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E-Books (english-e-reader), A Walk in Amnesia

A Walk in Amnesia

That morning my wife and I said our usual goodbyes.

She left her second cup of tea, and she followed me to the front door. She did this every day. She took from my coat a hair which was not there, and she told me to be careful. She always did this. I closed the door, and she went back to her tea.

I am a lawyer and I work very hard. My friend, Doctor Volney, told me not to work so hard. 'You'll be ill,' he said. 'A lot of people who work too hard get very tired, and suddenly they forget who they are. They can't remember anything. It's called amnesia. You need a change and a rest.'

'But I do rest,' I replied. 'On Thursday nights my wife and I play a game of cards, and on Sundays she reads me her weekly letter from her mother.'

That morning, when I was walking to work, I thought about Doctor Volney's words. I was feeling very well, and pleased with life.

When I woke up, I was on a train and feeling very uncomfortable after a long sleep. I sat back in my seat and I tried to think. After a long time, I said to myself, 'I must have a name!' I looked in my pockets. No letter. No papers. Nothing with my name on. But I found three thousand dollars. 'I must be someone,' I thought.

The train was crowded with men who were all very friendly. One of them came and sat next to me. 'Hi! My name's R.P. Bolder - Bolder and Son, from Missouri. You're going to the meeting in New York, of course? What's your name?'

I had to reply to him, so I said quickly, 'Edward Pinkhammer from Cornopolis, Kansas.'

He was reading a newspaper, but every few minutes he looked up from it, to talk to me. I understood from his conversation that he was a druggist, and he thought that I was a druggist, too.

'Are all these men druggists?' I asked.

'Yes, they are,' he answered. 'Like us, they're all going to the yearly meeting in New York.'

After a time, he held out his newspaper to me. 'Look at that,' he said. 'Here's another of those men who run away and then say that they have forgotten who they are. A man gets tired of his business and his family, and he wants to have a good time. He goes away somewhere and when they find him, he says that he doesn't know who he is, and that he can't remember anything.'

I took the paper and read this:

Denver, June 12th

Elwyn C. Bellford, an important lawyer in the town, left home three days ago and has not come back. Just before he left, he took out a lot of money from his bank. Nobody has seen him since that day. He is a quiet man who enjoys his work and is happily married. But Mr Bellford works very hard, and it is possible that he has amnesia.

'But sometimes people do forget who they are, Mr Bolder,' I said.

'Oh, come on!' Mr Bolder answered. 'It's not true, you know! These men just want something more exciting in their lives - another woman, perhaps. Something different.'

We arrived in New York at about ten o'clock at night. I took a taxi to a hotel, and I wrote the name, 'Edward Pinkhammer', in the hotel book. Suddenly I felt wild and happy - I was free. A man without a name can do anything.

The young man behind the desk at the hotel looked at me a little strangely. I had no suitcase.

'I'm here for the Druggists' Meeting,' I said. 'My suitcase is lost.' I took out some money and gave it to him.

The next day I bought a suitcase and some clothes and I began to live the life of Edward Pinkhammer. I didn't try to remember who or what I was.

The next few days in Manhattan were wonderful - the theatres, the gardens, the music, the restaurants, the night life, the beautiful girls. And during this time I learned something very important - if you want to be happy, you must be free.

Sometimes I went to quiet, expensive restaurants with soft music. Sometimes I went on the river in boats full of noisy young men and their girlfriends. And then there was Broadway, with its theatres and bright lights.

One afternoon I was going back into my hotel when a fat man came and stood in front of me.

'Hello, Bellford!' he cried loudly. 'What are you doing in New York? Is Mrs B. with you?'

'I'm sorry, but you're making a mistake, sir,' I said coldly. 'My name is Pinkhammer. Please excuse me.'

The man moved away, in surprise, and I walked over to the desk. Behind me, the man said something about a telephone.

'Give me my bill,' I said to the man behind the desk, 'and bring down my suitcase in half an hour.'

That afternoon I moved to a quiet little hotel on Fifth Avenue.

One afternoon, in one of my favourite restaurants on Broadway, I was going to my table when somebody pulled my arm.

