Realistically, how many known words could i get per month?

guitario gb United Kingdom

I have a concern and it involves the amount of known words on my badge compared to others. I only have 1760 words and i have been learning for over a year now. I see people like Steve and others with over 15,000. How do people achieve that so quickly?

I open a lesson, read and listen several times and lingq the words. Then i go and flashcard the session until i can do it without making a mistake. After this i download the audio and play it while i walk to work each day (30 minutes).

So should i just zoom through lessons and aim to lingq as much as possible, even if i don't fully understand each lesson before moving on to the next one?

Is it better to say, lingq 1000 words and maybe only remember 200 or only lingq 300 words and remember 200?

12000 words a year works out to about 32 words per day. How is this possible?

I would be grateful if someone could answer this for me as it is the one area of lingq that i do not fully understand.

Many thanks.

(btw I'm leaning German)

May 2011
  • Jamie ch Switzerland

    Massive LingQing is the key. Don't worry about learning the words through flashcards, as you'll forget them anyway afterwards. I have never bothered with flashcards; I sometimes do a review of vocab via the daily emails, but I don't worry about it, pretty much all my LingQs are still at status 1. When you create lots of LingQs you see the yellow words again in different content and contexts and that's how they eventually get into your brain.

    If you understand the content you're listening to/reading, move on. Try to get through as much content as possible. You'll soon see your stats reach five figures.

    May 2011
  • maths gb United Kingdom

    Hey,

    I think there's a balance. 1760 words that you know to a "deep level", like you always recognise and understand,and can maybe use actively, may be better than knowing twice as many at a more superficial level.

    I wouldn't worry too much about 100% understanding and recall of a lesson before moving on to the next one. Words will come up all the time in different contexts, which I find (like Steve says) helps me to understand and remember them. I think you can afford to be a bit more casual and move through to new texts quicker, the more of the language you hear and read, the more will sink in.

    It's only my view, and as yet I couldn't say I've reached success in my learning, but I have found it better to linkq lots, with a view to maybe only recalling a small percentage. I'll have further encounters with the words that didn't stick when I move on to new texts. So yea, don't be too hesitant to speed through more content : )

    May 2011
  • maths gb United Kingdom

    oops, Jamie got there first : )

    May 2011
  • [Jay_B] aw Aruba

    "12000 words a year works out to about 32 words per day. How is this possible?"

    ---

    Don't forget: the total word count is artificially increased by inflections and conjugations. For example: gehen, gehe, geht, gehst, ging, gegangen (etc, etc) are all individually counted. But they are stored in your brain as "gehen+[pattern]"

    May 2011
  • guitario gb United Kingdom

    @JayB

    Yeh i realise this, but still, increasing your word count by 32 a day seems a lot of work. Also, to get my word count to 12000, wouldn't i need my overall LingQ count to be double that? Since it is only known words that get put on the badge? If so then that 32 words per day would need to be far higher.

    Or am i incorrect with this assumption?

    May 2011
  • Rodrigo_Kirch br Brazil

    I basically agree with Jamie and Maths

    When I start a lesson, my objectives are:

    - Lingq all words I don't know or am not sure about the meaning.

    - set the words I know as known words.

    - and, understand the text as a whole.

    I normally follow this order...

    Open a lesson. Lingq all words I don't know. Listen to the audio N times(in the PC or mp3 player when doing other stuffs). Then I listen and read at the same time.

    If I understand the text as a whole, I go to the next lesson.

    If I'm getting bored of reading or listening, I go to the next lesson.

    If I don't understand the whole text, I look the meaning of the yellow words and/or listen to the audio some more times.

    I don't bother too much about mastering all the words of the text. To me, being able to read all the text, understand and enjoy the content is my focus. As Steve repeatedly says: when learning a language, you have to enjoy the process.

    As for flashcards, I don't review them very often. And I like to take a glance at the daily emails, without really paying too much attention.

    May 2011
  • Rodrigo_Kirch br Brazil

    If you raise a yellow word to status 4, it counts as a known word(+1 in the badge), isn't it?

