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The Call of Cthulhu By H. P. Lovecraft, II Part 2 The Tale Of Inspector Legrasse

II Part 2 The Tale Of Inspector Legrasse

In a natural glade of the swamp stood a grassy island of perhaps an acre's extent, clear of trees and tolerably dry. On this now leaped and twisted a more indescribable horde of human abnormality than any but a Sime or an Angarola could paint. Void of clothing, this hybrid spawn were braying, bellowing, and writhing about a monstrous ring–shaped bonfire; in the center of which, revealed by occasional rifts in the curtain of flame, stood a great granite monolith some eight feet in height; on top of which, incongruous in its diminutiveness, rested the noxious carven statuette. From a wide circle of ten scaffolds set up at regular intervals with the flame–girt monolith as a center hung, head downward, the oddly marred bodies of the helpless squatters who had disappeared. It was inside this circle that the ring of worshipers jumped and roared, the general direction of the mass motion being from left to right in endless Bacchanal between the ring of bodies and the ring of fire.

It may have been only imagination and it may have been only echoes which induced one of the men, an excitable Spaniard, to fancy he heard antiphonal responses to the ritual from some far and unillumined spot deeper within the wood of ancient legendry and horror. This man, Joseph D. Galvez, I later met and questioned; and he proved distractingly imaginative. He indeed went so far as to hint of the faint beating of great wings, and of a glimpse of shining eyes and a mountainous white bulk beyond the remotest trees but I suppose he had been hearing too much native superstition.

Actually, the horrified pause of the men was of comparatively brief duration. Duty came first; and although there must have been nearly a hundred mongrel celebrants in the throng, the police relied on their firearms and plunged determinedly into the nauseous rout. For five minutes the resultant din and chaos were beyond description. Wild blows were struck, shots were fired, and escapes were made; but in the end Legrasse was able to count some forty–seven sullen prisoners, whom he forced to dress in haste and fall into line between two rows of policemen. Five of the worshipers lay dead, and two severely wounded ones were carried away on improvised stretchers by their fellow– prisoners. The image on the monolith, of course, was carefully removed and carried back by Legrasse.

Examined at headquarters after a trip of intense strain and weariness, the prisoners all proved to be men of a very low, mixed–blooded, and mentally aberrant type. Most were seamen, and a sprinkling of Negroes and mulattoes, largely West Indians or Brava Portuguese from the Cape Verde Islands, gave a colouring of voodooism to the heterogeneous cult. But before many questions were asked, it became manifest that something far deeper and older than Negro fetishism was involved. Degraded and ignorant as they were, the creatures held with surprising consistency to the central idea of their loathsome faith.

They worshipped, so they said, the Great Old Ones who lived ages before there were any men, and who came to the young world out of the sky. Those Old Ones were gone now, inside the earth and under the sea; but their dead bodies had told their secrets in dreams to the first men, who formed a cult which had never died. This was that cult, and the prisoners said it had always existed and always would exist, hidden in distant wastes and dark places all over the world until the time when the great priest Cthulhu, from his dark house in the mighty city of R'lyeh under the waters, should rise and bring the earth again beneath his sway. Some day he would call, when the stars were ready, and the secret cult would always be waiting to liberate him.

Meanwhile no more must be told. There was a secret which even torture could not extract. Mankind was not absolutely alone among the conscious things of earth, for shapes came out of the dark to visit the faithful few. But these were not the Great Old Ones. No man had ever seen the Old Ones. The carven idol was great Cthulhu, but none might say whether or not the others were precisely like him. No one could read the old writing now, but things were told by word of mouth. The chanted ritual was not the secret—that was never spoken aloud, only whispered. The chant meant only this: "In his house at R'lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming."

Only two of the prisoners were found sane enough to be hanged, and the rest were committed to various institutions. All denied a part in the ritual murders, and averred that the killing had been done by Black Winged Ones which had come to them from their immemorial meeting–place in the haunted wood. But of those mysterious allies no coherent account could ever be gained. What the police did extract, came mainly from the immensely aged mestizo named Castro, who claimed to have sailed to strange ports and talked with undying leaders of the cult in the mountains of China.

