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English LingQ 2.0 Podcast, EnglishLingQ 2.0 Podcast #3: Mark Kaufmann Talks About His Hockey Career (1)

EnglishLingQ 2.0 Podcast #3: Mark Kaufmann Talks About His Hockey Career (1)

Elizabeth: Hello everyone. And welcome to the LingQ English podcast, episode three with me, Jahrine.

And today I'm joined by LingQ co-founder AKA the boss, Mark Kaufman.How are you Mark?

Mark: I'm good. Thanks. I like that. The boss.

Elizabeth: Yeah, the boss. So, I thought it would be interesting to chat with you about your hockey career. It's not something I know a lot about actually, and I'd be interested to find out. So, um, yeah. You, you had a hockey career before LingQ.

Um, can you tell us about it? When did you start playing hockey?

Mark: Um, I mean, I, uh, played hockey most of my life, I guess. I think I probably started skating... I don't, I dunno when I was like four. Um, and then, uh, I. I was actually, I grew up in Japan, at least till age six and then moved back to Vancouver to start grade one.

And I remember my brother and I being at school and other kids were playing hockey. Uh, and we came home and said, we want to play hockey. And from that time on, I pretty much have always played hockey. So organized hockey at age six, although I was skating probably earlier than that.

Elizabeth: Right. I guess it's pretty Canadian.

thing to do generally... for kids.

Mark: Yeah, I

would say so. I mean, uh, yeah, every everybody played, you know, at least in, in elementary school and as time goes on, um, uh, you know, like it, like with anything people drop off and, um, people get into other things. Um, but, uh, yeah, I, uh, always played here and then ended up going to play college hockey in the States and, uh, Yeah.

Went on from there, played in many different places over the course of 10 years. So, and still play today with my friends.

Elizabeth: Oh you do still play today? Nice Excellent.

Mark: Well, not right now, cause we're not allowed to, but, uh, up until recently anyway.

Elizabeth: How long have you, how long was the, I guess around maybe March, April, you weren't allowed.

And did it go on for months? The ban ban on hockey?

Mark: Yeah, March, April. We, we, we we did start playing, um, Yeah, I can, I don't remember exactly when we started, but we were able to start uh at least in September, and there were some interruption that, you know, the odd time, you know, for whatever reason, few weeks there wasn't any, and then up until a week or so ago when it kind of got all indoor sort of sports activities kinda got, um,

Banned. Yeah.

Which, yeah, I guess it's yeah. It's obviously it's understandable trying to get, uh, a virus at least to not keep increasing. Yeah.

Elizabeth: Is it, uh, are you going stir-crazy without hockey now or is it a nice break?

Mark: It's kind of nice to be able to play, to be honest, that the best thing about it...

it's it's almost more than anything else when you're playing hockey, you really can't think about anything else. So you're just sort of focused on what you're doing. Cause it's, you're out there and it's just, it happens very fast. And uh, so that's kinda nice and it's great exercise and you see all your friends and yeah, it's kind of hard now.

You don't really get to see people, although I'm still trying to play golf. At least that's something we can do even as the weather is less good, but, uh, there's still lots of, lots of golf, more than normal for, for people that like golf, um, because it's something that's possible to do now during COVID.

How about you?

Elizabeth: Do I play golf?

Mark: I know you're not a big golfer, but, uh, just in terms of, uh, seeing people and, you know, the kinds of things that you would otherwise have been doing and now, you know, most things are kind of on hold in terms of seeing people. Yeah.

Elizabeth: Yeah. I mean, thank goodness for the internet and, um, Zoom, but, uh, yeah.

Not doing a lot, the grocery store once a week. That's lots of fun. Yeah.

But it's, it's, you know, I guess you got to make the best of it. I've been doing a lot of home renovation type things, so that's good. That's fun.

Mark: You're not

the only one. So, so have we, and, and I think that's a global phenomenon. Um, you know, our related company sells

lumber. And, uh, that's been a very good thing to be in during this, uh, time because overall construction really hasn't stopped at least in North America. And the do it yourself market has just exploded. So a lot of demand for forest products right now.

Elizabeth: I'm going to Ikea tomorrow morning. And apparently it's the average is like a one hour lineup outside the store.

Everyone is just, yeah.

Mark: Yeah, that doesn't surprise me. That should be fun for sure. Maybe you could have done it on a Sunday. Yeah.

Two hours.

Elizabeth: Yeah, that's it. It's I think it's busier on the... I guess it's busier on the weekends, but we'll see. But, but back to hockey, um, I always wondered about the whole fighting aspect of hockey.