    May 2011
  • Rodrigo_Kirch br Brazil

    Re-reading my last post, I had the feeling that the "isn't it?" part sounded wrong...

    Should I write "doesn't?" instead?

    Well, anyway. I meant:

    If you raise a yellow word to status 4, it counts as a known word(+1 in the badge).

    But I'm not sure. Could anyone confirm that?

    May 2011
  • Jamie ch Switzerland

    guitario,

    Just to give you some idea of how this works for someone who has over 20,000 "known" words (in French), I imported a text of about 400 words from a French news site via the Import Bookmarklet.

    Here is the breakdown.

    15 yellow words (i.e. LingQs):

    dégager

    déclarer

    s'attend

    déficit (2 times)

    attentes

    cadre

    se tient

    fixé

    centrale

    donne

    rapport (2 times)

    pivot

    restreindre

    Most of these are already quite familiar to me. I don't care; I keep them as yellow.

    33 blue words (i.e. "unknown" words):

    excédent (4 times)

    importations (3 times)

    surpassant

    douanes

    d'importations

    Peng

    Citigroup

    rééquilibrage (2 times)

    Alistair

    Thornton

    IHS

    insight

    décélération

    quinquennal

    excédents

    accélérée

    arguant

    indu

    exportateurs

    yuans

    Timothy

    Geithner

    fluctue

    Chen

    Deming

    qu'invoquer

    déséquilibre

    Obviously, some of these are people's names, company names, mnemonics etc. Some words, e.g. "excédent" ("surplus" in this context), are getting some serious punishment, which is good. You can probably guess it's a financial article. I created a couple of new LingQs. The other blue words were obvious to me, so I then clicked the "LingQ'd" button and 26 words were added to my "known" words count. The whole process took only a few minutes.

    If I did this kind of activity for a couple of hours I would probably add 200 or so "new" words to my total words count without breaking into a sweat. It's easy.

    LingQ like a maniac and import as much stuff as you can is the best advice I can give.

    May 2011
  • Jamie ch Switzerland

    When I say "import as much stuff as you can", I am of course including lessons in the LingQ library, which aren't technically imported.

    May 2011
  • [yang_guizi] aw Aruba

    I started on Sept. 22, 2010 learning French @ LingQ. I was not an absolute beginner.

    The first 50 days: 2722 LingQs, 2634 learned words

    The next 90 days: 2854 LingQs, 1942 learned words

    The next 90 days: 2464 LingQs, 1920 learned words.

    Now I lingQ about 27 words per day, and I "learn" around 21 per day, but those are very often conjugations, plural/masc/fem. forms of words I know.

    There are now 1500 words I should learn, but most of these are not very important (for me).

    May 2011
  • Moderator
    SanneT gb United Kingdom

    One thing I'd like to add: remember that you can now use the red 'Ignore this word' button for company names etc (actually, for any word that you don't want to be counted).

    May 2011
  • [yang_guizi] aw Aruba

    "How is this possible?"

    Well, you need some time to do this - 1 h per day, plus some time to listen.

    May 2011
  • Jamie ch Switzerland

    My own view is that company/person names etc. should be counted. After all, they still have to be pronounced and understood in the target language, even if you won't find them in the dictionary.

    May 2011
  • guitario gb United Kingdom

    @Jamie

    Good name :-)

    So do i assume then that what i have been doing isn't right with regards to how this site works? For example, a couple of weeks ago this was my daily plan.

    30 mins on LingQ (reading, listening on loop and LingQing'.

    30 mins listening to the same lesson on loop walking to work.

    30 mins flashcarding that lesson on my lunch break whilst listening.

    30 mins listening again on my walk home.

    The following day i would do a new lesson and repeat.

    Doing this i became good at understanding the audio and using the new words when writing with my German speaking friend, but my new words total at the end of the week only went up by about 60.

    Was what i was doing overkill and inefficient?

    May 2011
  • Administrator
    steve ca Canada

    "So should i just zoom through lessons and aim to lingq as much as possible, even if i don't fully understand each lesson before moving on to the next one? "

    Yes, absolutely. Do not expect to nail down lessons or vocabulary. The further you progress, the less often you need to listen to the same text, the less you tarry at each lesson. Good luck.