Old Castro remembered bits of hideous legend that paled the speculations of theosophists and made man and the world seem recent and transient indeed. There had been aeons when other Things ruled on the earth, and They had had great cities. Remains of Them, he said the deathless Chinamen had told him, were still be found as Cyclopean stones on islands in the Pacific. They all died vast epochs of time before men came, but there were arts which could revive Them when the stars had come round again to the right positions in the cycle of eternity. They had, indeed, come themselves from the stars, and brought Their images with Them.

These Great Old Ones, Castro continued, were not composed altogether of flesh and blood. They had shape—for did not this star–fashioned image prove it?—but that shape was not made of matter. When the stars were right, They could plunge from world to world through the sky; but when the stars were wrong, They could not live. But although They no longer lived, They would never really die. They all lay in stone houses in Their great city of R'lyeh, preserved by the spells of mighty Cthulhu for a glorious surrection when the stars and the earth might once more be ready for Them. But at that time some force from outside must serve to liberate Their bodies. The spells that preserved them intact likewise prevented Them from making an initial move, and They could only lie awake in the dark and think whilst uncounted millions of years rolled by. They knew all that was occurring in the universe, for Their mode of speech was transmitted thought. Even now They talked in Their tombs. When, after infinities of chaos, the first men came, the Great Old Ones spoke to the sensitive among them by moulding their dreams; for only thus could Their language reach the fleshly minds of mammals.

Then, whispered Castro, those first men formed the cult around tall idols which the Great Ones showed them; idols brought in dim eras from dark stars. That cult would never die till the stars came right again, and the secret priests would take great Cthulhu from His tomb to revive His subjects and resume His rule of earth. The time would be easy to know, for then mankind would have become as the Great Old Ones; free and wild and beyond good and evil, with laws and morals thrown aside and all men shouting and killing and levelling in joy. Then the liberated Old Ones would teach them new ways to shout and kill and revel and enjoy themselves, and all the earth would flame with a holocaust of ecstasy and freedom. Meanwhile the cult, by appropriate rites, must keep alive the memory of those ancient ways and shadow forth the prophecy of their return.

In the elder time chosen men had talked with the entombed Old Ones in dreams, but then something happened. The great stone city R'lyeh, with its monoliths and sepulchers, had sunk beneath the waves; and the deep waters, full of the one primal mystery through which not even thought can pass, had cut off the spectral intercourse. But memory never died, and the high–priests said that the city would rise again when the stars were right. Then came out of the earth the black spirits of earth, mouldy and shadowy, and full of dim rumors picked up in caverns beneath forgotten sea–bottoms. But of them old Castro dared not speak much. He cut himself off hurriedly, and no amount of persuasion or subtlety could elicit more in this direction. The size of the Old Ones, too, he curiously declined to mention. Of the cult, he said that he thought the center lay amid the pathless desert of Arabia, where Irem, the City of Pillars, dreams hidden and untouched. It was not allied to the European witch–cult, and was virtually unknown beyond its members. No book had ever really hinted of it, though the deathless Chinamen said that there were double meanings in the Necronomicon of the mad Arab Abdul Alhazred which the initiated might read as they chose, especially the much–discussed couplet:

That is not dead which can eternal lie, And with strange aeons even death may die.

Legrasse, deeply impressed and not a little bewildered, had inquired in vain concerning the historic affiliations of the cult. Castro, apparently, had told the truth when he said that it was wholly secret. The authorities at Tulane University could shed no light upon either cult or image, and now the detective had come to the highest authorities in the country and met with no more than the Greenland tale of Professor Webb.

The feverish interest aroused at the meeting by Legrasse's tale, corroborated as it was by the statuette, is echoed in the subsequent correspondence of those who attended; although scant mention occurs in the formal publications of the society. Caution is the first care of those accustomed to face occasional charlatanry and imposture. Legrasse for some time lent the image to Professor Webb, but at the latter's death it was returned to him and remains in his possession, where I viewed it not long ago. It is truly a terrible thing, and unmistakably akin to the dream–sculpture of young Wilcox.

That my uncle was excited by the tale of the sculptor I did not wonder, for what thoughts must arise upon hearing, after a knowledge of what Legrasse had learned of the cult, of a sensitive young man who had dreamed not only the figure and exact hieroglyphics of the swamp–found image and the Greenland devil tablet, but had come in his dreams upon at least three of the precise words of the formula uttered alike by Esquimaux diabolists and mongrel Louisianans?. Professor Angell's instant start on an investigation of the utmost thoroughness was eminently natural; though privately I suspected young Wilcox of having heard of the cult in some indirect way, and of having invented a series of dreams to heighten and continue the mystery at my uncle's expense. The dream– narratives and cuttings collected by the professor were, of course, strong corroboration; but the rationalism of my mind and the extravagance of the whole subject led me to adopt what I thought the most sensible conclusions. So, after thoroughly studying the manuscript again and correlating the theosophical and anthropological notes with the cult narrative of Legrasse, I made a trip to Providence to see the sculptor and give him the rebuke I thought proper for so boldly imposing upon a learned and aged man.

