×

We use cookies to help make LingQ better. By visiting the site, you agree to our cookie policy.


image

The Call of Cthulhu By H. P. Lovecraft, II Part 3 The Tale Of Inspector Legrasse

II Part 3 The Tale Of Inspector Legrasse

Dark, frail, and somewhat unkempt in aspect, he turned languidly at my knock and asked me my business without rising. Then I told him who I was, he displayed some interest; for my uncle had excited his curiosity in probing his strange dreams, yet had never explained the reason for the study. I did not enlarge his knowledge in this regard, but sought with some subtlety to draw him out. In a short time I became convinced of his absolute sincerity, for he spoke of the dreams in a manner none could mistake. They and their subconscious residuum had influenced his art profoundly, and he showed me a morbid statue whose contours almost made me shake with the potency of its black suggestion. He could not recall having seen the original of this thing except in his own dream bas–relief, but the outlines had formed themselves insensibly under his hands. It was, no doubt, the giant shape he had raved of in delirium. That he really knew nothing of the hidden cult, save from what my uncle's relentless catechism had let fall, he soon made clear; and again I strove to think of some way in which he could possibly have received the weird impressions.

He talked of his dreams in a strangely poetic fashion; making me see with terrible vividness the damp Cyclopean city of slimy green stone—whose geometry, he oddly said, was all wrong—and hear with frightened expectancy the ceaseless, half–mental calling from underground: "Cthulhu fhtagn", "Cthulhu fhtagn."

These words had formed part of that dread ritual which told of dead Cthulhu's dream–vigil in his stone vault at R'lyeh, and I felt deeply moved despite my rational beliefs. Wilcox, I was sure, had heard of the cult in some casual way, and had soon forgotten it amidst the mass of his equally weird reading and imagining. Later, by virtue of its sheer impressiveness, it had found subconscious expression in dreams, in the bas–relief, and in the terrible statue I now beheld; so that his imposture upon my uncle had been a very innocent one. The youth was of a type, at once slightly affected and slightly ill–mannered, which I could never like, but I was willing enough now to admit both his genius and his honesty. I took leave of him amicably, and wish him all the success his talent promises.

The matter of the cult still remained to fascinate me, and at times I had visions of personal fame from researches into its origin and connections. I visited New Orleans, talked with Legrasse and others of that old–time raiding– party, saw the frightful image, and even questioned such of the mongrel prisoners as still survived. Old Castro, unfortunately, had been dead for some years. What I now heard so graphically at first–hand, though it was really no more than a detailed confirmation of what my uncle had written, excited me afresh; for I felt sure that I was on the track of a very real, very secret, and very ancient religion whose discovery would make me an anthropologist of note. My attitude was still one of absolute materialism, as l wish it still were, and I discounted with almost inexplicable perversity the coincidence of the dream notes and odd cuttings collected by Professor Angell.

One thing I began to suspect, and which I now fear I know, is that my uncle's death was far from natural. He fell on a narrow hill street leading up from an ancient waterfront swarming with foreign mongrels, after a careless push from a Negro sailor. I did not forget the mixed blood and marine pursuits of the cult– members in Louisiana, and would not be surprised to learn of secret methods and rites and beliefs. Legrasse and his men, it is true, have been let alone; but in Norway a certain seaman who saw things is dead. Might not the deeper inquiries of my uncle after encountering the sculptor's data have come to sinister ears?. I think Professor Angell died because he knew too much, or because he was likely to learn too much. Whether I shall go as he did remains to be seen, for I have learned much now.


II Part 3 The Tale Of Inspector Legrasse II Teil 3 Die Geschichte von Inspektor Legrasse II Parte 3 El cuento del inspector Legrasse II Partie 3 Le conte de l'inspecteur Legrasse II Parte 3 Il racconto dell'ispettore Legrasse II 第3部 ルグラッセ警部の物語 II Część 3 Opowieść o inspektorze Legrasse II Parte 3 O Conto do Inspetor Legrasse II Часть 3 Повесть об инспекторе Леграссе II Частина 3 Казка про інспектора Леграсса II Part 3 探长勒格拉斯的故事 II 第 3 部分 莱格拉斯探长的故事 II 第 3 部分 莱格拉斯探长的故事

