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GCSE Greek 2017, Herodotus Amasis, Euenius, Pactyas, Intro - Part 2, the Treasure House

Intro - Part 2, the Treasure House

You have finished the initial course.

If you enjoyed it, please go on and read the remaining chapters 1.7 to 1.11 to see what happened next. Then test yourself at the end.

If you wish to print out separately the Greek text, translation or transcription, click on the icons above.

The rest of this lesson is a spoken translation of 1.7 to 1.11

TRANSLATION 1.7 to 1.11

1.7 the First counter-Ruse: the spilt wine

And he, even when saying many things still he was not persuading his mother, at first he was despairing.

But quickly having devised something he fitted out for himself donkeys and filled full of wine wineskins , and in this way having placed the wineskins upon the donkeys he was driving towards the city-wall. And when driving he became near of those guarding the hanging corpse, then he escapes notice untying two or three necks of the wineskins.

And when the wine was pouring out, he was beating his head and was shouting loudly, as if not having at all towards which donkey he should turn to first. Then the guards, seeing the wine flowing much, run together into the street holding wine-jars, and they collect up the wine having been poured out, considering the matter in a gain. But he does not cease yelling at everything, pretending anger of course.

ii The Thief Fraternises with the Police

And with the guards [genitive absolute] encouraging him, he pretends in time to be calming down and to cease from his anger.

And in the end, he drives the donkeys off the street, as if being about to fit out them again.

Then they, between talking with and joking a bit brought him to laughter. And he, as if delighted by their jokings, gave free to them one of the wineskins.

So then the guards having lain down on the spot, just as they were, began drinking, and they invited over him and told also himself remaining with themselves to drink with . And he agreed, and remained.

iii The Watchers Sleep And since drinking they welcomed him kindly, he gave to them also another of the wine-skins. And indulging in the drinking a lot the guards became extremely drunk, and moreover overcome by sleep they fell into slumber right there, where they were drinking.

Then he, with night now having come, not only released the body of his brother, but also by way of insult shaved the right cheeks of all the guards.

And in this way then having placed the corpse onto the donkeys he drove off homeward, having carried out the things ordered by his mother .

1.8 the King's Second Ruse: A Kiss for a Secret Now the king, when he heard the body of the thief to have escaped notice having been stolen away, was very upset. [lit. made for himself terrible]

And totally wishing to know who on earth might be he having devised these things is said to have done also these things, to me not believable. He is said also to have set down in the chamber the daughter the of himself, (she happened being very beautiful ) having instructed to welcome all men alike, and if anyone were to wish to kiss her with his mouth, to promise: " Certainly to be about to kiss him, if he should tell to her what thing in his life he has done the cleverest and the most shocking. And whoever should describe the things having taken place regarding the thief, to arrest this man and not to let him go outside.

1.9 the Second Counter Ruse – i. the Dead hand

And the daughter was doing the things ordered by her father. The thief (for he realised I suppose the the sake of what these are being done) wished even so to get ahead of the king in cunning tricks.

Having cut off therefore the hand of some recently killed dead man he went having this hidden under his cloak.

And in this way going in to the daughter of the king he was asked the same things what things also the others .

And he described, how he was having done the most shocking thing, when he cut off the head of his brother captured by the trap in the treasure-house of the king; while the cleverest, when having made drunk the guards, he escaped notice having released the hanging corpse of his brother.

1.10 Wit Wins the Day

And she when she heard, was grabbing of him, but the thief stretched out to her the hand of the dead man.

And she, on account of her eagerness not seeing clearly, having seized held tight of [=to] it. For she thought to be holding tight of the hand of him himself. And so the thief having put out to her this hand he went off escaping through the doors.

1.11 the Reward of Merit

And when these things were reported back to the king at first he was astonished by the cleverness and by the daring of the man.

And in the end, having sent out to all the cities, he announced that not so that the thief should pay the penalty if he were to come into the sight of himself but even he would gain great things.

Having heard then these the thief trusted and came to him.

And Rhampsinitos was impressed and joined in marriage to him that daughter as knowing the most of men. For. he said, " the Egyptians to have excelled other men in wisdom, but him the Egyptians."


