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E-Books (english-e-reader), A Moment of Madness by Thomas Hardy (2)

A Moment of Madness by Thomas Hardy (2)

She began to cry, still standing there on the beach. She did not know what to do, or even what to think. Finally, she remembered the boat, and catching the boat home seemed the easiest thing to do. So she walked to the station, arranged for someone to carry her luggage, and went down to the boat. She did all this automatically, in a kind of dream.

Just before the boat left, she heard part of a conversation which made her sure that Charles was dead. One passenger said to another, 'A man drowned here earlier today, you know. He swam out too far, they say. A stranger, I think. Some people in a boat saw him, but they couldn't get to him in time.

The boat was a long way out to sea before Baptista realized that Mr Heddegan was on the boat with her. She saw him walking towards her and quickly took the wedding ring off her left hand.

'I hope you're well, my dear?' he said. He was a healthy, red-faced man of fifty-five. 'I wanted to come across to meet you. What bad luck that you missed the boat on Saturday!'

And Baptista had to agree, and smile, and make conversation. Mr Heddegan had spoken to her before she was ready to say anything. Now the moment had passed.

When the boat arrived, her parents were there to meet her. Her father walked home beside Mr Heddegan, while her mother walked next to Baptista, talking all the time.

'I'm so happy, my child,' said Mrs Trewthen in her loud, cheerful voice, 'that you've kept your promise to marry Mr Heddegan. How busy we've been! But now things are all ready for the wedding, and a few friends and neighbours are coming in for supper this evening.' Again, the moment for confessing had passed, and Baptista stayed silent.

When they reached home, Mrs Trewthen said, 'Now, Baptista, hurry up to your room and take off your hat, then come downstairs. I must go to the kitchen.

The young woman passively obeyed her mother's orders. The evening was a great success for all except Baptista. She had no chance to tell her parents the news, and it was already much more difficult than it had been at first. By the end of the evening, when all the neighbours had left, she found herself alone in her bedroom again. She had come home with much to say, and had said none of it. She now realized that she was not brave enough to tell her story. And as the clock struck midnight, she decided it should stay untold.

Morning came, and when she thought of Charles, it was more with fear than with love. Her mother called from downstairs, 'Baptista! Time to get up! Mr Heddegan will be at the church in three-quarters of an hour!'

Baptista got out of bed, looked out of the window, and took the easy way. She put her best clothes on, confessed nothing, and kept her promise to marry David Heddegan.

CHAPTER FOUR

The honeymoon

Mr Heddegan did not worry about his new wife's coldness towards him during and after the wedding. 'I know she was reluctant to marry me,' he thought, 'but that will pass. Things'll be different in a few months' time!'

During the wedding dinner, someone asked Heddegan about the honeymoon. To Baptista's horror, he answered, 'Oh, we're going to spend a few days in Pen-zephyr.'

'What!' cried Baptista. 'I know nothing of this!' Because of her late arrival, Heddegan had not been able to ask where she would like to spend the honeymoon, so he had arranged a trip to the mainland. It was difficult to change these plans at the last minute, so she had to agree, and that evening she and her new husband arrived in Pen-zephyr.

Their first problem was finding a hotel, because the fine weather had filled the town with tourists. They walked from place to place, Heddegan polite and friendly, Baptista cold and silent. Finally they found an excellent hotel, which to their surprise was empty. Kindly Mr Heddegan, who wanted to please his young wife, asked for the best room on the first floor, with a good view of the sea.

'I'm sorry,' said the landlady, 'there's a gentleman in that room.' Then, seeing Heddegan's disappointed face, and not wishing to lose a customer, she added quickly, 'But perhaps the gentleman will agree to move to another room, and then you can have the one that you want.'

'Well, if he doesn't want a view...' said Mr Heddegan.

'Oh no, I'm sure he doesn't. And if you don't mind going for a little walk, I'll have the room ready when you return.