Wilcox still lived alone in the Fleur–de–Lys Building in Thomas Street, a hideous Victorian imitation of seventeenth century Breton Architecture which flaunts its stuccoed front amidst the lovely colonial houses on the ancient hill, and under the very shadow of the finest Georgian steeple in America, I found him at work in his rooms, and at once conceded from the specimens scattered about that his genius is indeed profound and authentic. He will, I believe, some time be heard from as one of the great decadents; for he has crystallized in clay and will one day mirror in marble those nightmares and fantasies which Arthur Machen evokes in prose, and Clark Ashton Smith makes visible in verse and in painting.


II Part 2 The Tale Of Inspector Legrasse

In a natural glade of the swamp stood a grassy island of perhaps an acre's extent, clear of trees and tolerably dry. En un claro natural del pantano había una isla cubierta de hierba de una extensión de aproximadamente un acre, libre de árboles y tolerablemente seca. On this now leaped and twisted a more indescribable horde of human abnormality than any but a Sime or an Angarola could paint. Sobre esto ahora saltaba y se retorcía una horda de anormalidad humana más indescriptible que cualquiera que no fuera un Sime o un Angarola podría pintar. Void of clothing, this hybrid spawn were braying, bellowing, and writhing about a monstrous ring–shaped bonfire; in the center of which, revealed by occasional rifts in the curtain of flame, stood a great granite monolith some eight feet in height; on top of which, incongruous in its diminutiveness, rested the noxious carven statuette. From a wide circle of ten scaffolds set up at regular intervals with the flame–girt monolith as a center hung, head downward, the oddly marred bodies of the helpless squatters who had disappeared. De un amplio círculo de diez andamios instalados a intervalos regulares con el monolito ceñido por las llamas como centro, colgaban, con la cabeza hacia abajo, los cuerpos extrañamente estropeados de los ocupantes ilegales indefensos que habían desaparecido. It was inside this circle that the ring of worshipers jumped and roared, the general direction of the mass motion being from left to right in endless Bacchanal between the ring of bodies and the ring of fire. 正是在这个圆圈内,崇拜者的戒指跳跃和咆哮,质量运动的总体方向是从左到右在身体戒指和火环之间无尽的酒神。

It may have been only imagination and it may have been only echoes which induced one of the men, an excitable Spaniard, to fancy he heard antiphonal responses to the ritual from some far and unillumined spot deeper within the wood of ancient legendry and horror. This man, Joseph D. Galvez, I later met and questioned; and he proved distractingly imaginative. Este hombre, Joseph D. Galvez, más tarde lo conocí y lo interrogué; y demostró distraer la imaginación. He indeed went so far as to hint of the faint beating of great wings, and of a glimpse of shining eyes and a mountainous white bulk beyond the remotest trees but I suppose he had been hearing too much native superstition. 他确实甚至暗示了巨大的翅膀微弱的跳动,以及在最偏远的树木之外瞥见闪亮的眼睛和山脉的白色大块,但我想他听过太多本土迷信了。

Actually, the horrified pause of the men was of comparatively brief duration. En realidad, la pausa horrorizada de los hombres fue relativamente breve. Duty came first; and although there must have been nearly a hundred mongrel celebrants in the throng, the police relied on their firearms and plunged determinedly into the nauseous rout. For five minutes the resultant din and chaos were beyond description. Durante cinco minutos, el estruendo y el caos resultantes fueron indescriptibles. Wild blows were struck, shots were fired, and escapes were made; but in the end Legrasse was able to count some forty–seven sullen prisoners, whom he forced to dress in haste and fall into line between two rows of policemen. Five of the worshipers lay dead, and two severely wounded ones were carried away on improvised stretchers by their fellow– prisoners. 五名崇拜者死去,两名受重伤的人被他们的狱友用临时搭建的担架抬走。 The image on the monolith, of course, was carefully removed and carried back by Legrasse.