Dark, frail, and somewhat unkempt in aspect, he turned languidly at my knock and asked me my business without rising. Oscuro, frágil y de aspecto un tanto descuidado, se volvió lánguidamente al oír mi llamada y me preguntó qué negocio tenía sin levantarse. Темний, тендітний і дещо неохайний на вигляд, він мляво обернувся на мій стукіт і, не встаючи, запитав мене про мої справи. 黑暗,虚弱,有点蓬头垢面,他在我敲门声时懒洋洋地转过身来,没有起身就问我有什么事。 Then I told him who I was, he displayed some interest; for my uncle had excited his curiosity in probing his strange dreams, yet had never explained the reason for the study. Entonces le dije quién era yo, mostró cierto interés; porque mi tío había excitado su curiosidad al sondear sus extraños sueños, pero nunca había explicado el motivo del estudio. Тоді я сказав йому, хто я, він виявив деякий інтерес; бо мій дядько викликав його цікавість, досліджуючи його дивні сни, але так і не пояснив причину дослідження. I did not enlarge his knowledge in this regard, but sought with some subtlety to draw him out. No amplí su conocimiento a este respecto, pero procuré con alguna sutileza sacarlo. Я не розширював його знання в цьому відношенні, але намагався з деякою тонкістю витягнути його. 我没有扩大他在这方面的知识,而是试图用一些微妙的方式把他引出来。 In a short time I became convinced of his absolute sincerity, for he spoke of the dreams in a manner none could mistake. En poco tiempo me convencí de su absoluta sinceridad, porque hablaba de los sueños de una manera que nadie podía confundir. За короткий час я переконався в його цілковитій щирості, бо він говорив про сни так, як ніхто не міг помилитися. They and their subconscious residuum had influenced his art profoundly, and he showed me a morbid statue whose contours almost made me shake with the potency of its black suggestion. Ellos y su residuo subconsciente habían influido profundamente en su arte, y me mostró una estatua morbosa cuyos contornos casi me hicieron temblar con la potencia de su sugerencia negra. Вони та їхні підсвідомі залишки глибоко вплинули на його мистецтво, і він показав мені хворобливу статую, чиї контури майже змусили мене здригнутися від потужності її чорного навіювання. He could not recall having seen the original of this thing except in his own dream bas–relief, but the outlines had formed themselves insensibly under his hands. No podía recordar haber visto el original de esta cosa excepto en el bajorrelieve de su propio sueño, pero los contornos se habían formado imperceptiblemente bajo sus manos. Він не міг пригадати, що бачив оригінал цієї речі, хіба що на власному барельєфі уві сні, але контури непомітно склалися під його руками. It was, no doubt, the giant shape he had raved of in delirium. Era, sin duda, la forma gigante de la que había delirado en su delirio. Безсумнівно, це була гігантська фігура, якою він марив у маренні. That he really knew nothing of the hidden cult, save from what my uncle's relentless catechism had let fall, he soon made clear; and again I strove to think of some way in which he could possibly have received the weird impressions. Que él realmente no sabía nada del culto oculto, excepto por lo que había dejado caer el catecismo implacable de mi tío, pronto lo dejó claro; y de nuevo me esforcé por pensar en alguna forma en la que pudiera haber recibido las extrañas impresiones. Невдовзі він з’ясував, що він насправді нічого не знав про прихований культ, за винятком того, що невблаганний катехізис мого дядька зруйнував; і знову я намагався придумати, яким чином він міг би отримати дивні враження.

He talked of his dreams in a strangely poetic fashion; making me see with terrible vividness the damp Cyclopean city of slimy green stone—whose geometry, he oddly said, was all wrong—and hear with frightened expectancy the ceaseless, half–mental calling from underground: "Cthulhu fhtagn", "Cthulhu fhtagn." Hablaba de sus sueños de un modo extrañamente poético, haciéndome ver con terrible viveza la húmeda ciudad ciclópea de viscosa piedra verde -cuya geometría, decía extrañamente, era toda errónea- y oír con temerosa expectación la incesante llamada, medio mental, desde el subsuelo: "Cthulhu fhtagn", "Cthulhu fhtagn". Він розповідав про свої мрії дивно поетично; змусивши мене зі страшною жвавістю побачити вогке циклопічне місто зі слизового зеленого каменю — чия геометрія, як він дивно сказав, була неправильною — і з переляканим очікуванням почути безперервний, напівментальний заклик із-під землі: «Ктулху фтагн», «Ктулху фхтагн». "

These words had formed part of that dread ritual which told of dead Cthulhu's dream–vigil in his stone vault at R'lyeh, and I felt deeply moved despite my rational beliefs. Estas palabras habían formado parte de ese terrible ritual que hablaba de la vigilia onírica de Cthulhu muerto en su bóveda de piedra en R'lyeh, y me sentí profundamente conmovido a pesar de mis creencias racionales. Ці слова були частиною того жахливого ритуалу, який розповідав про сон мертвого Ктулху в його кам’яному склепі в Р’ліє, і я відчув глибоке зворушення, незважаючи на свої раціональні переконання. Wilcox, I was sure, had heard of the cult in some casual way, and had soon forgotten it amidst the mass of his equally weird reading and imagining. Wilcox, estaba seguro, había oído hablar del culto de alguna manera casual, y pronto lo había olvidado en medio de la masa de sus igualmente extrañas lecturas e imaginaciones. Я був упевнений, що Вілкокс якось випадково чув про культ і незабаром забув його серед маси свого не менш дивного читання та уявлень. Later, by virtue of its sheer impressiveness, it had found subconscious expression in dreams, in the bas–relief, and in the terrible statue I now beheld; so that his imposture upon my uncle had been a very innocent one. Más tarde, en virtud de su mera impresión, había encontrado expresión subconsciente en los sueños, en el bajorrelieve y en la terrible estatua que ahora contemplaba; de modo que su impostura sobre mi tío había sido muy inocente. Пізніше, завдяки своїй величезній вражаючості, воно знайшло підсвідоме вираження у снах, у барельєфі та в жахливій статуї, яку я зараз бачив; так що його обман мого дядька був дуже невинним. The youth was of a type, at once slightly affected and slightly ill–mannered, which I could never like, but I was willing enough now to admit both his genius and his honesty. El joven era de un tipo, a la vez un poco afectado y un poco mal educado, que nunca podría gustarme, pero ahora estaba lo suficientemente dispuesto a admitir tanto su genio como su honestidad. Цей юнак був одночасно злегка враженим і трохи погано вихованим, який мені ніколи не сподобався, але тепер я був готовий визнати його геніальність і чесність. I took leave of him amicably, and wish him all the success his talent promises. Me despido de él amistosamente y le deseo todo el éxito que promete su talento. Я дружньо попрощався з ним і побажав йому успіху, який обіцяє його талант.

