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English Conversations with Cliff LMA004, LJILJANA w CLIFF #4.1

LJILJANA w CLIFF #4.1

Today we had to talk about work life balance, and time management, and scheduling. One of the first things that you told me was that work-life balance was something of a difficult needle for you to thread because everything is mixed together. There isn't that clean line of demarcation between work and personal life for you. Work comes home. You will often times take work files home with you to have it available on hand just in case you wind up doing some work at home, even though a lot of times you don't. But the fact that it's there makes it feel like there isn't that clean separation between work hours and personal time hours. Similarly, up until just a few months ago, your day would start with grabbing the phone and checking work email while you're getting ready to go to work. But what you came to realize was that you were going to be at your job in just an hour or so, and while you were home even though you could read the email, and maybe feel badly about it if it was one of those kinds of messages, there wasn't anything that you could do about it. So you decided since you couldn't do anything about it to not read them and the mornings have been much better since then and you can deal with email when you're actually in the office and able to address whatever issue it brings up. We actually talked a lot about how the phone can keep you tethered to something and makes it difficult to to let go, and that sometimes you wish to take some time away on an island somewhere by yourself. No people, no technology, and just disconnect from the world and truly relax. In the meantime, working on time management skills is something that that you think might help make you feel a bit more productive and in a weird way more relaxed. I talked about how I had set up my own schedule and that the busier it was, the easier things felt for me. That doing one thing after another and having it actually scheduled and have time carved out for each thing made me feel better about the end of the day, because if I didn't have that time allocated on a calendar, it would just drift away without actually being used. And at the end of the day all I would do is look back and see that I hadn't accomplished anything and not even really done anything particularly relaxing and I didn't feel any better at the end of the day than I did at the beginning. But if I had a properly scheduled day complete with all kinds of things on my to-do list, when I would go to bed that night I could look back I could see that I had done all of those things. I did the things that I wanted to do, even if it was a little bit of work and I felt better at the end of the day having done it.



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LJILJANA w CLIFF #4.1

Today we had to talk about work life balance, and time management, and scheduling. One of the first things that you told me was that work-life balance was something of a difficult needle for you to thread because everything is mixed together. There isn't that clean line of demarcation between work and personal life for you. Work comes home. You will often times take work files home with you to have it available on hand just in case you wind up doing some work at home, even though a lot of times you don't. But the fact that it's there makes it feel like there isn't that clean separation between work hours and personal time hours. Similarly, up until just a few months ago, your day would start with grabbing the phone and checking work email while you're getting ready to go to work. But what you came to realize was that you were going to be at your job in just an hour or so, and while you were home even though you could read the email, and maybe feel badly about it if it was one of those kinds of messages, there wasn't anything that you could do about it. So you decided since you couldn't do anything about it to not read them and the mornings have been much better since then and you can deal with email when you're actually in the office and able to address whatever issue it brings up. We actually talked a lot about how the phone can keep you tethered to something and makes it difficult to to let go, and that sometimes you wish to take some time away on an island somewhere by yourself. No people, no technology, and just disconnect from the world and truly relax. In the meantime, working on time management skills is something that that you think might help make you feel a bit more productive and in a weird way more relaxed. I talked about how I had set up my own schedule and that the busier it was, the easier things felt for me. That doing one thing after another and having it actually scheduled and have time carved out for each thing made me feel better about the end of the day, because if I didn't have that time allocated on a calendar, it would just drift away without actually being used. And at the end of the day all I would do is look back and see that I hadn't accomplished anything and not even really done anything particularly relaxing and I didn't feel any better at the end of the day than I did at the beginning. But if I had a properly scheduled day complete with all kinds of things on my to-do list, when I would go to bed that night I could look back I could see that I had done all of those things. I did the things that I wanted to do, even if it was a little bit of work and I felt better at the end of the day having done it.

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