    May 2011
  • Jamie ch Switzerland

    guitario,

    How long is your typical lesson? 2 hours per lesson seems a bit excessive to me, even for a beginner in the language, although you're clearly doing the right things (lots of listening, reading the transcript and LingQing). Maybe I would cut down on the repetitions and ramp up the number of lessons instead. I would also forget about trying to "learn" the LingQs via flashcards etc., although this is a personal view based on my own experience.

    May 2011
  • guitario gb United Kingdom

    Yeh around that time give or take. I find listening hard but reading, and to a certain extent writing, comes easy to me. Hence why i am spending so much time listening to the audio. Maybe to the detriment of my vocabulary. Catch 22 maybe?

    From this evening i have zoomed through about 6 lessons in an hour. Read through 3 or 4 times and listened to the same number. LingQed the blue words and added the ones i think i know and moved on immediately. I downloaded the audio to listen to on the way to work tomorrow but from now on i will only spend 10 mins per lesson (unless there are a lot of unknown words).

    I will keep this up for a month and see what happens.

    May 2011
  • skyblueteapot gb United Kingdom

    How can listening be bad for your vocabulary?

    I listen to an hour a day and THAT'S where I learn new words. Flashcarding and going through my vocabulary list is just bookkeeping - moving the words my ears have learned for me to "known"

    May 2011
  • guitario gb United Kingdom

    I mean listening to the same dialogue for an hour every day as opposed to listening to many different dialogues per day.

    May 2011
  • alexandrec ca Canada

    First, the word count on Lingq is not an actual word count because of all the different forms which are counted separately. Nevertheless, many may feel encouraged by the increasing count of know words.

    Second, I wouldn't worry too much about word count. I know Steve has said here many times that the more words you know, the better you know the language (or some permutation thereof), but it's not that simple. As maths said earlier, actively knowing and using 10 words is a lot more useful than having a passive knowledge of 30. Then again, I personally want to be able to communicate, others may just want to read novels instead, it's all relative.

    I've been learning Japanese for a little under 3 years and I'm pretty comfortable speaking with natives, even in conversations between other natives. I figure I probably know around 3000 words, although it's hard to say for sure. That would imply that I've only learned an average of 3-4 words a day! But I can use them actively.

    May 2011
  • dooo ca Canada

    "First, the word count on Lingq is not an actual word count because of all the different forms which are counted separately"

    What is a "word" to you? "Could" is a permutation of "can". Should they be counted as one or 2 words?

    "As maths said earlier, actively knowing and using 10 words is a lot more useful than having a passive knowledge of 30."

    10 active words were at some point 10 passive words. As well, when you are listening to conversations among native speakers, how would you follow it without lots of passive vocab?

    May 2011
  • alexandrec ca Canada

    play, playing, plays, played are counted as distinct words, but they are 1 word with 3 derived forms. If you know the verb play, you know 1 word, not 4.

    "10 active words were at some point 10 passive words. As well, when you are listening to conversations among native speakers, how would you follow it without lots of passive vocab? " -- because not that many pop up.

    May 2011
  • Administrator
    steve ca Canada

    My take on this.

    The word count at LingQ is an actual word count, but it counts all forms of words as different words. This is because different forms of the same word, or word family, have different functions, and generate a different set of Example phrases in our system.

    The first step in learning a language in my view, is to understand what is said and what you read. The passive vocabulary is very important, and a good indicator of your understanding and knowledge of the language. To convert these passive words into active words, you have to hear and see them a lot, and then get active, writing and speaking. But if you don't first have the passive vocabulary it is a lot more difficult. I strongly recommend working on your passive vocabulary as the key to building your language foundation.

    To have only a limited active and passive vocabulary limits what you can do with the language. With a large passive vocabulary and more limited active vocabulary (which is normal) you can achieve a lot more.

    We also count the passive vocabulary because it is easier to do automatically in our system.