During their walk, Baptista was careful to choose different streets from those that she had walked down with Charles, and her white face showed how difficult this visit was for her. At last they returned to the hotel, and were shown into the best bedroom. They sat at the window, drinking tea. Although Heddegan had arranged for a sea view, to please Baptista, she did not look out of the window once, but kept her eyes on the floor and walls of the room.

Suddenly she noticed a hat on the back of the door. It was just like the hat that Charles had worn. She stared harder; yes, it was the actual hat! She fell back in her chair.

Her husband jumped up, saying worriedly, 'You're not well! What can I get ye?'

'Smelling salts!' she said quickly, her voice shaking a little. 'From the shop near the station!'

He ran out of the room. Baptista rang the bell, and when a young girl came, whispered to her, 'That hat! Whose is it?'

'Oh, I'm sorry, I'll take it away,' said the girl hurriedly. She took the hat off the door. 'It belongs to the other gentleman.

'Where is - the other gentleman?' asked Baptista.

'He's in the next room, madam. He was in here.'

'But I can't hear him! I don't think he's there.'

'He makes no noise, but he's there,' replied the girl.

Suddenly Baptista understood what the girl meant, and a cold hand lay on her heart.

'Why is he so silent?' she whispered.

'If I tell you, please don't say anything to the landlady,' begged the girl, 'or I'll lose my job! It's because he's dead. He's the young teacher who drowned yesterday. They brought his body here, and that's why there's nobody staying in the hotel. People don't like a dead body in the house. But we've changed the sheets and cleaned the room, madam!'

Just then Heddegan arrived with the smelling salts, and the girl left the room. 'Any better?' he asked Baptista.

'I don't like the hotel!' she cried. 'We'll have to leave!'

For the first time Heddegan spoke crossly to his wife.

'Now that's enough, Baptists! First you want one thing, then another! It's cost me enough, in money and words, to get this fine room, and it's too much to expect me to find another hotel at this time of the evening. We'll stay quietly here tonight, do ye hear? And find another place tomorrow.'

The young woman said no more. Her mind was cold with horror. That night she lay between the two men who she had married, David Heddegan on one side, and, on the other side through the bedroom wall, Charles Stow.

CHAPTER FIVE

Secrets discovered

Mr and Mrs Heddegan both felt the honeymoon was not a success. They were happy to return to the island and start married life together in David Heddegan's large house. Baptista soon became as calm and passive as she had been before. She even smiled when neighbours called her Mrs Heddegan, and she began to enjoy the comfortable life that a rich husband could offer her. She did nothing at all to stop people finding out about her first marriage to Charles Stow, although there was always a danger of that happening.

One evening in September, when she was standing in her garden, a workman walked past along the road. He seemed to recognize her, and spoke to her in friendly surprise.

'What! Don't you know me?' he asked.

'I'm afraid I don't,' said Baptista.

'I was your witness, madam. I was mending the church window when you and your young man came to get married. Don't you remember? The vicar called me, to be a witness.'

Baptista looked quickly around. Heddegan was at the other end of the garden but unluckily, just at that moment, he turned and walked towards the house. 'Are you coming in, my dear?' he called out to Baptista.

The workman stared at him. 'That's not your-' he began, then he saw Baptista's face and stopped. Baptista was unable to speak, and the workman began to realize that there was a little mystery here. 'I've been unlucky since then,' he continued, still staring at Baptista's white face.

'It's hard finding enough work to buy food for my wife and myself. Perhaps you could help me, because I once helped you?'

Baptista gave him some money, and hoped never to see him again. But he was cleverer than he looked. By asking questions on the island and the mainland, he soon realized that Baptista had married one man on Tuesday, and another man on Wednesday. He visited her again two days later.

'It was a mystery to me, madam!' he said, when she opened the door. 'But now I understand it all. I want to tell you, madam, that I'm not a man to make trouble between husband and wife. But I'm going back to the mainland again, and I need a little more money. If your old man finds out about your first husband, I'm sure he won't like it, will he?'

She knew he was right, and paid him what he wanted. A week later the workman sent his wife to ask for more money, and again Baptista paid. But when there was a fourth visit, she refused to pay, and shut the door in the man's surprised face.