'Mr Bedford,' a sweet voice cried.

I turned quickly and saw a woman who was sitting alone. She was about thirty and she had very beautiful eyes.

'How can you walk past me like that?' she said. 'Didn't you know me?'

I sat down at her table. Her hair was a beautiful red- gold colour.

'Are you sure you know me?' I asked.

'No.' She smiled. 'I never really knew you.'

'Well, my name is Edward Pinkhammer,' I said, 'and I'm from Kansas.'

'So, you haven't brought Mrs Bellford with you, then,' she said, and she laughed. 'You haven't changed much in fifteen years, Elwyn.'

Her wonderful eyes looked carefully at my face.

'No,' she said quietly, 'you haven't forgotten. I told you that you could never forget.'

'I'm sorry,' I answered, 'but that's the trouble. I have forgotten. I've forgotten everything.'

She laughed. 'Did you know that I married six months after you did? It was in all the newspapers.' She was silent for a minute. Then she looked up at me again. 'Tell me one thing, Elwyn,' she said softly. 'Since that night fifteen years ago, can you touch, smell, or look at white roses - and not think of me?'

'I can only say that I don't remember any of this,' I said carefully. 'I'm very sorry.' I tried to look away from her.

She smiled and stood up to leave. Then she held out her hand to me, and I took it for a second. 'Oh yes, you remember,' she said, with a sweet, unhappy smile.

'Goodbye, Elwyn Bellford.'

That night I went to the theatre and when I returned to my hotel, a quiet man in dark clothes was waiting for me.

'Mr Pinkhammer,' he said, 'can I speak with you for a minute? There's a room here.'

I followed him into a small room. A man and a woman were there. The woman was still beautiful, but her face was unhappy and tired. I liked everything about her. The man, who was about forty, came to meet me.

'Bellford,' he said, 'I'm happy to see you again. I told you that you were working too hard. Now you can come home with us. You'll soon be ad right.'

'My name', I said, 'is Edward Pinkhammer. I've never seen you before in my life.'

The woman cried out, 'Oh, Elwyn! Elwyn! I'm your wife!' She put her arms around me, but I pushed them away.

'Oh, Doctor Volney! What is the matter with him?' the woman cried.

'Go to your room,' the doctor said to her. 'He'll soon be wed again.'

The woman left, and so did the man in the dark clothes. The man who was a doctor turned to me and said quietly, 'Listen. Your name is not Edward Pinkhammer.'

'I know that,' I replied, 'but a man must have a name. Why not Pinkhammer?'

'Your name', the doctor said, 'is Elwyn Bellford. You are one of the best lawyers in Denver - and that woman is your wife.'

'She's a very fine woman,' I said, after a minute. 'I love the colour of her hair.'

'She's a very good wife,' the doctor replied. 'When you left two weeks ago, she was very unhappy. Then we had a telephone call from a man who saw you in a hotel here.'

'I think I remember him,' I said. 'He called me "Bellford". Excuse me, but who are you?'

'I'm Bobby Volney. I've been your friend for twenty years, and your doctor for fifteen years. Elwyn, try to remember.'

'You say you're a doctor,' I said. 'How can I get better? Does amnesia go slowly or suddenly?'

'Sometimes slowly. Sometimes suddenly.'

'Will you help me, Doctor Volney?' I asked.

'Old friend,' he said, 'I'll do everything possible.'

'Very well. And if you're my doctor, you can't tell anybody what I say.'

'Of course not,' Doctor Volney answered.

I stood up. There were some white roses on the table. I went over to the table, picked up the roses and threw them far out of the window. Then I sat down again.

'I think it will be best, Bobby,' I said, 'to get better suddenly. I'm a little tired of it all now. Go and bring my wife Marian in now. But, oh, Doctor,' I said with a happy smile. 'Oh, my good old friend - it was wonderful!'

- THE END -


A Walk in Amnesia

That morning my wife and I said our usual goodbyes.

She left her second cup of tea, and she followed me to the front door. She did this every day. She took from my coat a hair which was not there, and she told me to be careful. She always did this. I closed the door, and she went back to her tea.

