had been ill, alone, helpless. 私は一人で病気で無力でした。 Why had my friend left me in my bad time? なぜ私の友人は私の悪い時期に私を置き去りにしたのですか?

Then I became sensible again. それから私は再び賢明になりました。 'Torvald, you old fool,' I said to myself. 「Torvald、あなたは年老いたばかだ」と私は自分に言い聞かせた。 'Why should a pretty twenty-year-old spend her time with you? 「なぜかなり20歳の人があなたと一緒に時間を過ごす必要があるのですか? Look at it this way, man - you've had a winter of her kindness and care. このようにそれを見てください、男-あなたは彼女の優しさと世話の冬を過ごしました。 She brought a lamp into your dark time; ever since the Harvest Home party when (like a fool) you had too much whisky. 彼女はあなたの暗い時間にランプを持ってきました。ハーベストホームパーティー以来、(ばかみたいに)ウイスキーが多すぎたときから。 And she helped you home and put you into bed... Well, for some reason or another Andrina hasn't been able to come these last few days. そして、彼女はあなたが家に帰ってあなたをベッドに入れるのを手伝いました...まあ、どういうわけか、アンドリーナはここ数日来られませんでした。 I'll find out, today, the reason.'

It was time for me to get to the village. 村に着く時が来ました。 There was not a piece of bread or a gram of butter in the cupboard. 食器棚にはパンもバターもありませんでした。 The shop was also the Post Office - I had to collect two weeks' pension. その店は郵便局でもありました-私は2週間の年金を徴収しなければなりませんでした。 I promised myself a beer or two in the pub, to wash the last of that sickness out of me. 私はパブでビールを1、2杯飲んで、最後の病気を洗い流すと約束しました。

I realized, as I slowly walked those two miles, that I knew nothing about Andrina at all. その2マイルをゆっくり歩いていると、アンドリーナについて何も知らないことに気づきました。 I had never asked, and she had said nothing. What was her father? 彼女の父親は何でしたか? Had she sisters and brothers? I had never even learned in our talks where she lived on the island. 私は彼女が島に住んでいた私たちの話でさえ学んだことがありませんでした。 It was enough that she came every evening, soon after sunset, did her quiet work in the house, and stayed a while, and left a peace behind - a feeling that a clean summer wind had blown through the heart of the house, bringing light and sweetness.

But the girl had never stopped, all last winter, asking me questions about myself - all the good and bad and exciting things that had happened to me. Of course I told her this and that. Old men love to make their past important, to make a simple life sound full of interest and great success. 老人は自分の過去を大切にし、シンプルな生活を興味と大成功に満ちたものにするのが大好きです。 I gave her stories in which I was a wild, brave seaman, who was known and feared across all the seas of the world, from Hong Kong to Durban to San Francisco. Oh, what a famous sea captain I was! ああ、なんて有名な船長だったんだ!

And the girl loved these stories, true or not true, turning the lamp down a little, to make everything more mysterious, stirring the fire into new flowers of flame...

One story I did not tell her. It is the time in my life that hurts me every time I think of it. 考えるたびに痛いのは人生の時間です。 I don't think of it often, because that time is locked up and the key is dropped deep in the Atlantic Ocean, but it is a ghost, as I said earlier, that woke during my recent illness.

On her last evening at my fireside I did, I know, tell a little of that story, just a few half-ashamed pieces of it. 私の暖炉のそばでの彼女の最後の夜に、私はその話のほんの少し、それのほんの少しの恥ずかしい部分を話しました。

Suddenly, before I had finished - did she already know the ending? 突然、私が終わる前に、彼女はすでに終わりを知っていましたか? - she had put a white look and a cold kiss on my cheek, and gone out at the door; as I learned later, for the last time. -彼女は私の頬に白い表情と冷たいキスをして、ドアに出て行った。後で学んだように、最後に。

Hurt or no, I will tell the story here and now. 痛いか否か、私は今ここで話をします。 You who look and listen are not Andrina - to you it will seem a story of rough country people, a story of the young and foolish, the young and heartless. 見たり聞いたりするあなたはアンドリーナではありません-あなたにとってそれは荒れた田舎の人々の物語、若くて愚かな、若くて無情な物語のように見えます。

In the island, fifty years ago, a young man and a young woman came together. 50年前の島では、若い男性と若い女性が集まりました。 They had known each other all their lives up to then, of course - they had sat in the school room together - but on one day in early summer this boy from one croft and this girl from another distant croft looked at each other with new eyes.

After the midsummer dance at the big house, they walked together across the hill under the wide summer night sky - it is never dark here in summertime - and came to the rocks and the sand and sea just as the sun was rising. For an hour or more they stayed there, held in the magic of that time, while the sea and the sunlight danced around them.

It was a story full of the light of a single short summer. 短い夏の光に満ちた物語でした。 The boy and the girl lived, it seemed, on each other's heartbeats. 男の子と女の子はお互いの鼓動に乗って生きていたようです。 Their parents' crofts were miles distant, but they managed to meet most days; at the crossroads, at the village shop, on the side of the hill. 彼らの両親の小作地は何マイルも離れていましたが、彼らはほとんどの日をなんとか会うことができました。交差点、村の店、丘の側で。 But really those places were too open, there were too many windows - so their feet went secretly night after night to the beach with its bird-cries, its cave, its changing waters. しかし、実際にはそれらの場所はあまりにも開いていて、窓が多すぎたので、彼らの足は毎晩、鳥の鳴き声、洞窟、変化する水があるビーチに密かに行きました。 There they could be safely alone, no one to see the gentle touches of hand and mouth, no one to hear the words that were nonsense but that became in his mouth a sweet mysterious music... そこで彼らは安全に一人でいることができ、手と口の優しいタッチを見る人は誰もいませんでした、ナンセンスであるが彼の口の中で甘い神秘的な音楽になった言葉を聞く人は誰もいませんでした... 'Sigrid.' 「シグリッド。」

The boy - his future, once the magic of this summer was over, was to go to the university in Aberdeen and there study to be a man of importance and riches, far from the simple life of a croft.

No door like that would open for Sigrid. そのようなドアはシグリッドのために開かないでしょう。 Her future was the small family croft, the digging of peat, the making of butter and cheese. But for a short time only. Her place would be beside the young man whose heartbeats she lived on, when he had finished his studies and become a teacher. They walked day after day beside the shining waters.

But one evening, at the cave, towards the end of that summer, when the fields were turning golden, she had something to tell him - a frightened, dangerous, secret thing. And at once the summertime magic was broken. He shook his head. He looked away. He looked at her again as a stranger, a cruel hateful look. 彼は再び彼女を見知らぬ人、残酷な憎しみのある表情として見ました。 She put out her hand to him, shaking a little. He pushed her away. He turned. He ran up the beach and along the path to the road above; and the golden fields closed round him and hid him from her.

And the girl was left alone at the mouth of the cave, with an even greater loneliness in the mystery ahead of her. そして、少女は洞窟の入り口に一人で残され、彼女の前の謎にはさらに大きな孤独がありました。

The young man did not go to any university. That same day he was in Hamnavoe, asking for an immediate ticket on a ship to Canada, Australia, South Africa - anywhere. その同じ日、彼はハムナボーにいて、カナダ、オーストラリア、南アフリカへの船の即時切符を求めていました。