Examined at headquarters after a trip of intense strain and weariness, the prisoners all proved to be men of a very low, mixed–blooded, and mentally aberrant type. Examinados en el cuartel general después de un viaje de intensa tensión y cansancio, todos los prisioneros resultaron ser hombres de un tipo muy bajo, mestizos y mentalmente aberrantes. Most were seamen, and a sprinkling of Negroes and mulattoes, largely West Indians or Brava Portuguese from the Cape Verde Islands, gave a colouring of voodooism to the heterogeneous cult. La mayoría eran marineros, y una pizca de negros y mulatos, en su mayoría indios occidentales o portugueses brava de las islas de Cabo Verde, le dio un matiz de vudú al culto heterogéneo. But before many questions were asked, it became manifest that something far deeper and older than Negro fetishism was involved. Degraded and ignorant as they were, the creatures held with surprising consistency to the central idea of their loathsome faith. Degradadas e ignorantes como eran, las criaturas se aferraron con sorprendente consistencia a la idea central de su repugnante fe.

They worshipped, so they said, the Great Old Ones who lived ages before there were any men, and who came to the young world out of the sky. Adoraban, según decían, a los Grandes Primigenios que vivieron siglos antes de que existieran los hombres, y que vinieron del cielo al joven mundo. Those Old Ones were gone now, inside the earth and under the sea; but their dead bodies had told their secrets in dreams to the first men, who formed a cult which had never died. This was that cult, and the prisoners said it had always existed and always would exist, hidden in distant wastes and dark places all over the world until the time when the great priest Cthulhu, from his dark house in the mighty city of R'lyeh under the waters, should rise and bring the earth again beneath his sway. Some day he would call, when the stars were ready, and the secret cult would always be waiting to liberate him.

Meanwhile no more must be told. There was a secret which even torture could not extract. Había un secreto que ni siquiera la tortura podía extraer. Mankind was not absolutely alone among the conscious things of earth, for shapes came out of the dark to visit the faithful few. La humanidad no estaba absolutamente sola entre las cosas conscientes de la tierra, ya que las formas surgieron de la oscuridad para visitar a unos pocos fieles. But these were not the Great Old Ones. Pero estos no eran los Grandes Antiguos. No man had ever seen the Old Ones. The carven idol was great Cthulhu, but none might say whether or not the others were precisely like him. El ídolo tallado era el gran Cthulhu, pero nadie podía decir si los demás eran o no precisamente como él. 雕刻的神像是伟大的邪神,但其他人是不是和他一模一样,谁也说不准。 No one could read the old writing now, but things were told by word of mouth. Nadie podía leer la escritura antigua ahora, pero las cosas se contaban de boca en boca. 现在没有人可以阅读旧文字,但事情是通过口耳相传的方式讲述的。 The chanted ritual was not the secret—that was never spoken aloud, only whispered. El ritual cantado no era el secreto, eso nunca se decía en voz alta, solo se susurraba. 诵经的仪式并不是秘密——它从不大声说出来,只是低声说。 The chant meant only this: "In his house at R'lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming."

Only two of the prisoners were found sane enough to be hanged, and the rest were committed to various institutions. Solo dos de los prisioneros fueron encontrados lo suficientemente cuerdos para ser ahorcados, y el resto fue enviado a varias instituciones. All denied a part in the ritual murders, and averred that the killing had been done by Black Winged Ones which had come to them from their immemorial meeting–place in the haunted wood. Todos negaron tener parte en los asesinatos rituales y afirmaron que el asesinato había sido cometido por los Alados Negros que habían venido a ellos desde su lugar de reunión inmemorial en el bosque embrujado. But of those mysterious allies no coherent account could ever be gained. Pero de esos misteriosos aliados nunca se pudo obtener un relato coherente. 但是对于那些神秘的盟友,我们永远无法获得一致的说法。 What the police did extract, came mainly from the immensely aged mestizo named Castro, who claimed to have sailed to strange ports and talked with undying leaders of the cult in the mountains of China.