I am a lawyer and I work very hard. My friend, Doctor Volney, told me not to work so hard. 'You'll be ill,' he said. 'A lot of people who work too hard get very tired, and suddenly they forget who they are. They can't remember anything. It's called amnesia. You need a change and a rest.'

'But I do rest,' I replied. 'On Thursday nights my wife and I play a game of cards, and on Sundays she reads me her weekly letter from her mother.'

That morning, when I was walking to work, I thought about Doctor Volney's words. I was feeling very well, and pleased with life.

When I woke up, I was on a train and feeling very uncomfortable after a long sleep. I sat back in my seat and I tried to think. After a long time, I said to myself, 'I must have a name!' 久しぶりに「名前が必要!」と自分に言い聞かせました。 I looked in my pockets. No letter. No papers. Nothing with my name on. 私の名前は何もありません。 But I found three thousand dollars. しかし、私は3000ドルを見つけました。 'I must be someone,' I thought. 「私は誰かに違いない」と私は思った。

The train was crowded with men who were all very friendly. One of them came and sat next to me. 'Hi! My name's R.P. 私の名前のRP Bolder - Bolder and Son, from Missouri. You're going to the meeting in New York, of course? もちろん、ニューヨークでの会議に行くのですか? What's your name?' あなたの名前は何ですか?'

I had to reply to him, so I said quickly, 'Edward Pinkhammer from Cornopolis, Kansas.'

He was reading a newspaper, but every few minutes he looked up from it, to talk to me. 彼は新聞を読んでいたが、数分おきに新聞から見上げて私に話しかけた。 I understood from his conversation that he was a druggist, and he thought that I was a druggist, too. 彼の会話から、彼は薬剤師であることがわかり、私も薬剤師だと思っていました。

'Are all these men druggists?' 「これらすべての男性は薬剤師ですか?」 I asked.

'Yes, they are,' he answered. 「はい、そうです」と彼は答えた。 'Like us, they're all going to the yearly meeting in New York.' 「私たちのように、彼らは皆、ニューヨークでの年次総会に行く予定です。」

After a time, he held out his newspaper to me. しばらくして、彼は私に新聞を差し出した。 'Look at that,' he said. 「それを見てください」と彼は言った。 'Here's another of those men who run away and then say that they have forgotten who they are. 「逃げて、自分が誰であるかを忘れたと言う男性のもう一人がいます。 A man gets tired of his business and his family, and he wants to have a good time. 男は仕事や家族に飽きて、楽しい時間を過ごしたいと思っています。 He goes away somewhere and when they find him, he says that he doesn't know who he is, and that he can't remember anything.'

I took the paper and read this: 私は紙を取り、これを読みました:

Denver, June 12th

Elwyn C. Bellford, an important lawyer in the town, left home three days ago and has not come back. 町の重要な弁護士であるエルウィン・C・ベルフォードは、3日前に家を出て、戻ってこなかった。 Just before he left, he took out a lot of money from his bank. Nobody has seen him since that day. He is a quiet man who enjoys his work and is happily married. 彼は仕事を楽しんで幸せに結婚している静かな男です。 But Mr Bellford works very hard, and it is possible that he has amnesia.

'But sometimes people do forget who they are, Mr Bolder,' I said.

'Oh, come on!' Mr Bolder answered. 'It's not true, you know! 「それは真実ではありません、あなたは知っています! These men just want something more exciting in their lives - another woman, perhaps. これらの男性は、自分たちの生活の中でもっとエキサイティングな何か、おそらく別の女性を望んでいます。 Something different.' 何か違います。'

We arrived in New York at about ten o'clock at night. I took a taxi to a hotel, and I wrote the name, 'Edward Pinkhammer', in the hotel book. Suddenly I felt wild and happy - I was free. A man without a name can do anything. 名前のない男は何でもできます。

The young man behind the desk at the hotel looked at me a little strangely. I had no suitcase.