I admittedly, I don't watch hockey, but is it it's so it's expected part of it, is it like pantomime? You know, you get into a fight, but it's not really a fight or do you fight when playing hockey?

Mark: Uh, yeah, I guess, um, when you're involved in it, you understand it, but I guess as someone who doesn't.

Infrequent observer. You're probably wondering, uh, it's not really like a, you mean, is it like a WWF?

Elizabeth: Is it all for show, you know, is it like you players know that the audience kind of, likes to see a little fight throughout and...

Mark: For starters, those guys

are hitting each other. They're not they're they're uh, it's not fake.

It's not fake guys, guys do get hurt, but, um, originally it was there sort of, you know, as a... guys get mad and get in a fight and, and, um, Uh, that's why it's always been allowed and... it's a lot, like if you get a five minute penalty and then you're allowed to play again, you only get, you get kicked out of the game

if you get in three fights.

Elizabeth: Okay.

Mark: Pretty strict. But, uh, kind of over time, what's ended up happening is that, um, And it's it's changing now, but there used to be, every team kind of had a goon or a...

Elizabeth: Right

Mark: ...thug that sits at the end of the bench and doesn't play much. And they're theoretically, so that the other team doesn't, you know, take liberties with your better players.

If they do, then you, he, that guy's gonna jump on the ice and beat somebody up. Um,

Elizabeth: okay

Mark: um, what ends up happening then is after a while to liven things up almost or to, to change the momentum because momentum is a huge factor in any sport. Uh, one, one team will put their thug on the ice and he'll go challenge the other team's guy to have a fight which ends up really. It's just kind of a staged fight.

They are hitting each other. But that's what they're there to do.

Right,

Elizabeth: but it's

Organized.

Mark: It's kind of organized. It's not really in the game. It's not in the heat of the game. It's not because something happened on the ice and they were mad about it. Um, so that, that kinda ended up happening. It still happens a bit, but, uh, there's kind of a bit of both now, so that now sometimes it's a genuinely that they're mad at each other and sometimes it's kind of

uh, staged and, and those guys, if they're not fighting, then they don't really have a job. So,

yeah.

And the fans like it. And so it's kinda, there's any number of reasons why. It is a bit strange. That seems like it's the only game where you're actually allowed to fight each other still. I don't know if that, if it used to be part of more games in the past, but, uh, seems like, um, And that's a bit of a Canadian thing.

They don't really do it elsewhere when they play hockey.

Elizabeth: Yeah. I didn't know that. So not in the States even?

Mark: Yeah. Uh, not when they're not really not when they're kids, I think w the NHL, because it has, has been dominated by Canadians, uh, for used to be all the players were Canadian now it's, it's much less, it's more of a global game, but the culture is kind of set, uh, by Canadians.

And that's kind of why it's always had fighting, but they're all other leagues don't allow fighting.

Elizabeth: Okay.

Mark: All other countries. And, uh, yeah.

Elizabeth: So you didn't, there was no fighting when you, because you played hockey in Japan, you played hockey in Switzerland, Austria, Switzerland.

Mark: Uh, I played in both, Switzerland and Austria and Italy and Japan.

Um, And, uh, yeah, in those leagues, if you fight it, there's the odd fight, like in any, I think any sport has the odd fight, but if you fight in those leagues, you get kicked out.

Elizabeth: Wow.

Mark: Of the game at least. Yeah.

Uh, whereas, uh, here in, in junior hockey here and in pro hockey here, you don't get kicked out. So that's, that's the biggest difference.

So there's just more of it. Um, yeah. And it's more. It, it it's just been more of the culture here was a more of a aggressive style of play, I guess, in Canada and the rest of the world, they just tended to be more skill kind of play. And, but I would say, you know, with more and more, especially, uh, European and American for that matter players, the NHL, uh, it's, it's more and more of a skilled game.

I mean, it has to be. Uh, so there's less and less fighting. Um, and it's just very fast now and very skilled, uh, quite a bit different than when I played. Although I was not, I,

Elizabeth: I was going to ask you, you weren't the goon?

Mark: No, I was not the goon. I wouldn't have got very far at my size playing that way. So, no, I was, uh, I was actually a skilled player, score type of guy.

Yeah.

Not, not a fighter. No, not me.

Elizabeth: Okay.

Okay.

Is it like a derogatory term? Is the, or is the goon... the goon in a team knows he's the goon and it's like a... proud thing or is it like they're made fun off because they're not very skilled, but they're crazy. And they fight.