Intro - Part 2, the Treasure House

You have finished the initial course.

If you enjoyed it, please go on and read the remaining chapters 1.7 to 1.11 to see what happened next. Then test yourself at the end.

If you wish to print out separately the Greek text, translation or transcription, click on the icons above.

The rest of this lesson is a spoken translation of 1.7 to 1.11

** TRANSLATION 1.7 to 1.11 **

1.7 the First counter-Ruse: the spilt wine

And he, even when saying many things still he was not persuading his mother, at first he was despairing.

But quickly having devised something he fitted out for himself donkeys and filled full of wine wineskins , and in this way having placed the wineskins upon the donkeys he was driving towards the city-wall. And when driving he became near of those guarding the hanging corpse, then he escapes notice untying two or three necks of the wineskins.

And when the wine was pouring out, he was beating his head and was shouting loudly, as if not having at all towards which donkey he should turn to first. Then the guards, seeing the wine flowing much, run together into the street holding wine-jars, and they collect up the wine having been poured out, considering the matter in a gain. But he does not cease yelling at everything, pretending anger of course.

ii The Thief Fraternises with the Police

And with the guards [genitive absolute] encouraging him, he pretends in time to be calming down and to cease from his anger.

And in the end, he drives the donkeys off the street, as if being about to fit out them again.

Then they, between talking with and joking a bit brought him to laughter. And he, as if delighted by their jokings, gave free to them one of the wineskins.

So then the guards having lain down on the spot, just as they were, began drinking, and they invited over him and told also himself remaining with themselves to drink with . And he agreed, and remained.

iii The Watchers Sleep And since drinking they welcomed him kindly, he gave to them also another of the wine-skins. And indulging in the drinking a lot the guards became extremely drunk, and moreover overcome by sleep they fell into slumber right there, where they were drinking.

Then he, with night now having come, not only released the body of his brother, but also by way of insult shaved the right cheeks of all the guards.

And in this way then having placed the corpse onto the donkeys he drove off homeward, having carried out the things ordered by his mother .

1.8 the King's Second Ruse: A Kiss for a Secret Now the king, when he heard the body of the thief to have escaped notice having been stolen away, was very upset. [lit. made for himself terrible]

And totally wishing to know who on earth might be he having devised these things is said to have done also these things, to me not believable. He is said also to have set down in the chamber the daughter the of himself, (she happened being very beautiful ) having instructed to welcome all men alike, and if anyone were to wish to kiss her with his mouth, to promise: " Certainly to be about to kiss him, if he should tell to her what thing in his life he has done the cleverest and the most shocking. And whoever should describe the things having taken place regarding the thief, to arrest this man and not to let him go outside.

1.9 the Second Counter Ruse – i. the Dead hand

And the daughter was doing the things ordered by her father. The thief (for he realised I suppose the the sake of what these are being done) wished even so to get ahead of the king in cunning tricks.

Having cut off therefore the hand of some recently killed dead man he went having this hidden under his cloak.

And in this way going in to the daughter of the king he was asked the same things what things also the others .

And he described, how he was having done the most shocking thing, when he cut off the head of his brother captured by the trap in the treasure-house of the king; while the cleverest, when having made drunk the guards, he escaped notice having released the hanging corpse of his brother.

1.10 Wit Wins the Day

And she when she heard, was grabbing of him, but the thief stretched out to her the hand of the dead man.

And she, on account of her eagerness not seeing clearly, having seized held tight of [=to] it. For she thought to be holding tight of the hand of him himself. And so the thief having put out to her this hand he went off escaping through the doors.

1.11 the Reward of Merit

And when these things were reported back to the king at first he was astonished by the cleverness and by the daring of the man.

And in the end, having sent out to all the cities, he announced that not so that the thief should pay the penalty if he were to come into the sight of himself but even he would gain great things.

Having heard then these the thief trusted and came to him.

And Rhampsinitos was impressed and joined in marriage to him that daughter as knowing the most of men. For. he said, " the Egyptians to have excelled other men in wisdom, but him the Egyptians."