She knew she had to tell her husband everything. She liked him better now than she had done at first, and did not want to lose him, but her secret was no longer safe. She went to find him, and said, 'David, I have something to tell you.'

'Yes, my dear,' he said with a sigh. In the last week he had been less cheerful and had seemed worried about something.

When they were both in the sitting room, she said, 'David, perhaps you will hate me for this, but I must confess something that I've hidden from you. It happened before we were married. And it's about a lover.'

'I don't mind. In fact, I was hoping it was more than that.'

'Well, it was. I met my old lover by chance, and he asked me, and - well, I married him. We were coming here to tell you, but he drowned, and I said nothing about him, and then I married you, David, for peace and quietness. Now you'll be angry with me, I know you will!'

She spoke wildly, and expected her husband to shout and scream. But instead, the old man jumped up and began to dance happily around the room.

'Oh, wonderful! he cried. How lucky! My dear Baptista, I see a way out of my difficulty - ha-ha!'

'What do you mean?' she asked, afraid he had gone mad.

'Oh my dear, I've got something to confess too! You see, I was friendly with a woman in Pen-zephyr for many years - very friendly, you could say - and in the end I married her just before she died. I kept it secret, but people here are beginning to talk. And I've got four big girls to think of-'

'Oh David, four daughters!' she cried in horror.


A Moment of Madness by Thomas Hardy (2) トーマス・ハーディによる狂気の瞬間(2)

She began to cry, still standing there on the beach. 彼女はまだ浜辺に立ったまま泣き始めた。 She did not know what to do, or even what to think. 彼女は何をすべきか、あるいは何を考えるべきかさえ知りませんでした。 Finally, she remembered the boat, and catching the boat home seemed the easiest thing to do. 最後に、彼女はボートを思い出しました、そして、ボートを家に捕まえることはするのが最も簡単なことのようでした。 So she walked to the station, arranged for someone to carry her luggage, and went down to the boat. それで彼女は駅まで歩いて、誰かが荷物を運ぶように手配し、そしてボートに降りました。 She did all this automatically, in a kind of dream. 彼女はある種の夢の中で、これらすべてを自動的に行いました。

Just before the boat left, she heard part of a conversation which made her sure that Charles was dead. ボートが去る直前に、彼女はチャールズが死んでいることを確認する会話の一部を聞いた。 One passenger said to another, 'A man drowned here earlier today, you know. ある乗客は別の乗客に言った、「今日、ここで溺死した男がいます。 He swam out too far, they say. 彼は泳ぎすぎたと彼らは言う。 A stranger, I think. 見知らぬ人だと思います。 Some people in a boat saw him, but they couldn't get to him in time. ボートに乗っている人の中には彼を見た人もいましたが、間に合わなかったのです。

The boat was a long way out to sea before Baptista realized that Mr Heddegan was on the boat with her. バプティスタがヘデガン氏が彼女と一緒にボートに乗っていることに気付く前に、ボートは海への長い道のりでした。 She saw him walking towards her and quickly took the wedding ring off her left hand. 彼女は彼が彼女に向かって歩いているのを見て、すぐに彼女の左手から結婚指輪を外しました。

'I hope you're well, my dear?' 「私はあなたが元気であることを願っています、私の愛する人?」 he said. He was a healthy, red-faced man of fifty-five. 彼は55歳の健康で赤面した男でした。 'I wanted to come across to meet you. 「私はあなたに会うために出くわしたかった。 What bad luck that you missed the boat on Saturday!' 土曜日にボートに乗り遅れたなんて運が悪かった!」

And Baptista had to agree, and smile, and make conversation. そしてバプティスタは同意し、微笑み、そして会話をしなければなりませんでした。 Mr Heddegan had spoken to her before she was ready to say anything. ヘデガン氏は、彼女が何かを言う準備ができる前に彼女に話しかけていました。 Now the moment had passed. 今、その瞬間が過ぎました。