Mark: Yeah. A little of everything. Yeah.

Yeah.

They, uh, everybody knows what they're there for. They know everyone else knows and, but everybody respects what they do. Like it's not an easy thing to do. They're genuinely going out there and fighting the toughest guy in the other team.

Elizabeth: It's a skill. It's just another skill.

Mark: It's just another skill.

Yeah.

And then in theory, then they're there to have your back, like, because it is a fast game and there's a lot of, um, opportunity to, you know, try and intimidate and hurt other guys and hit them. And so it is nice to have a guy that's gonna push back. And so, yeah, just the culture. It's, it's nobody looks down on those guys.


EnglishLingQ 2.0 Podcast #3: Mark Kaufmann Talks About His Hockey Career (1) EnglishLingQ 2.0 Podcast #3: Mark Kaufmann Talks About His Hockey Career (1)

Elizabeth: Hello everyone. And welcome to the LingQ English podcast, episode three with me, Jahrine.

And today I'm joined by LingQ co-founder AKA the boss, Mark Kaufman.How are you Mark?

Mark: I'm good. Thanks. I like that. The boss.

Elizabeth: Yeah, the boss. So, I thought it would be interesting to chat with you about your hockey career. It's not something I know a lot about actually, and I'd be interested to find out. این چیزی نیست که من در مورد آن چیزهای زیادی بدانم و من علاقه مندم که آن را کشف کنم. Não é algo que eu saiba muito na verdade, e eu estaria interessado em descobrir. So, um, yeah. You, you had a hockey career before LingQ.

Um, can you tell us about it? When did you start playing hockey?

Mark: Um, I mean, I, uh, played hockey most of my life, I guess. I think I probably started skating... I don't, I dunno when I was like four. Acho que provavelmente comecei a patinar ... Não sei, não sei quando tinha uns quatro anos. Um, and then, uh, I. I was actually, I grew up in Japan, at least till age six and then moved back to Vancouver to start grade one. Hum, e então, uh, eu. Na verdade, eu cresci no Japão, pelo menos até os seis anos de idade e depois me mudei de volta para Vancouver para começar a primeira série.

And I remember my brother and I being at school and other kids were playing hockey. Uh, and we came home and said, we want to play hockey. And from that time on, I pretty much have always played hockey. E desde então, praticamente sempre joguei hóquei. So organized hockey at age six, although I was skating probably earlier than that. Tão organizado o hóquei aos seis anos, embora provavelmente tenha patinado antes disso.

Elizabeth: Right. I guess it's pretty Canadian. Eu acho que é bem canadense.

thing to do generally... for kids.

Mark: Yeah, I

would say so. diria isso. I mean, uh, yeah, every everybody played, you know, at least in, in elementary school and as time goes on, um, uh, you know, like it, like with anything people drop off and, um, people get into other things. Quero dizer, uh, sim, todo mundo jogou, você sabe, pelo menos no, na escola primária e conforme o tempo passa, um, uh, você sabe, gosto, como com qualquer coisa que as pessoas caem e, hum, as pessoas entram outras coisas. Um, but, uh, yeah, I, uh, always played here and then ended up going to play college hockey in the States and, uh, Yeah. Hum, mas, uh, sim, eu, uh, sempre joguei aqui e depois acabei indo jogar hóquei na faculdade nos Estados Unidos e, uh, sim.

Went on from there, played in many different places over the course of 10 years. A partir daí, tocou em diversos lugares ao longo de 10 anos. So, and still play today with my friends.

Elizabeth: Oh you do still play today? Elizabeth: Oh, você ainda joga hoje? Nice Excellent. Bom, excelente.

Mark: Well, not right now, cause we're not allowed to, but, uh, up until recently anyway. Mark: Bem, não agora, porque não temos permissão, mas, uh, até recentemente de qualquer maneira.

Elizabeth: How long have you, how long was the, I guess around maybe March, April, you weren't allowed. Elizabeth: ¿Cuánto tiempo tienes, cuánto tiempo fue, supongo que alrededor de marzo, abril, no se te permitió? Elizabeth: Há quanto tempo você, há quanto tempo, acho que por volta de março, abril, você não era permitido.

And did it go on for months? ¿Y continuó durante meses? E isso durou meses? The ban ban on hockey? ¿La prohibición de la prohibición del hockey? A proibição do hóquei?