Old Castro remembered bits of hideous legend that paled the speculations of theosophists and made man and the world seem recent and transient indeed. El viejo Castro recordaba fragmentos de horribles leyendas que palidecían las especulaciones de los teósofos y hacían que el hombre y el mundo parecieran recientes y transitorios. There had been aeons when other Things ruled on the earth, and They had had great cities. Hubo eones cuando otras Cosas gobernaron la tierra, y Ellos tuvieron grandes ciudades. Remains of Them, he said the deathless Chinamen had told him, were still be found as Cyclopean stones on islands in the Pacific. Restos de Ellos, dijo que le habían dicho los inmortales chinos, todavía se encontraban como piedras ciclópeas en islas del Pacífico. They all died vast epochs of time before men came, but there were arts which could revive Them when the stars had come round again to the right positions in the cycle of eternity. Todos ellos murieron vastas épocas de tiempo antes de que vinieran los hombres, pero había artes que podían revivirlos cuando las estrellas hubieran regresado a las posiciones correctas en el ciclo de la eternidad. They had, indeed, come themselves from the stars, and brought Their images with Them. De hecho, ellos mismos habían venido de las estrellas y trajeron Sus imágenes con Ellos.

These Great Old Ones, Castro continued, were not composed altogether of flesh and blood. Estos Primigenios, prosiguió Castro, no estaban compuestos del todo de carne y hueso. They had shape—for did not this star–fashioned image prove it?—but that shape was not made of matter. Tenían forma (¿no lo prueba esta imagen formada por estrellas?), pero esa forma no estaba hecha de materia. When the stars were right, They could plunge from world to world through the sky; but when the stars were wrong, They could not live. Cuando las estrellas estaban en lo cierto, podían lanzarse de mundo en mundo a través del cielo; pero cuando las estrellas se equivocaron, no pudieron vivir. But although They no longer lived, They would never really die. Pero aunque ya no vivían, en realidad nunca morirían. They all lay in stone houses in Their great city of R'lyeh, preserved by the spells of mighty Cthulhu for a glorious surrection when the stars and the earth might once more be ready for Them. Todos yacían en casas de piedra en Su gran ciudad de R'lyeh, preservada por los hechizos del poderoso Cthulhu para una gloriosa resurrección cuando las estrellas y la tierra pudieran volver a estar listas para Ellos. 他们都躺在他们伟大的城市拉莱耶的石屋里,被强大的克苏鲁的咒语保护着,以便在星星和大地再次为他们做好准备时光荣地复活。 But at that time some force from outside must serve to liberate Their bodies. Pero en ese momento alguna fuerza del exterior debe servir para liberar Sus cuerpos. 但在那个时候,必须有一些外来的力量来解放他们的身体。 The spells that preserved them intact likewise prevented Them from making an initial move, and They could only lie awake in the dark and think whilst uncounted millions of years rolled by. Los hechizos que los mantuvieron intactos también les impidieron hacer un movimiento inicial, y solo podían permanecer despiertos en la oscuridad y pensar mientras transcurrían incontables millones de años. 让他们完好无损的咒语,同样让他们无法迈出第一步,他们只能在黑暗中保持清醒,在数百万年的流逝中思考。 They knew all that was occurring in the universe, for Their mode of speech was transmitted thought. Sabían todo lo que estaba ocurriendo en el universo, porque Su modo de hablar era el pensamiento transmitido. Even now They talked in Their tombs. Incluso ahora Ellos hablaron en Sus tumbas. When, after infinities of chaos, the first men came, the Great Old Ones spoke to the sensitive among them by moulding their dreams; for only thus could Their language reach the fleshly minds of mammals. Cuando, después de infinitos caos, llegaron los primeros hombres, los Grandes Primigenios hablaron a los más sensibles moldeando sus sueños; porque sólo así Su lenguaje podría llegar a las mentes carnales de los mamíferos.

Then, whispered Castro, those first men formed the cult around tall idols which the Great Ones showed them; idols brought in dim eras from dark stars. That cult would never die till the stars came right again, and the secret priests would take great Cthulhu from His tomb to revive His subjects and resume His rule of earth. Ese culto nunca moriría hasta que las estrellas volvieran a estar bien, y los sacerdotes secretos sacarían al gran Cthulhu de Su tumba para revivir a Sus súbditos y reanudar Su dominio sobre la tierra. The time would be easy to know, for then mankind would have become as the Great Old Ones; free and wild and beyond good and evil, with laws and morals thrown aside and all men shouting and killing and levelling in joy. El tiempo sería fácil de saber, porque entonces la humanidad se habría vuelto como los Grandes Antiguos; libres y salvajes y más allá del bien y del mal, con las leyes y la moral echadas a un lado y todos los hombres gritando y matando y arrasando de alegría. Then the liberated Old Ones would teach them new ways to shout and kill and revel and enjoy themselves, and all the earth would flame with a holocaust of ecstasy and freedom. Entonces los Primigenios liberados les enseñarían nuevas formas de gritar y matar y deleitarse y divertirse, y toda la tierra ardería en un holocausto de éxtasis y libertad. Meanwhile the cult, by appropriate rites, must keep alive the memory of those ancient ways and shadow forth the prophecy of their return. Mientras tanto, el culto, mediante los ritos apropiados, debe mantener viva la memoria de esos antiguos caminos y proyectar la profecía de su regreso.