When the boat arrived, her parents were there to meet her. ボートが到着したとき、彼女の両親は彼女に会うためにそこにいました。 Her father walked home beside Mr Heddegan, while her mother walked next to Baptista, talking all the time. 彼女の父親はヘデガン氏のそばを歩いて家に帰り、母親はバプティスタの隣を歩いていつも話していました。

'I'm so happy, my child,' said Mrs Trewthen in her loud, cheerful voice, 'that you've kept your promise to marry Mr Heddegan. 「私の子よ、私はとても幸せです」と、トレウテン夫人は彼女の大声で陽気な声で言いました。 How busy we've been! とても忙しかったです! But now things are all ready for the wedding, and a few friends and neighbours are coming in for supper this evening.' しかし、今ではすべての結婚式の準備ができており、今晩は数人の友人や隣人が夕食に来ています。 Again, the moment for confessing had passed, and Baptista stayed silent. 再び、告白する瞬間が過ぎ、バプティスタは黙っていた。

When they reached home, Mrs Trewthen said, 'Now, Baptista, hurry up to your room and take off your hat, then come downstairs. I must go to the kitchen.

The young woman passively obeyed her mother's orders. The evening was a great success for all except Baptista. 夜はバプティスタを除くすべての人にとって大成功でした。 She had no chance to tell her parents the news, and it was already much more difficult than it had been at first. 彼女は両親にその知らせを伝える機会がなく、それは当初よりもはるかに困難でした。 By the end of the evening, when all the neighbours had left, she found herself alone in her bedroom again. 夜の終わりまでに、すべての隣人が去ったとき、彼女は再び自分の寝室で一人でいることに気づきました。 She had come home with much to say, and had said none of it. 彼女は多くのことを言って家に帰ってきました、そしてそれのどれも言いませんでした。 She now realized that she was not brave enough to tell her story. 彼女は今、自分の話をするのに十分な勇気がないことに気づきました。 And as the clock struck midnight, she decided it should stay untold. そして、時計が真夜中を打ったとき、彼女はそれが語られないままであるべきだと決めました。 И когда часы пробили полночь, она решила, что это должно остаться невысказанным.

Morning came, and when she thought of Charles, it was more with fear than with love. 朝が来て、彼女がチャールズについて考えたとき、それは愛よりも恐れを持っていました。 Наступило утро, и когда она думала о Чарльзе, то скорее со страхом, чем с любовью. Her mother called from downstairs, 'Baptista! Time to get up! Mr Heddegan will be at the church in three-quarters of an hour!' ヘデガン氏は4分の3時間で教会に到着します!」

Baptista got out of bed, looked out of the window, and took the easy way. バプティスタはベッドから出て、窓の外を見て、簡単な方法を取りました。 She put her best clothes on, confessed nothing, and kept her promise to marry David Heddegan. 彼女は最高の服を着て、何も告白せず、デビッド・ヘデガンと結婚するという約束を守りました。

CHAPTER FOUR

The honeymoon

Mr Heddegan did not worry about his new wife's coldness towards him during and after the wedding. ヘデガン氏は、結婚式中および結婚式後の彼に対する彼の新しい妻の冷たさについて心配していませんでした。 'I know she was reluctant to marry me,' he thought, 'but that will pass. 「彼女が私と結婚するのを嫌がっていたのは知っている」と彼は思った。 Things'll be different in a few months' time!' 数ヶ月後には状況が変わるでしょう!」

During the wedding dinner, someone asked Heddegan about the honeymoon. 結婚披露宴の最中に、誰かが新婚旅行についてヘデガンに尋ねました。 To Baptista's horror, he answered, 'Oh, we're going to spend a few days in Pen-zephyr.' バプティスタの恐ろしさに、彼は答えました、「ああ、私たちはペンゼファーで数日過ごすつもりです」。

'What!' cried Baptista. 'I know nothing of this!' 「私はこれについて何も知りません!」 Because of her late arrival, Heddegan had not been able to ask where she would like to spend the honeymoon, so he had arranged a trip to the mainland. It was difficult to change these plans at the last minute, so she had to agree, and that evening she and her new husband arrived in Pen-zephyr.