    May 2011
  • dooo ca Canada

    "different forms of the same word, or word family, have different functions, and generate a different set of Example phrases in our system. "

    Exactly. In language a change of form always signals a change in meaning and/or function. "could" and "can" are just the most obvious examples.

    "because not that many pop up. "

    So did you 500 most common Japanese words and learn active mastery without any major interval?

    May 2011
  • alexandrec ca Canada

    Sorry, could you rephrase the last question?

    What I meant was that in my case, if I know 3000 actual words (and I can't say that for sure, it might be a bit more), most conversations consist of words I know actively, words I could use myself. Of course, that happened gradually...

    But still, you can't escape the fact that many people know many words passively but can't express themselves actively. There is no doubt that the more words you know passively, the more you understand, but since I personally aim to communicate and speak the language, I concentrate a lot more on using words actively than I do on acquiring them passively. So doing, I assume I do learn words passively too, though.

    May 2011
  • dooo ca Canada

    "Sorry, could you rephrase the last question? "

    Just pointing out that passive necessarily precedes active. It is nonsense to make general comparisons about their usefulness.

    May 2011
  • alexandrec ca Canada

    Will 2 people with the same passive vocabulary necessarily have the same oral abilities? No, because one of them is bound to have a better active vocabulary. There is a difference.

    May 2011
  • Administrator
    steve ca Canada

    @alexandrec "Will 2 people with the same passive vocabulary necessarily have the same oral abilities? No, because one of them is bound to have a better active vocabulary. There is a difference. "

    Is this any different in your native language? We all have our own set of words that we like to use, and this set does not include all the word that we can recognize.

    If we could only recognize the words that we actively use, we would be severely limited in reading, watching movies, listening to radio, lectures, discussions or even every day conversation.

    May 2011
  • alexandrec ca Canada

    Perhaps we are only looking at things from a different angle. Do you mark words you know passively as known in Lingq? I only mark them as known if I know I could actually come up with the words in a conversation.

    May 2011
  • dooo ca Canada

    I only mark known the words I have no trouble recognizing passively.

    How do you know which you could come up with the words in conversation? I have always found that very unpredictable.In real conversations, I end up using words I don't remember studying while other words I "know that I know" will not reach my tongue.

    May 2011
  • Administrator
    steve ca Canada

    I rarely mark words as known. Instead I LingQ any word that I am not sure of. The rest are added to my known words count when I click "LingQ'd". Thinking that I would be able to use a word does not mean that I can recall it when I want it, nor that it is really part of my active vocabulary.

    We learn most of our words incidentally. This is especially true in our first language. Our large active vocabulary in our first language has come about from exposure to these words in reading and listening. These were words that we needed in order to understand something. They do not all become active. Some do eventually, depending on need.

    Both the active and passive vocabulary of a native speaker are usually much larger than that of the non-native speaker. If we are to converse with people, such as native speakers, who have a much larger active vocabulary than we do, we need to have a large passive vocabulary.

    May 2011
  • guitario gb United Kingdom

    For me, my immediate goal is to read books, websites and subtitles in German quickly and with decent comprehension. I am a visual learner and this is how I learnt my first language, as I could read well at age 2 believe it or not. Thus to me I am only interested in passive vocabulary right now. Eventually I wish to spend some time in Germany and when I do I will then focus on speaking.

    Therefore word count is very important to me.

    May 2011
  • maths gb United Kingdom

    On a slight tangent, I'm increasingly feeling that the idea of knowing the first few thousand words of a language, is not enough to start operating in it. I find even fairly short texts and articles meant for native speakers are pretty much incomprehensible despite "knowing" around 4000 words. Not to mention trying to understand a full speed conversation, or trying to express myself in anyway that isn't littered with mistakes and cave-man style simplicity.

    This isn't at all a complaint, just accepting that it takes vast amounts of vocab before I can give myself a chance at understanding.

    May 2011
  • Administrator
    steve ca Canada

    Lewis, that has also been my experience. However, if I am interested in the subject, I am quite content to work my way through difficult texts, with the aid of audio, and LingQ.

