×

We use cookies to help make LingQ better. By visiting the site, you agree to our cookie policy.


image

The Call of Cthulhu By H. P. Lovecraft, II Part 3 The Tale Of Inspector Legrasse

II Part 3 The Tale Of Inspector Legrasse

Dark, frail, and somewhat unkempt in aspect, he turned languidly at my knock and asked me my business without rising. Then I told him who I was, he displayed some interest; for my uncle had excited his curiosity in probing his strange dreams, yet had never explained the reason for the study. I did not enlarge his knowledge in this regard, but sought with some subtlety to draw him out. In a short time I became convinced of his absolute sincerity, for he spoke of the dreams in a manner none could mistake. They and their subconscious residuum had influenced his art profoundly, and he showed me a morbid statue whose contours almost made me shake with the potency of its black suggestion. He could not recall having seen the original of this thing except in his own dream bas–relief, but the outlines had formed themselves insensibly under his hands. It was, no doubt, the giant shape he had raved of in delirium. That he really knew nothing of the hidden cult, save from what my uncle's relentless catechism had let fall, he soon made clear; and again I strove to think of some way in which he could possibly have received the weird impressions.

He talked of his dreams in a strangely poetic fashion; making me see with terrible vividness the damp Cyclopean city of slimy green stone—whose geometry, he oddly said, was all wrong—and hear with frightened expectancy the ceaseless, half–mental calling from underground: "Cthulhu fhtagn", "Cthulhu fhtagn."

These words had formed part of that dread ritual which told of dead Cthulhu's dream–vigil in his stone vault at R'lyeh, and I felt deeply moved despite my rational beliefs. Wilcox, I was sure, had heard of the cult in some casual way, and had soon forgotten it amidst the mass of his equally weird reading and imagining. Later, by virtue of its sheer impressiveness, it had found subconscious expression in dreams, in the bas–relief, and in the terrible statue I now beheld; so that his imposture upon my uncle had been a very innocent one. The youth was of a type, at once slightly affected and slightly ill–mannered, which I could never like, but I was willing enough now to admit both his genius and his honesty. I took leave of him amicably, and wish him all the success his talent promises.

The matter of the cult still remained to fascinate me, and at times I had visions of personal fame from researches into its origin and connections. I visited New Orleans, talked with Legrasse and others of that old–time raiding– party, saw the frightful image, and even questioned such of the mongrel prisoners as still survived. Old Castro, unfortunately, had been dead for some years. What I now heard so graphically at first–hand, though it was really no more than a detailed confirmation of what my uncle had written, excited me afresh; for I felt sure that I was on the track of a very real, very secret, and very ancient religion whose discovery would make me an anthropologist of note. My attitude was still one of absolute materialism, as l wish it still were, and I discounted with almost inexplicable perversity the coincidence of the dream notes and odd cuttings collected by Professor Angell.

One thing I began to suspect, and which I now fear I know, is that my uncle's death was far from natural. He fell on a narrow hill street leading up from an ancient waterfront swarming with foreign mongrels, after a careless push from a Negro sailor. I did not forget the mixed blood and marine pursuits of the cult– members in Louisiana, and would not be surprised to learn of secret methods and rites and beliefs. Legrasse and his men, it is true, have been let alone; but in Norway a certain seaman who saw things is dead. Might not the deeper inquiries of my uncle after encountering the sculptor's data have come to sinister ears?. I think Professor Angell died because he knew too much, or because he was likely to learn too much. Whether I shall go as he did remains to be seen, for I have learned much now.


II Part 3 The Tale Of Inspector Legrasse II Part 3 探长勒格拉斯的故事

Dark, frail, and somewhat unkempt in aspect, he turned languidly at my knock and asked me my business without rising. Oscuro, frágil y de aspecto un tanto descuidado, se volvió lánguidamente al oír mi llamada y me preguntó qué negocio tenía sin levantarse. 黑暗,虚弱,有点蓬头垢面,他在我敲门声时懒洋洋地转过身来,没有起身就问我有什么事。 Then I told him who I was, he displayed some interest; for my uncle had excited his curiosity in probing his strange dreams, yet had never explained the reason for the study. Entonces le dije quién era yo, mostró cierto interés; porque mi tío había excitado su curiosidad al sondear sus extraños sueños, pero nunca había explicado el motivo del estudio. I did not enlarge his knowledge in this regard, but sought with some subtlety to draw him out. No amplí su conocimiento a este respecto, pero procuré con alguna sutileza sacarlo. 我没有扩大他在这方面的知识,而是试图用一些微妙的方式把他引出来。 In a short time I became convinced of his absolute sincerity, for he spoke of the dreams in a manner none could mistake. They and their subconscious residuum had influenced his art profoundly, and he showed me a morbid statue whose contours almost made me shake with the potency of its black suggestion. Ellos y su residuo subconsciente habían influido profundamente en su arte, y me mostró una estatua morbosa cuyos contornos casi me hicieron temblar con la potencia de su sugerencia negra. He could not recall having seen the original of this thing except in his own dream bas–relief, but the outlines had formed themselves insensibly under his hands. No podía recordar haber visto el original de esta cosa excepto en el bajorrelieve de su propio sueño, pero los contornos se habían formado imperceptiblemente bajo sus manos. It was, no doubt, the giant shape he had raved of in delirium. Era, sin duda, la forma gigante de la que había delirado en su delirio. That he really knew nothing of the hidden cult, save from what my uncle's relentless catechism had let fall, he soon made clear; and again I strove to think of some way in which he could possibly have received the weird impressions. Que él realmente no sabía nada del culto oculto, excepto por lo que había dejado caer el catecismo implacable de mi tío, pronto lo dejó claro; y de nuevo me esforcé por pensar en alguna forma en la que pudiera haber recibido las extrañas impresiones.