Mark: Yeah, March, April. We, we, we we did start playing, um, Yeah, I can, I don't remember exactly when we started, but we were able to start uh at least in September, and there were some interruption that, you know, the odd time, you know, for whatever reason, few weeks there wasn't any, and then up until a week or so ago when it kind of got all indoor sort of sports activities kinda got, um, Nós, nós, começamos a jogar, hum, sim, posso, não me lembro exatamente quando começamos, mas conseguimos começar, hã, pelo menos em setembro, e houve algumas interrupções que, você sabe, o tempo estranho, você sabe, por qualquer motivo, algumas semanas não houve nenhum, e então até uma semana ou mais atrás, quando meio que teve todo tipo de atividades esportivas internas meio que, hum,

Banned. Banido. Yeah.

Which, yeah, I guess it's yeah. Que, sim, acho que sim. It's obviously it's understandable trying to get, uh, a virus at least to not keep increasing. Obviamente, é compreensível tentar pegar, uh, um vírus pelo menos para não continuar aumentando. Yeah.

Elizabeth: Is it, uh, are you going stir-crazy without hockey now or is it a nice break? Elizabeth: É, uh, você está ficando louco sem hóquei agora ou é uma boa pausa?

Mark: It's kind of nice to be able to play, to be honest, that the best thing about it... Mark: É bom poder tocar, para ser honesto, que a melhor coisa sobre isso ...

it's it's almost more than anything else when you're playing hockey, you really can't think about anything else. é quase mais do que qualquer outra coisa quando você está jogando hóquei, você realmente não consegue pensar em mais nada. So you're just sort of focused on what you're doing. Então você está meio que focado no que está fazendo. Cause it's, you're out there and it's just, it happens very fast. Porque é, você está lá e isso acontece muito rápido. And uh, so that's kinda nice and it's great exercise and you see all your friends and yeah, it's kind of hard now. E uh, isso é bem legal e é um ótimo exercício e você vê todos os seus amigos e sim, é meio difícil agora.

You don't really get to see people, although I'm still trying to play golf. Você realmente não consegue ver as pessoas, embora eu ainda esteja tentando jogar golfe. At least that's something we can do even as the weather is less good, but, uh, there's still lots of, lots of golf, more than normal for, for people that like golf, um, because it's something that's possible to do now during COVID. Pelo menos isso é algo que podemos fazer mesmo que o tempo esteja bom, mas ainda há muito, muito golfe, mais do que o normal para, para pessoas que gostam de golfe, hum, porque é algo que é possível fazer agora durante COVID.

How about you?

Elizabeth: Do I play golf? Elizabeth: Eu jogo golfe?

Mark: I know you're not a big golfer, but, uh, just in terms of, uh, seeing people and, you know, the kinds of things that you would otherwise have been doing and now, you know, most things are kind of on hold in terms of seeing people. Mark: Wiem, że nie jesteś wielkim golfistą, ale, uh, tylko pod względem, uh, widywania ludzi i, wiesz, rodzajów rzeczy, które inaczej byś robił, a teraz wiesz, większość rzeczy jest trochę wstrzymywane, jeśli chodzi o widywanie ludzi. Mark: Eu sei que você não é um grande jogador de golfe, mas, uh, apenas em termos de, uh, ver as pessoas e, você sabe, os tipos de coisas que você faria de outra forma e agora, você sabe, a maioria das coisas são meio que em espera em termos de ver as pessoas. 马克:我知道你不是一个大高尔夫球手,但是,呃,就,呃,见人,你知道,那些你本来会做的事情,现在,你知道,大多数事情都是在见人方面有点搁置。 Yeah.

Elizabeth: Yeah. I mean, thank goodness for the internet and, um, Zoom, but, uh, yeah. Digo, graças a Deus pela internet e, hum, Zoom, mas, uh, sim.

Not doing a lot, the grocery store once a week. Não fazendo muito, no supermercado uma vez por semana. That's lots of fun. Isso é muito divertido. Yeah.

But it's, it's, you know, I guess you got to make the best of it. Ale to jest, wiesz, myślę, że musisz to jak najlepiej wykorzystać. Mas é, é, você sabe, acho que você tem que tirar o melhor proveito disso. I've been doing a lot of home renovation type things, so that's good. Tenho feito muitas coisas do tipo reforma de casa, então isso é bom. That's fun.