'I'm here for the Druggists' Meeting,' I said. 'My suitcase is lost.' I took out some money and gave it to him. 私はいくらかのお金を取り出して彼に渡しました。

The next day I bought a suitcase and some clothes and I began to live the life of Edward Pinkhammer. 翌日、スーツケースと服を購入し、エドワード・ピンクハンマーの生活を始めました。 I didn't try to remember who or what I was. 私は自分が誰であるか、何であるかを思い出そうとはしませんでした。

The next few days in Manhattan were wonderful - the theatres, the gardens, the music, the restaurants, the night life, the beautiful girls. マンハッタンでの次の数日は素晴らしかった-劇場、庭園、音楽、レストラン、ナイトライフ、美しい女の子たち。 And during this time I learned something very important - if you want to be happy, you must be free. そしてこの間、私は非常に重要なことを学びました。あなたが幸せになりたいのなら、あなたは自由でなければなりません。

Sometimes I went to quiet, expensive restaurants with soft music. 時々私は柔らかい音楽で静かで高価なレストランに行きました。 Sometimes I went on the river in boats full of noisy young men and their girlfriends. 時々私は騒々しい若い男性と彼らのガールフレンドでいっぱいのボートで川に行きました。 And then there was Broadway, with its theatres and bright lights. そして、劇場と明るいライトのあるブロードウェイがありました。

One afternoon I was going back into my hotel when a fat man came and stood in front of me. ある日の午後、太った男が私の前に来て立っていたとき、私はホテルに戻っていました。

'Hello, Bellford!' he cried loudly. 彼は大声で泣いた。 'What are you doing in New York? Is Mrs B. with you?' B夫人はあなたと一緒ですか?」

'I'm sorry, but you're making a mistake, sir,' I said coldly. 「申し訳ありませんが、あなたは間違いを犯しています、先生」私は冷たく言った。 'My name is Pinkhammer. 「私の名前はピンクハンマーです。 Please excuse me.' すみません。'

The man moved away, in surprise, and I walked over to the desk. 男は驚いて立ち去り、私は机に向かって歩いた。 Behind me, the man said something about a telephone. 私の後ろで、その男は電話について何か言った。

'Give me my bill,' I said to the man behind the desk, 'and bring down my suitcase in half an hour.' 「請求書をください」と机の後ろの男に言った。「そして30分でスーツケースを降ろした。」

That afternoon I moved to a quiet little hotel on Fifth Avenue. その日の午後、私は五番街の静かな小さなホテルに引っ越しました。

One afternoon, in one of my favourite restaurants on Broadway, I was going to my table when somebody pulled my arm.

'Mr Bedford,' a sweet voice cried.

I turned quickly and saw a woman who was sitting alone. She was about thirty and she had very beautiful eyes.

'How can you walk past me like that?' 「どうやってそのように私を通り過ぎていくことができますか?」 she said. 'Didn't you know me?' 「あなたは私を知らなかったのですか?」

I sat down at her table. Her hair was a beautiful red- gold colour.

'Are you sure you know me?' 「あなたは私を知っていますか?」 I asked.

'No.' She smiled. 'I never really knew you.'

'Well, my name is Edward Pinkhammer,' I said, 'and I'm from Kansas.'

'So, you haven't brought Mrs Bellford with you, then,' she said, and she laughed. 'You haven't changed much in fifteen years, Elwyn.' 「あなたは15年間あまり変わっていません、エルウィン。」

Her wonderful eyes looked carefully at my face.

'No,' she said quietly, 'you haven't forgotten. 「いいえ」と彼女は静かに言いました。「あなたは忘れていません。 I told you that you could never forget.' 私はあなたが決して忘れることができないとあなたに言いました。

'I'm sorry,' I answered, 'but that's the trouble. 「ごめんなさい」と答えましたが、それが問題です。 I have forgotten. 私は忘れてしまいました。 I've forgotten everything.'