He talked of his dreams in a strangely poetic fashion; making me see with terrible vividness the damp Cyclopean city of slimy green stone—whose geometry, he oddly said, was all wrong—and hear with frightened expectancy the ceaseless, half–mental calling from underground: "Cthulhu fhtagn", "Cthulhu fhtagn."

These words had formed part of that dread ritual which told of dead Cthulhu's dream–vigil in his stone vault at R'lyeh, and I felt deeply moved despite my rational beliefs. Estas palabras habían formado parte de ese terrible ritual que hablaba de la vigilia onírica de Cthulhu muerto en su bóveda de piedra en R'lyeh, y me sentí profundamente conmovido a pesar de mis creencias racionales. Wilcox, I was sure, had heard of the cult in some casual way, and had soon forgotten it amidst the mass of his equally weird reading and imagining. Wilcox, estaba seguro, había oído hablar del culto de alguna manera casual, y pronto lo había olvidado en medio de la masa de sus igualmente extrañas lecturas e imaginaciones. Later, by virtue of its sheer impressiveness, it had found subconscious expression in dreams, in the bas–relief, and in the terrible statue I now beheld; so that his imposture upon my uncle had been a very innocent one. Más tarde, en virtud de su mera impresión, había encontrado expresión subconsciente en los sueños, en el bajorrelieve y en la terrible estatua que ahora contemplaba; de modo que su impostura sobre mi tío había sido muy inocente. The youth was of a type, at once slightly affected and slightly ill–mannered, which I could never like, but I was willing enough now to admit both his genius and his honesty. El joven era de un tipo, a la vez un poco afectado y un poco mal educado, que nunca podría gustarme, pero ahora estaba lo suficientemente dispuesto a admitir tanto su genio como su honestidad. I took leave of him amicably, and wish him all the success his talent promises. Me despido de él amistosamente y le deseo todo el éxito que promete su talento.

The matter of the cult still remained to fascinate me, and at times I had visions of personal fame from researches into its origin and connections. El asunto del culto aún me fascinaba y, a veces, tenía visiones de fama personal a partir de investigaciones sobre su origen y conexiones. I visited New Orleans, talked with Legrasse and others of that old–time raiding– party, saw the frightful image, and even questioned such of the mongrel prisoners as still survived. Visité Nueva Orleans, hablé con Legrasse y otros de ese antiguo grupo de asalto, vi la espantosa imagen e incluso interrogué a los prisioneros mestizos que aún sobrevivían. Old Castro, unfortunately, had been dead for some years. What I now heard so graphically at first–hand, though it was really no more than a detailed confirmation of what my uncle had written, excited me afresh; for I felt sure that I was on the track of a very real, very secret, and very ancient religion whose discovery would make me an anthropologist of note. Lo que ahora escuché tan gráficamente de primera mano, aunque en realidad no era más que una confirmación detallada de lo que mi tío había escrito, me emocionó de nuevo; porque estaba seguro de que estaba sobre la pista de una religión muy real, muy secreta y muy antigua cuyo descubrimiento me convertiría en un antropólogo notable. My attitude was still one of absolute materialism, as l wish it still were, and I discounted with almost inexplicable perversity the coincidence of the dream notes and odd cuttings collected by Professor Angell.

One thing I began to suspect, and which I now fear I know, is that my uncle's death was far from natural. He fell on a narrow hill street leading up from an ancient waterfront swarming with foreign mongrels, after a careless push from a Negro sailor. I did not forget the mixed blood and marine pursuits of the cult– members in Louisiana, and would not be surprised to learn of secret methods and rites and beliefs. Legrasse and his men, it is true, have been let alone; but in Norway a certain seaman who saw things is dead. Might not the deeper inquiries of my uncle after encountering the sculptor's data have come to sinister ears?. I think Professor Angell died because he knew too much, or because he was likely to learn too much. Whether I shall go as he did remains to be seen, for I have learned much now.