In the elder time chosen men had talked with the entombed Old Ones in dreams, but then something happened. The great stone city R'lyeh, with its monoliths and sepulchers, had sunk beneath the waves; and the deep waters, full of the one primal mystery through which not even thought can pass, had cut off the spectral intercourse. La gran ciudad de piedra R'lyeh, con sus monolitos y sepulcros, se había hundido bajo las olas; y las aguas profundas, llenas del único misterio primigenio a través del cual ni siquiera el pensamiento puede pasar, habían cortado el intercambio espectral. But memory never died, and the high–priests said that the city would rise again when the stars were right. Then came out of the earth the black spirits of earth, mouldy and shadowy, and full of dim rumors picked up in caverns beneath forgotten sea–bottoms. Entonces salieron de la tierra los espíritus negros de la tierra, mohosos y sombríos, y llenos de vagos rumores recogidos en cavernas bajo fondos marinos olvidados. But of them old Castro dared not speak much. Pero de ellos el viejo Castro no se atrevía a hablar mucho. He cut himself off hurriedly, and no amount of persuasion or subtlety could elicit more in this direction. Se cortó a sí mismo apresuradamente, y ninguna cantidad de persuasión o sutileza podría provocar más en esta dirección. The size of the Old Ones, too, he curiously declined to mention. Of the cult, he said that he thought the center lay amid the pathless desert of Arabia, where Irem, the City of Pillars, dreams hidden and untouched. Del culto, dijo que pensaba que el centro estaba en medio del desierto sin caminos de Arabia, donde Irem, la Ciudad de los Pilares, sueña escondida e intacta. It was not allied to the European witch–cult, and was virtually unknown beyond its members. No estaba aliada con el culto europeo de las brujas y era virtualmente desconocida más allá de sus miembros. No book had ever really hinted of it, though the deathless Chinamen said that there were double meanings in the Necronomicon of the mad Arab Abdul Alhazred which the initiated might read as they chose, especially the much–discussed couplet: Ningún libro lo había insinuado realmente, aunque los inmortales chinos decían que había doble sentido en el Necronomicon del loco árabe Abdul Alhazred que los iniciados podían leer como quisieran, especialmente el pareado tan discutido:

That is not dead which can eternal lie, And with strange aeons even death may die. No está muerto lo que puede yacer eternamente, y con extraños eones incluso la muerte puede morir.

Legrasse, deeply impressed and not a little bewildered, had inquired in vain concerning the historic affiliations of the cult. Legrasse, profundamente impresionado y no poco desconcertado, había preguntado en vano sobre las afiliaciones históricas del culto. Castro, apparently, had told the truth when he said that it was wholly secret. Castro, al parecer, había dicho la verdad cuando dijo que era totalmente secreto. The authorities at Tulane University could shed no light upon either cult or image, and now the detective had come to the highest authorities in the country and met with no more than the Greenland tale of Professor Webb. Las autoridades de la Universidad de Tulane no podían arrojar luz sobre el culto o la imagen, y ahora el detective había acudido a las más altas autoridades del país y se había encontrado con nada más que la historia de Groenlandia del profesor Webb.

The feverish interest aroused at the meeting by Legrasse's tale, corroborated as it was by the statuette, is echoed in the subsequent correspondence of those who attended; although scant mention occurs in the formal publications of the society. El febril interés que suscitó en la reunión el relato de Legrasse, corroborado por la estatuilla, encuentra eco en la correspondencia posterior de los asistentes; aunque se produce escasa mención en las publicaciones formales de la sociedad. Caution is the first care of those accustomed to face occasional charlatanry and imposture. La cautela es el primer cuidado de quien está acostumbrado a enfrentarse a charlatanerías e imposturas ocasionales. Legrasse for some time lent the image to Professor Webb, but at the latter's death it was returned to him and remains in his possession, where I viewed it not long ago. It is truly a terrible thing, and unmistakably akin to the dream–sculpture of young Wilcox.