She laughed. 'Did you know that I married six months after you did? 「私が結婚してから6か月後に結婚したことをご存知ですか? It was in all the newspapers.' それはすべての新聞にありました。」 She was silent for a minute. Then she looked up at me again. 'Tell me one thing, Elwyn,' she said softly. 'Since that night fifteen years ago, can you touch, smell, or look at white roses - and not think of me?' 「15年前のその夜以来、あなたは白いバラに触れたり、匂いを嗅いだり、見たりすることができますか?そして私のことを考えないでください?」

'I can only say that I don't remember any of this,' I said carefully. 「私はこれのどれも覚えていないと言うことができるだけです」と私は注意深く言いました。 'I'm very sorry.' I tried to look away from her. 私は彼女から目をそらそうとした。

She smiled and stood up to leave. Then she held out her hand to me, and I took it for a second. 'Oh yes, you remember,' she said, with a sweet, unhappy smile.

'Goodbye, Elwyn Bellford.' 「さようなら、エルウィン・ベルフォード。」

That night I went to the theatre and when I returned to my hotel, a quiet man in dark clothes was waiting for me.

'Mr Pinkhammer,' he said, 'can I speak with you for a minute? There's a room here.'

I followed him into a small room. 私は彼を追いかけて小さな部屋に入った。 A man and a woman were there. The woman was still beautiful, but her face was unhappy and tired. I liked everything about her. The man, who was about forty, came to meet me.

'Bellford,' he said, 'I'm happy to see you again. I told you that you were working too hard. Now you can come home with us. You'll soon be ad right.' あなたはすぐに広告が正しくなるでしょう。」

'My name', I said, 'is Edward Pinkhammer. I've never seen you before in my life.'

The woman cried out, 'Oh, Elwyn! Elwyn! I'm your wife!' She put her arms around me, but I pushed them away.

'Oh, Doctor Volney! What is the matter with him?' the woman cried.

'Go to your room,' the doctor said to her. 'He'll soon be wed again.' 「彼はすぐにまた結婚するでしょう。」

The woman left, and so did the man in the dark clothes. 女性は去りました、そして、暗い服を着た男性も去りました。 The man who was a doctor turned to me and said quietly, 'Listen. Your name is not Edward Pinkhammer.'

'I know that,' I replied, 'but a man must have a name. 「私はそれを知っています、私は答えました、」しかし、人は名前を持たなければなりません。 Why not Pinkhammer?' なぜピンクハンマーではないのですか?」

'Your name', the doctor said, 'is Elwyn Bellford. You are one of the best lawyers in Denver - and that woman is your wife.'

'She's a very fine woman,' I said, after a minute. 'I love the colour of her hair.'

'She's a very good wife,' the doctor replied. 'When you left two weeks ago, she was very unhappy. Then we had a telephone call from a man who saw you in a hotel here.'

'I think I remember him,' I said. 'He called me "Bellford". Excuse me, but who are you?' すみませんが、あなたは誰ですか?」

'I'm Bobby Volney. 「私はボビー・ヴォルニーです。 I've been your friend for twenty years, and your doctor for fifteen years. Elwyn, try to remember.'

'You say you're a doctor,' I said. 「あなたはあなたが医者だと言います」と私は言いました。 'How can I get better? 「どうすれば良くなることができますか? Does amnesia go slowly or suddenly?' 健忘症はゆっくりと進行しますか、それとも突然進行しますか?」

'Sometimes slowly. Sometimes suddenly.'

'Will you help me, Doctor Volney?' I asked.

'Old friend,' he said, 'I'll do everything possible.' 「古くからの友人」と彼は言った、「私は可能な限りのことをします」。

'Very well. And if you're my doctor, you can't tell anybody what I say.' そして、あなたが私の医者なら、私が何を言っているのか誰にも言えません。」

'Of course not,' Doctor Volney answered.

I stood up. There were some white roses on the table. I went over to the table, picked up the roses and threw them far out of the window. Then I sat down again.

'I think it will be best, Bobby,' I said, 'to get better suddenly. 「ボビー、急に良くなるのが一番いいと思う」と私は言った。 I'm a little tired of it all now. 今は少しうんざりしています。 Go and bring my wife Marian in now. 妻のマリアンを連れてきてください。 But, oh, Doctor,' I said with a happy smile. しかし、ああ、ドクター」私は幸せな笑顔で言った。 'Oh, my good old friend - it was wonderful!' 「ああ、私の古き良き友人-それは素晴らしかったです!」

- THE END -