    May 2011
  • maths gb United Kingdom

    Ah, of course, I do just load them into LinkQ and plough through them, regardless of the difficulty level. It's encouraging for me if you've had similar experiences.

    May 2011
  • alexandrec ca Canada

    @maths about knowing 4000 words being insufficient -- I agree and disagree.

    I've never studied Portuguese, but I bet I know more than 4000 words. I wouldn't be surprised in I knew twice that.

    I don't know Norwegian that well, but I did a test: I took a small dictionary, counted words on a few pages, extrapolated over the whole book and determined what percentage of words I understand passively. Turns out I do know about 4000 words. Since I know French and Spanish, imagine how many Portuguese words I'd know! Yet, I can't speak it at all.

    However, I can speak Japanese. Do I know 4000 words? I doubt it. But the words I do know are the most common ones, not rare cognates, and I know how to use them.

    Looking at my passive vocabulary in Japanese and Portuguese, you'd think I know Portuguese better, but it's the reverse. I probably could read more complex texts in Portuguese, but I can't speak it at all.

    In other words, passive vocabulary says absolutely nothing about your speaking ability.

    May 2011
  • guitario gb United Kingdom

    @alexandrec

    Agreed but at the same time there are people who have memorised a few hundred stock phrases but can't understand a word said back to them. So they can't engage in conversation.

    In my opinion there is nothing wrong with having a large passive vocabulary and a small active one. I remember as a child i could watch the news and understand most of it, yet when i spoke it was with the equivalent of Winnie the Pooh!

    My mum could still understand exactly what i wanted though... especially when i screamed! :-)

    May 2011
  • Fingerhut de Germany

    @alexandrec: I agree completely. I'm able to read Dutch, Danish Norwegian and Swedish texts, even though I never studied any of those languages except Swedish - and that has not been a very deep study either.

    As to roman languages like Spanish, Italian or Portuguese, I can manage getting the meaning of texts as well, as I have some (rather bad) knowledge of Latin and French.

    Reading a Japanese text is at least as challenging as a Spanish one, however, that's the language I consider the second best among my foreign languages (English is still better). Especially difficult are 'difficult' words, i.e. scientific terms and so on. In almost all European languages those words have their roots in Latin, so you can easily guess what 'grammar'/'grammaire'/'Grammatik'/'grammatik'/'grammatica' means, even if you never deliberately studied that word as 'new' vocabulary. However, in Japanese, 'difficult' words remain difficult. The amount of words you can guess is by far smaller, especially if you're not having full command of kanji (which makes understanding or rather guessing easier in some cases).

    So I think, there are languages in which you can reach a high level of passive understanding very easily and in almost no time, whereas there are other languages which you really need to study and in which your passive and active vocabulary don't differ too much.

    According to that one should probably focus on the 'weaker' point of each language, i.e. for me for example reading skills in Japanese or correct active usage of articles (genders) in French or Swedish.

    May 2011
  • maths gb United Kingdom

    @alexandrec

    Hey, yes I can totally understand that passive/cognate understanding of a related language (in your case French and Spanish crossing over to Portuguese) would certainly make understanding texts, and some audio comprehension possible, whilst not leading to any ability to speak. I am would also agree that a solid command (instant recall and recognition in conversation) of 4000 words can be better than a looser and more passive knowledge of more words (7000+ or whatever), in communicating to some degree.

    I'm sure you can converse in Japanese but I'd be really interested to know if you really know only 4000 words? As I'm starting to find that I can't get through a full sentences of most everday media (in Russian) without coming across an unknown word which is essential to the meaning of the phrase. So the possibility of understanding all but the most sympathetic native in conversation at this point is pretty much impossible for me at this stage. again, I'm totally not doubting what you say, just interested to know what it takes to start operating in a new language.