Their first problem was finding a hotel, because the fine weather had filled the town with tourists. 彼らの最初の問題はホテルを見つけることでした。天気の良い日は町を観光客でいっぱいにしていたからです。 They walked from place to place, Heddegan polite and friendly, Baptista cold and silent. Finally they found an excellent hotel, which to their surprise was empty. ついに彼らは素晴らしいホテルを見つけましたが、驚いたことにそれは空っぽでした。 Kindly Mr Heddegan, who wanted to please his young wife, asked for the best room on the first floor, with a good view of the sea. 若い妻を喜ばせたいと思っていたヘデガン氏は、海がよく見える1階の最高の部屋を求めてくれました。

'I'm sorry,' said the landlady, 'there's a gentleman in that room.' 「ごめんなさい」と女将は言った、「その部屋には紳士がいる」。 Then, seeing Heddegan's disappointed face, and not wishing to lose a customer, she added quickly, 'But perhaps the gentleman will agree to move to another room, and then you can have the one that you want.'

'Well, if he doesn't want a view...' said Mr Heddegan. 「まあ、彼が眺めを望まないのなら...」とヘデガン氏は言った。

'Oh no, I'm sure he doesn't. 「いや、彼はそうしないと確信している。 And if you don't mind going for a little walk, I'll have the room ready when you return. 少し散歩しても構わないのなら、戻ってきたら部屋を用意しておきます。

During their walk, Baptista was careful to choose different streets from those that she had walked down with Charles, and her white face showed how difficult this visit was for her. At last they returned to the hotel, and were shown into the best bedroom. ついに彼らはホテルに戻り、最高の寝室に案内されました。 They sat at the window, drinking tea. Although Heddegan had arranged for a sea view, to please Baptista, she did not look out of the window once, but kept her eyes on the floor and walls of the room.

Suddenly she noticed a hat on the back of the door. 突然、彼女はドアの後ろに帽子があることに気づきました。 It was just like the hat that Charles had worn. チャールズがかぶった帽子のようでした。 She stared harder; yes, it was the actual hat! 彼女はもっとじっと見つめていた。はい、それは実際の帽子でした! She fell back in her chair. 彼女は椅子に腰を下ろした。

Her husband jumped up, saying worriedly, 'You're not well! 彼女の夫は心配そうに言って飛び上がった。 What can I get ye?' 私はあなたがたに何を得ることができますか?」

'Smelling salts!' 「気付け薬!」 she said quickly, her voice shaking a little. 彼女はすぐに言いました、彼女の声は少し揺れました。 'From the shop near the station!' 「駅近くのお店から!」

He ran out of the room. Baptista rang the bell, and when a young girl came, whispered to her, 'That hat! バプティスタはベルを鳴らし、若い女の子が来ると、彼女にささやきました。 Whose is it?'

'Oh, I'm sorry, I'll take it away,' said the girl hurriedly. 「ああ、ごめんなさい、私はそれを取り去ります」と女の子は急いで言いました。 She took the hat off the door. 'It belongs to the other gentleman.

'Where is - the other gentleman?' asked Baptista.

'He's in the next room, madam. He was in here.'

'But I can't hear him! 「でも、彼の声は聞こえません! I don't think he's there.' 彼がそこにいるとは思わない。」

'He makes no noise, but he's there,' replied the girl.

Suddenly Baptista understood what the girl meant, and a cold hand lay on her heart. 突然バプティスタは女の子の意味を理解し、冷たい手が彼女の心に横たわった。

'Why is he so silent?' she whispered.

'If I tell you, please don't say anything to the landlady,' begged the girl, 'or I'll lose my job! 「私があなたに言うなら、女将に何も言わないでください」、女の子に懇願しました、または私は私の仕事を失います! It's because he's dead. He's the young teacher who drowned yesterday. 彼は昨日溺死した若い先生です。 They brought his body here, and that's why there's nobody staying in the hotel. 彼らは彼の体をここに持ってきました、そしてそれがホテルに誰も滞在していない理由です。 People don't like a dead body in the house. 人々は家の中の死体が好きではありません。 But we've changed the sheets and cleaned the room, madam!'

