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English Conversations with Cliff LMA004, BARBARA w CLIFF #11.1

BARBARA w CLIFF #11.1

Today we started off with a practice run of your presentation for Friday. And we got right to it. We got on the call, we said our greetings, I pulled up my timer, said “three, two, one, go!” and you went. You spoke for ten minutes and you spoke for the entire ten minutes. There was no dead air. There was no fumbling around. You picked it up and you ran with it. There was one moment, I think with around two minutes and forty seconds left or so, where there was a pregnant pause for about a fraction of a second, and I could tell that the well was starting to run dry. But then you got a second wind and you kept on going and that was it. There was no pause after that. You said that you felt like you were fumbling around a little bit, but you hid it really well. I thought we were going to spend most of the session going over it, refining it, helping you get more comfortable with it, but there was really not very much that I could tell you at all because you had it all well in hand. The only suggestion I had for you was to speak more slowly than you thought you'd be comfortable with because when you're on the clock you tend to speak faster. That's true of everybody. So if you were starting to run low on material with just a few minutes left, by speaking more slowly you'll have a better chance of still having that well of material full, or at least say half full, when that buzzer rings. And then we were talking about expressions in English and getting familiar with the colloquialisms of it and not just the list of single words. We talked a bit about reading and just general exposure to the language as a way to increase that familiarity. You told me that you read The Economist pretty regularly because of its content, but also because the writing is professional and accomplished, which I would agree with. I don't know how many idioms you're going to run into in a in a publication like The Economist because it is so formal, but then again I'm not aware of when idioms get used all that often because they don't stand out to me; they're just part of the language. We talked a bit about how you could perhaps read more tabloid type of publications in order to get exposure to more common language, but you don't really want to do that because they're trash. I agreed, and I told you that in America, we often refer to them as rags because that's what they're worth.



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BARBARA w CLIFF #11.1

Today we started off with a practice run of your presentation for Friday. And we got right to it. We got on the call, we said our greetings, I pulled up my timer, said “three, two, one, go!” and you went. You spoke for ten minutes and you spoke for the entire ten minutes. There was no dead air. There was no fumbling around. You picked it up and you ran with it. There was one moment, I think with around two minutes and forty seconds left or so, where there was a pregnant pause for about a fraction of a second, and I could tell that the well was starting to run dry. But then you got a second wind and you kept on going and that was it. There was no pause after that. You said that you felt like you were fumbling around a little bit, but you hid it really well. I thought we were going to spend most of the session going over it, refining it, helping you get more comfortable with it, but there was really not very much that I could tell you at all because you had it all well in hand. The only suggestion I had for you was to speak more slowly than you thought you'd be comfortable with because when you're on the clock you tend to speak faster. That's true of everybody. So if you were starting to run low on material with just a few minutes left, by speaking more slowly you'll have a better chance of still having that well of material full, or at least say half full, when that buzzer rings. And then we were talking about expressions in English and getting familiar with the colloquialisms of it and not just the list of single words. We talked a bit about reading and just general exposure to the language as a way to increase that familiarity. You told me that you read The Economist pretty regularly because of its content, but also because the writing is professional and accomplished, which I would agree with. I don't know how many idioms you're going to run into in a in a publication like The Economist because it is so formal, but then again I'm not aware of when idioms get used all that often because they don't stand out to me; they're just part of the language. We talked a bit about how you could perhaps read more tabloid type of publications in order to get exposure to more common language, but you don't really want to do that because they're trash. I agreed, and I told you that in America, we often refer to them as rags because that's what they're worth.

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