image

English Conversations with Cliff LMA004, ALENKA w CLIFF #9.1

ALENKA w CLIFF #9.1

Our first topic today was how we had exhausted the pool of topics that had been selected for this month's game. You and I had run through all of them already and we still have a couple of sessions left. That's what we get for being so efficient I guess. So we talked a bit about learning languages and the struggles that you and I have both had, because I was really struck by some of the things that you said in your practice presentation last week. When I saw it on recording, you had talked about how your success with learning languages more recently had caused you to re-evaluate how you felt and thought about yourself. Yreviously your difficulty in learning English had you thinking that you were kind of dumb and that this was something you couldn't do. That sounded very familiar to me, so I told you a bit about my experience learning languages, or not learning them really. I told you about how I had taken French in primary education and not learned a thing. I had also taken Spanish in high school and not learned a thing. I had studied Hebrew in religious school and learned a grand total of 5 words and one phrase. And then I took German in college for three semesters and learned that I couldn't speak German. While I was there I studied, which is something that I never did. I never studied for any of my classes. I had a tutor, and eventually I took a test that told me I had a learning disability and that I was never really going to learn a foreign language. And I walked around with that belief for twenty years. So I was very happy for you when I heard that you had this revelation that yes, you can indeed learn English. And then we talked a little bit about your upcoming presentation and what you're going to talk about. And you said that you plan on talking about leadership and your experiences in life that deal with leadership, that leadership has to do with inspiring people. And you have discovered that this is something that you can do, that you have abilities that allow you to inspire people around you in your life. You also told me about last Friday, which was a bit of a crazy time for you. You drove Matej to the airport for his trip to Portugal and that trip started at 11 p.m., so you were on the road late at night and got home even later. We talked a little bit about traveling because you had told me early in our time together that one of the reasons you are studying English is so that you could better talk to people in your travels. I also knew that you had already been to Italy before because you told me a story about how you were in a square during a storm and there was a press of a crowd around you, but when you screamed, they gave you space because you have powerful lungs. So you told me that you had been to Italy twice, three days each time, and that you had been to a few different cities, but that you would like to go back and see one particular place. You couldn't remember the name of it, but it's five small towns by the sea. You can travel by train or walk while you're there. You'd like to go there. Beyond that, you're interested mostly in nature, less man-made, less touristy locations. Though you did say that you were interested in the pyramids, first in Egypt, but then you realized there are some pyramids in Bosnia, which is definitely closer. And I mentioned that if you're interested in that kind of structure from ancient cultures, Mexico has a few different places with ziggurats that are also available, although that is definitely more of a trip. I asked you if you ever thought about coming to America and you said for yourself, no, but when your daughter was younger she wanted to come to New York City, because of course she wants to come to New York City. Because everybody who comes to America wants to see New York City. I used to live in New York City. I worked there. I worked in Manhattan, which is usually what people think of when they think of New York City. It's the most famous burrow within New York City and it has the most tourist attractions. That's where the Statue of Liberty is. That's where the Empire State Building is. That's where the Twin Towers were. So it's the most well-known. I'm glad not to live there anymore. it's very busy. it's very expensive. I do go back there every so often in order to visit my father, and I told you about the story when I was driving home from visiting my father and I took a wrong turn and wound up in Manhattan in a car. It took me almost three hours to drive less than ten kilometers. It actually took me less time to drive from from New Jersey, which is the state right next door New York City, Jersey to Pennsylvania, where I live, is about ninety miles, call It maybe one hundred and fifty kilometers I guess, I'm not really sure. That took me an hour and a half. It took me three hours to drive less than ten kilometers through Manhattan because the traffic was so awful.



Want to learn a language?


Learn from this text and thousands like it on LingQ.

  • A vast library of audio lessons, all with matching text
  • Revolutionary learning tools
  • A global, interactive learning community.

Language learning online @ LingQ

ALENKA w CLIFF #9.1 АЛЕНКА w КЛІФ №9.1

Our first topic today was how we had exhausted the pool of topics that had been selected for this month's game. You and I had run through all of them already and we still have a couple of sessions left. That's what we get for being so efficient I guess. So we talked a bit about learning languages and the struggles that you and I have both had, because I was really struck by some of the things that you said in your practice presentation last week. When I saw it on recording, you had talked about how your success with learning languages more recently had caused you to re-evaluate how you felt and thought about yourself. Yreviously your difficulty in learning English had you thinking that you were kind of dumb and that this was something you couldn't do. That sounded very familiar to me, so I told you a bit about my experience learning languages, or not learning them really. I told you about how I had taken French in primary education and not learned a thing. I had also taken Spanish in high school and not learned a thing. I had studied Hebrew in religious school and learned a grand total of 5 words and one phrase. And then I took German in college for three semesters and learned that I couldn't speak German. While I was there I studied, which is something that I never did. I never studied for any of my classes. I had a tutor, and eventually I took a test that told me I had a learning disability and that I was never really going to learn a foreign language. And I walked around with that belief for twenty years. So I was very happy for you when I heard that you had this revelation that yes, you can indeed learn English. And then we talked a little bit about your upcoming presentation and what you're going to talk about. And you said that you plan on talking about leadership and your experiences in life that deal with leadership, that leadership has to do with inspiring people. And you have discovered that this is something that you can do, that you have abilities that allow you to inspire people around you in your life. You also told me about last Friday, which was a bit of a crazy time for you. You drove Matej to the airport for his trip to Portugal and that trip started at 11 p.m., so you were on the road late at night and got home even later. We talked a little bit about traveling because you had told me early in our time together that one of the reasons you are studying English is so that you could better talk to people in your travels. I also knew that you had already been to Italy before because you told me a story about how you were in a square during a storm and there was a press of a crowd around you, but when you screamed, they gave you space because you have powerful lungs. So you told me that you had been to Italy twice, three days each time, and that you had been to a few different cities, but that you would like to go back and see one particular place. You couldn't remember the name of it, but it's five small towns by the sea. You can travel by train or walk while you're there. You'd like to go there. Beyond that, you're interested mostly in nature, less man-made, less touristy locations. Though you did say that you were interested in the pyramids, first in Egypt, but then you realized there are some pyramids in Bosnia, which is definitely closer. And I mentioned that if you're interested in that kind of structure from ancient cultures, Mexico has a few different places with ziggurats that are also available, although that is definitely more of a trip. I asked you if you ever thought about coming to America and you said for yourself, no, but when your daughter was younger she wanted to come to New York City, because of course she wants to come to New York City. Because everybody who comes to America wants to see New York City. I used to live in New York City. I worked there. I worked in Manhattan,  which is usually what people think of when they think of  New York City. It's the most famous burrow within New York City and it has the most tourist attractions. That's where the Statue of Liberty is. That's where the Empire State Building is. That's where the Twin Towers were. So it's the most well-known. I'm glad not to live there anymore. it's very busy. it's very expensive. I do go back there every so often in order to visit my father, and I told you about the story when I was driving home from visiting my father and I took a wrong turn and wound up in Manhattan in a car. It took me almost three hours to drive less than ten kilometers. It actually took me less time to drive from from New Jersey, which is the state right next door New York City, Jersey to Pennsylvania, where I live, is about ninety miles, call It maybe one hundred and fifty kilometers I guess, I'm not really sure. That took me an hour and a half. It took me three hours to drive less than ten kilometers through Manhattan because the traffic was so awful.

×

We use cookies to help make LingQ better. By visiting the site, you agree to our cookie policy.