    May 2011
  • skyblueteapot gb United Kingdom

    "I'm totally not doubting what you say, just interested to know what it takes to start operating in a new language. "

    What do you mean by starting to operate?

    eg, in the short term maybe you want to be able to SPEAK so that you are understood. (That's a native two-year-old's goal, also probably a tourist's). You focus on learning maybe 1000 words (that's 1000 LingQs learned), how to pronounce them, what contexts you can use them in. You find natives who will patiently listen to you expressing simple needs, demands, comments (Please show me, on this map, where Fortnum and Mason's is) and give you feedback on how well you have make yourself understood. You will need to clock up maybe 15 hours of LingQ speaking time to meet that goal.

    In Japanese, in the short term I want to be able to READ websites. So I need a very number of LingQs created, with kanji - English translations, and a high number of words read (maybe 100 000).

    In Russian, I focussed on being able to LISTEN to books and podcasts. For that you need a very high passive vocabulary (ie no of known words) and to be able to translate the spoken word into English in your head in real time (maybe 1000 hours of listening time).

    With German I focussed on WRITING, which needs maybe an active vocabulary of a few thousand words (4000 learned LingQs say), and maybe 5 to 10 000 words of writing.

    I encourage would encourage everyone to write their short-term goals on their LingQ profile pages, then a tutor can see at a glance how well they are working towards them.

    May 2011
  • maths gb United Kingdom

    @skyblueteapot

    Good point, I guess my idea of "starting to operate" was/is actually quite high:

    : Being able to understand, and be understood on a broad range of daily subjects in conversation

    : Being able to read short news articles without too much technical language

    : An acceptable level of grammar mistakes, few enough that a native speaker doesn't have to try too hard to understand.

    A guess I mean using the language without expecting too much sympathy from a native speaker or text. Which come to think of it probably doesn't fit the idea of "starting to operate" .

    May 2011
  • dooo ca Canada

    "(maths)I am would also agree that a solid command (instant recall and recognition in conversation) of 4000 words can be better than a looser and more passive knowledge of more words (7000+ or whatever), in communicating to some degree. "

    Well of course. But 4000 active words are buoyed up by 4000x passive ones, with "x" = 6 or 7. Is the argument that "x" should be as small as possible?

    How do you get active vocabulary without a passive "gestation" period, in the meantime picking up more passive vocab?

    May 2011
  • maths gb United Kingdom

    @dooo

    I'm totally in the "passive vocab first" camp. | don't see any other way it can happen. The next paragraph in my post was asking if 4000 words total, is really the upper limit if you have 4000 active words. I think we are in agreement?

    May 2011
  • alexandrec ca Canada

    @dooo

    "How do you get active vocabulary without a passive "gestation" period, in the meantime picking up more passive vocab?"

    Obviously, any word you know actively was inevitably once known passively, but the less accessible the learned language is (say Japanese vs. Portuguese for a Spanish speaker), and the more efficient the learner is, the less words remain passive only. In the Portuguese scenario, the passive vocab is extremely easy to build up to huge numbers, but if the passive vocabulary in Japanese is only a quarter of that size and still includes 90% of the most common words, then the speaker's ability could potentially be the same in both languages.

    We are arguing over details, but the heart of the matter to me is that it's not true that a passive vocabulary of 20,000 implies better speaking ability or communication than a passive vocab of 4,000.

    May 2011
  • dooo ca Canada

    "and the more efficient the learner is, the less words remain passive only"

    I guess my basic question is: How does one become more efficient in activating passive vocab?

    May 2011
  • alexandrec ca Canada

    By opting for more active speaking activities with native speakers rather than passive learning activities done alone, for one thing.

    May 2011
  • skyblueteapot gb United Kingdom

    @maths: sounds like a good intermediate 2, then.

    May 2011
  • dooo ca Canada

    "By opting for more active speaking activities with native speakers rather than passive learning activities done alone, for one thing."

    Assuming this is an option, IE you live in a cosmopolitan situation like a large-ish city or a university town, how can you control what vocab you "activate"? You cannot control the discourse to that extent... or can you?

    May 2011
  • Jamie ch Switzerland

    @alexandrec:

    "We are arguing over details, but the heart of the matter to me is that it's not true that a passive vocabulary of 20,000 implies better speaking ability or communication than a passive vocab of 4,000."

    I disagree completely. More passive vocabulary leads to more active vocabulary. It's as simple as that.