The matter of the cult still remained to fascinate me, and at times I had visions of personal fame from researches into its origin and connections. El asunto del culto aún me fascinaba y, a veces, tenía visiones de fama personal a partir de investigaciones sobre su origen y conexiones. Питання культу все ще захоплювало мене, і часами я мав бачення особистої слави від досліджень його походження та зв’язків. I visited New Orleans, talked with Legrasse and others of that old–time raiding– party, saw the frightful image, and even questioned such of the mongrel prisoners as still survived. Visité Nueva Orleans, hablé con Legrasse y otros de ese antiguo grupo de asalto, vi la espantosa imagen e incluso interrogué a los prisioneros mestizos que aún sobrevivían. Я побував у Новому Орлеані, розмовляв із Леґрассом та іншими з того старовинного рейдового загону, побачив жахливе зображення й навіть розпитував тих ув’язнених дворняг, які ще вижили. Old Castro, unfortunately, had been dead for some years. El viejo Castro, por desgracia, llevaba muerto algunos años. What I now heard so graphically at first–hand, though it was really no more than a detailed confirmation of what my uncle had written, excited me afresh; for I felt sure that I was on the track of a very real, very secret, and very ancient religion whose discovery would make me an anthropologist of note. Lo que ahora escuché tan gráficamente de primera mano, aunque en realidad no era más que una confirmación detallada de lo que mi tío había escrito, me emocionó de nuevo; porque estaba seguro de que estaba sobre la pista de una religión muy real, muy secreta y muy antigua cuyo descubrimiento me convertiría en un antropólogo notable. Те, що я зараз почув так яскраво з перших вуст, хоч насправді це було лише детальне підтвердження того, що написав мій дядько, знову схвилювало мене; бо я був упевнений, що перебуваю на шляху дуже реальної, дуже таємної та дуже стародавньої релігії, відкриття якої зробить мене відомим антропологом. My attitude was still one of absolute materialism, as l wish it still were, and I discounted with almost inexplicable perversity the coincidence of the dream notes and odd cuttings collected by Professor Angell. Моє ставлення все ще було абсолютним матеріалізмом, яким би я і хотів бути, і я з майже незрозумілою збоченістю відкидав збіг записів уві сні та дивних вирізок, зібраних професором Енджеллом.

One thing I began to suspect, and which I now fear I know, is that my uncle's death was far from natural. Одна річ, яку я почав підозрювати, і яку тепер, боюся, знаю, полягає в тому, що смерть мого дядька була далеко не природною. He fell on a narrow hill street leading up from an ancient waterfront swarming with foreign mongrels, after a careless push from a Negro sailor. Cayó en una estrecha calle de la colina que sube desde un antiguo muelle plagado de mestizos extranjeros, tras un descuidado empujón de un marinero negro. Він упав на вузькій пагорбі вуличці, що веде від старовинної набережної, що кишіла чужоземними дворнягами, після необережного поштовху моряка-негра. I did not forget the mixed blood and marine pursuits of the cult– members in Louisiana, and would not be surprised to learn of secret methods and rites and beliefs. Я не забув про змішану кров і морську діяльність членів культу в Луїзіані, і не здивувався б, дізнавшись про таємні методи, обряди та вірування. Legrasse and his men, it is true, have been let alone; but in Norway a certain seaman who saw things is dead. Might not the deeper inquiries of my uncle after encountering the sculptor's data have come to sinister ears?. ¿No habrán llegado a oídos siniestros las indagaciones más profundas de mi tío tras conocer los datos del escultor? Чи не глибші запити мого дядька після зустрічі з даними скульптора не дійшли до зловісних вух? I think Professor Angell died because he knew too much, or because he was likely to learn too much. Creo que el profesor Angell murió porque sabía demasiado, o porque era probable que supiera demasiado. Whether I shall go as he did remains to be seen, for I have learned much now. Queda por ver si yo haré lo mismo que él, porque ahora he aprendido mucho.