Just then Heddegan arrived with the smelling salts, and the girl left the room. 'Any better?' 「もっといい?」 he asked Baptista.

'I don't like the hotel!' she cried. 'We'll have to leave!'

For the first time Heddegan spoke crossly to his wife. ヘデガンは初めて妻と交差して話しました。

'Now that's enough, Baptists! 「これで十分です、バプテスト! First you want one thing, then another! 最初に1つ、次に別のものが必要です。 It's cost me enough, in money and words, to get this fine room, and it's too much to expect me to find another hotel at this time of the evening. We'll stay quietly here tonight, do ye hear? 私たちは今夜ここに静かにとどまります、あなたがたは聞きますか? And find another place tomorrow.'

The young woman said no more. 若い女性はもう言いませんでした。 Her mind was cold with horror. 彼女の心は恐怖で冷たかった。 That night she lay between the two men who she had married, David Heddegan on one side, and, on the other side through the bedroom wall, Charles Stow.

CHAPTER FIVE

Secrets discovered 発見された秘密

Mr and Mrs Heddegan both felt the honeymoon was not a success. They were happy to return to the island and start married life together in David Heddegan's large house. Baptista soon became as calm and passive as she had been before. バプティスタはすぐに以前と同じように落ち着いて受動的になりました。 She even smiled when neighbours called her Mrs Heddegan, and she began to enjoy the comfortable life that a rich husband could offer her. She did nothing at all to stop people finding out about her first marriage to Charles Stow, although there was always a danger of that happening.

One evening in September, when she was standing in her garden, a workman walked past along the road. 9月のある晩、彼女が庭に立っていたとき、職人が道を通り過ぎました。 He seemed to recognize her, and spoke to her in friendly surprise. 彼は彼女を認識しているようで、友好的な驚きで彼女に話しかけました。

'What! Don't you know me?' he asked.

'I'm afraid I don't,' said Baptista. 「私はそうしないのではないかと思います」とバプティスタは言いました。

'I was your witness, madam. 「私はあなたの証人でした、マダム。 I was mending the church window when you and your young man came to get married. あなたとあなたの若い男が結婚するようになったとき、私は教会の窓を修理していました。 Don't you remember? The vicar called me, to be a witness.'

Baptista looked quickly around. バプティスタはすぐに周りを見回しました。 Heddegan was at the other end of the garden but unluckily, just at that moment, he turned and walked towards the house. ヘデガンは庭の反対側にいましたが、不幸なことに、その瞬間、彼は向きを変えて家に向かって歩きました。 'Are you coming in, my dear?' he called out to Baptista.

The workman stared at him. 'That's not your-' he began, then he saw Baptista's face and stopped. 「それはあなたではありません-」彼は始めました、そして彼はバプティスタの顔を見て止まりました。 Baptista was unable to speak, and the workman began to realize that there was a little mystery here. バプティスタは話すことができず、職人はここに少し謎があることに気づき始めました。 'I've been unlucky since then,' he continued, still staring at Baptista's white face. 「それ以来、私は運が悪かった」と彼は続け、バプティスタの白い顔を見つめた。 — С тех пор мне не везет, — продолжал он, все еще глядя на бледное лицо Баптисты.

'It's hard finding enough work to buy food for my wife and myself. 「妻と私のために食べ物を買うのに十分な仕事を見つけるのは難しいです。 Perhaps you could help me, because I once helped you?' 私がかつてあなたを助けたので、おそらくあなたは私を助けることができますか?」

Baptista gave him some money, and hoped never to see him again. バプティスタは彼にいくらかのお金を与え、二度と彼に会わないことを望んでいました。 But he was cleverer than he looked. しかし、彼は見た目より賢かった。 By asking questions on the island and the mainland, he soon realized that Baptista had married one man on Tuesday, and another man on Wednesday. He visited her again two days later.