That my uncle was excited by the tale of the sculptor I did not wonder, for what thoughts must arise upon hearing, after a knowledge of what Legrasse had learned of the cult, of a sensitive young man who had dreamed not only the figure and exact hieroglyphics of the swamp–found image and the Greenland devil tablet, but had come in his dreams upon at least three of the precise words of the formula uttered alike by Esquimaux diabolists and mongrel Louisianans?. No me extrañaba que mi tío se sintiera emocionado por la historia del escultor, pues qué pensamientos deben surgir al escuchar, después de conocer lo que Legrasse había aprendido del culto, a un joven sensible que había soñado no sólo con la figura y el jeroglíficos de la imagen encontrada en el pantano y la tablilla del diablo de Groenlandia, pero se había topado en sueños con al menos tres de las palabras precisas de la fórmula pronunciada por igual por diabolistas esquimales y mestizos de Luisiana. Professor Angell's instant start on an investigation of the utmost thoroughness was eminently natural; though privately I suspected young Wilcox of having heard of the cult in some indirect way, and of having invented a series of dreams to heighten and continue the mystery at my uncle's expense. El inicio instantáneo del profesor Angell en una investigación de la mayor minuciosidad fue eminentemente natural; aunque en privado sospechaba que el joven Wilcox había oído hablar del culto de alguna manera indirecta y que había inventado una serie de sueños para realzar y continuar el misterio a expensas de mi tío. The dream– narratives and cuttings collected by the professor were, of course, strong corroboration; but the rationalism of my mind and the extravagance of the whole subject led me to adopt what I thought the most sensible conclusions. Las narraciones de sueños y los recortes recopilados por el profesor fueron, por supuesto, una fuerte corroboración; pero el racionalismo de mi mente y la extravagancia de todo el tema me llevaron a adoptar lo que consideré las conclusiones más sensatas. So, after thoroughly studying the manuscript again and correlating the theosophical and anthropological notes with the cult narrative of Legrasse, I made a trip to Providence to see the sculptor and give him the rebuke I thought proper for so boldly imposing upon a learned and aged man.

Wilcox still lived alone in the Fleur–de–Lys Building in Thomas Street, a hideous Victorian imitation of seventeenth century Breton Architecture which flaunts its stuccoed front amidst the lovely colonial houses on the ancient hill, and under the very shadow of the finest Georgian steeple in America, I found him at work in his rooms, and at once conceded from the specimens scattered about that his genius is indeed profound and authentic. Wilcox todavía vivía solo en el edificio Fleur-de-Lys en Thomas Street, una espantosa imitación victoriana de la arquitectura bretona del siglo XVII que hace alarde de su fachada estucada entre las encantadoras casas coloniales de la antigua colina y bajo la sombra misma del mejor campanario georgiano. en América, lo encontré trabajando en sus habitaciones, y de inmediato concedí a partir de los especímenes esparcidos que su genio es realmente profundo y auténtico. 威尔科克斯仍然独自住在托马斯街的 Fleur-de-Lys 大楼,这是一座可怕的维多利亚时代模仿 17 世纪布列塔尼建筑的建筑,在古老山丘上可爱的殖民时期房屋中,在最好的格鲁吉亚尖顶的阴影下炫耀其粉刷的正面在美国,我发现他在他的房间里工作,从散落在各处的标本中我立刻承认,他的天才确实是深刻而真实的。 He will, I believe, some time be heard from as one of the great decadents; for he has crystallized in clay and will one day mirror in marble those nightmares and fantasies which Arthur Machen evokes in prose, and Clark Ashton Smith makes visible in verse and in painting. Creo que en algún momento se le mencionará como uno de los grandes decadentes; porque ha cristalizado en arcilla y un día reflejará en mármol esas pesadillas y fantasías que Arthur Machen evoca en prosa, y Clark Ashton Smith hace visibles en verso y en pintura. 我相信,在某个时候,他会成为伟大的颓废者之一。因为他已经在粘土中结晶,有朝一日,亚瑟·马钦在散文中唤起的噩梦和幻想会在大理石上反映出来,而克拉克·阿什顿·史密斯则在诗歌和绘画中表现出来。