    May 2011
  • Fingerhut de Germany

    Moreover, communication skills rely on understanding, too. A large passive vocabulary guarantees that I can understand others.

    I have been through a time, when I could make myself understood to Japanese but couldn't understand their answers or questions. I really don't think that is a good thing to aim for. Even now, I rather struggle with understanding in conversations than with articulating my own thoughts. As soon as you're thinking in a language and build sentences entirely in that language, you tend to only think within the limits of your known vocabulary.

    Of course, I can say 「本を読むのが大好き」but if I don't understand if someone refers to the same thing as 「読書」, I won't understand. (Or a English speaker using 'scent' instead of 'fragrance', thus puzzling me completely etc.)

    I don't need 5 words for the same thing in my active vocabulary, even in my mother tongue I tend to use the same words over and over and there a few more which I use rarely, even more probably, I rarely ever speak out myself. But I do need these different words in my passive vocabulary or I will surely fail in conversation.

    May 2011
  • Fingerhut de Germany

    Oh, that is a strange usage of commas in my last paragraph... I wanted to say that probably most words I know passively in my mother tongue I hardly ever use.

    May 2011
  • Kannibalisch ca Canada

    The way I see it is... If a word is important to know, you will come across it a lot, and every time you come across it, you will know it a bit better. It should be a very natural process.

    Cramming the important words (say... the 2000 most common words) through flash cards is absolutely pointless because if they really are so common and important, you will read them soooo many times that soon they'll permanently become part of your vocabulary. So just stick to reading and understanding, flash cards are for more obscure words that you need for a test the next day and the like.

    Anyways, I'm no language expert. Good luck with your studies!

    May 2011
  • guitario gb United Kingdom

    I was just wondering. Today i came across the word 'sicht' which means 'view' in German. Now i just clicked known as i knew it was something to do with seeing, although i didn't exactly know how it differed from 'sehe, sehen, gesehen, sieht' etc.

    Is it Okay to click it as known because i knew roughly what it means or should i know exactly before clicking?

    May 2011
  • maths gb United Kingdom

    click it known!

    you're fine, if you recognise it in context you know it pretty well. you can find out the finer grammatical nuances later.

    May 2011
  • Fingerhut de Germany

    I probably wouldn't mark 'sehe' and 'gesehen' as two lingqs, but I would add an extra lingq for 'Sicht', as this is related (originally stemming from 'sehen') , but not the same word. As you mentioned it's a noun, meaning 'view/sight'. There are even other words that stem from the noun 'Sicht' - for example the verb 'sichten', which means not 'to see' (like 'sehen'), but 'to sight/ to sort / to sift /to catch sight of' and so on. (as you realize 'sehen' and 'to see' is closely related, as well as 'Sicht' and 'sight'.)

    Anyway, it's up to everyone's own judgement whether a related word needs lingquing or whether it is easy-peasy. :-) I lingq related words, if they don't match completely the patterns of word formation that are familiar to me. So I probably wouldn't mark 'das Schreiben', if I already marked 'schreiben', but I would definitely mark 'die Schrift'. :-)

    May 2011
  • peter au Australia

    I would probably click it as known. If it comes up later in a context where you don't understand it, then LingQ it. No harm done.

    May 2011
  • guitario gb United Kingdom

    Okay thanks for your replies.

    May 2011
  • Administrator
    steve ca Canada

    I guess everyone has to figure out how they like to LingQ.

    I generally LingQ any form of a word that I am not confident using. This creates a new yellow LingQ, which I will notice the next time it comes up, helping me notice it, and get used to it. Not all forms of a word are equally easy to remember, (cases, or different verb endings), so seeing the different forms highlighted helps me.

    Each time I save a different form of a word, this captures a different phrase. I often edit this phrase, which also helps me remember this form.

    If these words begin with, or contain the same root, I can review them together in the Vocab section. I can also move them to "known" in batches in the Vocab section later if I want to get rid of them.

    But it does not really matter. At other times I may choose to ignore words that I kind of think I know.

    May 2011