'It was a mystery to me, madam!' 「それは私にとって謎でした、マダム!」 he said, when she opened the door. 彼女がドアを開けたとき、彼は言った。 'But now I understand it all. 「しかし今、私はそれをすべて理解しています。 I want to tell you, madam, that I'm not a man to make trouble between husband and wife. マダム、私は夫と妻の間でトラブルを起こす男ではないことを伝えたいと思います。 But I'm going back to the mainland again, and I need a little more money. If your old man finds out about your first husband, I'm sure he won't like it, will he?' あなたの老人があなたの最初の夫について知ったなら、彼はそれを気に入らないと確信していますね?」

She knew he was right, and paid him what he wanted. A week later the workman sent his wife to ask for more money, and again Baptista paid. But when there was a fourth visit, she refused to pay, and shut the door in the man's surprised face. しかし、4回目の訪問があったとき、彼女は支払いを拒否し、男の驚いた顔でドアを閉めました。

She knew she had to tell her husband everything. 彼女は夫にすべてを伝えなければならないことを知っていました。 She liked him better now than she had done at first, and did not want to lose him, but her secret was no longer safe. 彼女は最初よりも彼を好きになり、彼を失いたくなかったが、彼女の秘密はもはや安全ではなかった。 She went to find him, and said, 'David, I have something to tell you.'

'Yes, my dear,' he said with a sigh. In the last week he had been less cheerful and had seemed worried about something. 先週、彼はあまり陽気でなく、何かを心配しているようでした。

When they were both in the sitting room, she said, 'David, perhaps you will hate me for this, but I must confess something that I've hidden from you. It happened before we were married. And it's about a lover.' そして、それは恋人についてです。」

'I don't mind. '私は気にしない。 In fact, I was hoping it was more than that.' 実際、私はそれがそれ以上のものであることを望んでいました。」

'Well, it was. I met my old lover by chance, and he asked me, and - well, I married him. 私は偶然私の古い恋人に会いました、そして彼は私に尋ねました、そして-まあ、私は彼と結婚しました。 We were coming here to tell you, but he drowned, and I said nothing about him, and then I married you, David, for peace and quietness. 私たちはあなたに話すためにここに来ていました、しかし彼は溺死しました、そして私は彼について何も言わなかった、そして私は平和と静けさのためにあなた、デビッドと結婚しました。 Now you'll be angry with me, I know you will!' 今、あなたは私に腹を立てるでしょう、私はあなたがそうすることを知っています!」

She spoke wildly, and expected her husband to shout and scream. 彼女は乱暴に話し、夫が叫び声を上げることを期待していました。 But instead, the old man jumped up and began to dance happily around the room. しかし、代わりに、老人は飛び上がって、部屋の周りで楽しく踊り始めました。

'Oh, wonderful! he cried. How lucky! My dear Baptista, I see a way out of my difficulty - ha-ha!' 私の愛するバプティスタ、私は私の困難から抜け出す方法を見つけました-ハハ!」

'What do you mean?' she asked, afraid he had gone mad. 彼女は彼が怒ったのではないかと尋ねた。

'Oh my dear, I've got something to confess too! 「ああ、私も告白するものがあります! You see, I was friendly with a woman in Pen-zephyr for many years - very friendly, you could say - and in the end I married her just before she died. Видите ли, я много лет дружил с одной женщиной в Пензефире, можно сказать, очень дружил, и в конце концов женился на ней незадолго до ее смерти. I kept it secret, but people here are beginning to talk. 私はそれを秘密にしました、しかしここの人々は話し始めています。 Я держал это в секрете, но люди здесь начинают говорить. And I've got four big girls to think of-' そして、私には4人の大きな女の子がいます-」 И мне нужно думать о четырех больших девочках...

'Oh David, four daughters!' 「ああ、デビッド、4人の娘!」 «О Давид, четыре дочери!» she cried in horror. 彼女は恐怖で泣いた。 — в ужасе воскликнула она.