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English Conversations with Cliff LMA004, LJILJANA w CLIFF #10.1

LJILJANA w CLIFF #10.1

We started today with you telling me a little bit about how things are stressful for you this week. You have a big paper that you need to do at work and you know what to do and how to do it, but it's still important, and that comes with some stress. We also talked a bit about your presentation on Friday, the five minute speech that you gave about what you've learned from your master class, and you said you didn't really like it very much. You can speak and you can fill any amount of time that you are given, but you still didn't like the way that it came out. So we talked a little bit about what we can do with that and how to get it to a place where you feel more comfortable and even take some pride in in your performance. What we landed on was blending Robin's message about authentic communication, and even a bit more specifics about what she's advocating for in terms of interview prep, with your own personal experience because in your job you do interview people and evaluate them for hiring. So we'll take her information as a concept and then blend that with your personal experience as specific examples that you can speak to. You told me that that you teach at a university. You've been doing it for nine years, but even though you've been doing it for almost a decade, you still feel the need to prepare. Not everybody does. You have colleagues who just show up to the classroom and talk, but for you, you prefer to make sure that the material is updated and have a good idea what you're going to say first. Part of that is because it's important to you that you inspire your students about the subject matter and one of the most rewarding things that you can take away from that experience is when they come to you and asked to work with you on their final project because you've inspired them and they have a real love of it. You are starting with a new batch of students in March and you're already prepped. You're looking forward to presenting it to them with some updated material. You don't get so much stage fright when talking to students, however when you get up in front of your colleagues, that can sometimes be a little bit frightening because you have to present in English a lot of times. This has a lot of professional impact and the language is an additional hurdle to jump. You told me a story about how you gave a presentation in English once to a group of esteemed professors and scientists and you had memorized the first couple of sentences in English of your presentation because you wanted to start out very strong and you wanted to make sure that you have the language just right, but when you got up there you froze and getting past those first few sentences turned out to be somewhat difficult. But then once you got into the subject matter and were talking about things that you know and things that you love instead of just trying to be flashy with a foreign language, everything flowed and everything was great. You spoke from experience and it worked wonderfully.



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LJILJANA w CLIFF #10.1

We started today with you telling me a little bit about how things are stressful for you this week. You have a big paper that you need to do at work and you know what to do and how to do it, but it's still important, and that comes with some stress. We also talked a bit about your presentation on Friday, the five minute speech that you gave about what you've learned from your master class, and you said you didn't really like it very much. You can speak and you can fill any amount of time that you are given, but you still didn't like the way that it came out. So we talked a little bit about what we can do with that and how to get it to a place where you feel more comfortable and even take some pride in in your performance. What we landed on was blending Robin's message about authentic communication, and even a bit more specifics about what she's advocating for in terms of interview prep, with your own personal experience because in your job you do interview people and evaluate them for hiring. So we'll take her information as a concept and then blend that with your personal experience as specific examples that you can speak to. You told me that that you teach at a university. You've been doing it for nine years, but even though you've been doing it for almost a decade, you still feel the need to prepare. Not everybody does. You have colleagues who just show up to the classroom and talk, but for you, you prefer to make sure that the material is updated and have a good idea what you're going to say first. Part of that is because it's important to you that you inspire your students about the subject matter and one of the most rewarding things that you can take away from that experience is when they come to you and asked to work with you on their final project because you've inspired them and they have a real love of it. You are starting with a new batch of students in March and you're already prepped. You're looking forward to presenting it to them with some updated material. You don't get so much stage fright when talking to students, however when you get up in front of your colleagues, that can sometimes be a little bit frightening because you have to present in English a lot of times. This has a lot of professional impact and the language is an additional hurdle to jump. You told me a story about how you gave a presentation in English onceĀ  to a group of esteemed professors and scientists and you had memorized the first couple of sentences in English of your presentation because you wanted to start out very strong and you wanted to make sure that you have the language just right, but when you got up there you froze and getting past those first few sentences turned out to be somewhat difficult. But then once you got into the subject matter and were talking about things that you know and things that you love instead of just trying to be flashy with a foreign language, everything flowed and everything was great. You spoke from experience and it worked wonderfully.

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