Mark: You're not

the only one. o único. So, so have we, and, and I think that's a global phenomenon. Então, nós também, e acho que é um fenômeno global. Um, you know, our related company sells Um, you know, our related company sells Um, wiesz, nasza powiązana firma sprzedaje Hum, você sabe, nossa empresa relacionada vende

lumber. madeira. And, uh, that's been a very good thing to be in during this, uh, time because overall construction really hasn't stopped at least in North America. そして、ええと、それはこの時期に参加するのに非常に良いことでした。ええと、少なくとも北米では全体的な建設が実際に止まっていないからです。 E, uh, isso tem sido uma coisa muito boa durante este, uh, tempo porque a construção geral realmente não parou, pelo menos na América do Norte. 而且,呃,在这段时间里,这是一件非常好的事情,因为至少在北美,整体建设确实没有停止。 And the do it yourself market has just exploded. そして、自分でやる市場は爆発的に拡大しました。 E o mercado do faça você mesmo explodiu. 自己动手的市场刚刚爆发。 So a lot of demand for forest products right now. Portanto, há muita demanda por produtos florestais agora. 所以现在对林产品的需求很大。

Elizabeth: I'm going to Ikea tomorrow morning. Elizabeth: Vou para a Ikea amanhã de manhã. And apparently it's the average is like a one hour lineup outside the store. I najwyraźniej to średnia jest jak godzinny skład poza sklepem. E, aparentemente, a média é uma fila de uma hora fora da loja. 显然,平均情况就像在商店外排队一小时。

Everyone is just, yeah. Todo mundo está apenas, sim.

Mark: Yeah, that doesn't surprise me. Mark: Sim, isso não me surpreende. That should be fun for sure. Isso deve ser divertido com certeza. Maybe you could have done it on a Sunday. Talvez você pudesse ter feito isso em um domingo. 也许你可以在星期天完成。 Yeah.

Two hours.

Elizabeth: Yeah, that's it. It's I think it's busier on the... I guess it's busier on the weekends, but we'll see. Acho que é mais movimentado no ... Acho que é mais movimentado nos fins de semana, mas veremos. 我认为它在...上更忙……我想它在周末更忙,但我们拭目以待。 But, but back to hockey, um, I always wondered about the whole fighting aspect of hockey. Mas, voltando ao hóquei, sempre me perguntei sobre todo o aspecto de luta do hóquei. 但是,回到曲棍球,嗯,我一直想知道曲棍球的整个战斗方面。

I admittedly, I don't watch hockey, but is it it's so it's expected part of it, is it like pantomime? Eu admito, não assisto hóquei, mas é assim que se espera, é como pantomima? 我承认,我不看曲棍球,但它是预期的一部分吗,它像哑剧吗? You know, you get into a fight, but it's not really a fight or do you fight when playing hockey? Você sabe, você entra em uma luta, mas não é realmente uma luta ou você luta quando joga hóquei? 您知道,您会打架,但这并不是真正的打架,或者您在打曲棍球时是否打架?

Mark: Uh, yeah, I guess, um, when you're involved in it, you understand it, but I guess as someone who doesn't. Mark: Uh, sim, eu acho, hum, quando você está envolvido nisso, você entende, mas eu acho que como alguém que não entende. 马克:嗯,是的,我想,嗯,当你参与其中时,你会理解它,但我想作为一个不理解的人。

Infrequent observer. Observador infrequente. 不常观察者。 You're probably wondering, uh, it's not really like a, you mean, is it like a WWF? Você provavelmente está se perguntando, uh, não é realmente como um, quer dizer, é como um WWF? 你可能想知道,呃,它不像一个,你的意思是,它像一个世界自然基金会吗?

Elizabeth: Is it all for show, you know, is it like you players know that the audience kind of, likes to see a little fight throughout and... Elizabeth: É tudo para mostrar, sabe, é como se vocês, jogadores, soubessem que o público gosta de ver uma pequena briga e ... 伊丽莎白:这一切都是为了表演吗,你知道吗,是不是就像你们玩家知道观众喜欢在整个过程中看到一场小打斗一样……

Mark: For starters, those guys Mark: Para começar, esses caras 马克:首先,那些家伙

are hitting each other. estão batendo um no outro. 正在互相撞击。 They're not they're they're uh, it's not fake. Eles não são, eles são, não é falso. 他们不是他们是他们,呃,这不是假的。

It's not fake guys, guys do get hurt, but, um, originally it was there sort of, you know, as a... guys get mad and get in a fight and, and, um, Uh, that's why it's always been allowed and... it's a lot, like if you get a five minute penalty and then you're allowed to play again, you only get, you get kicked out of the game To nie są fałszywi faceci, faceci są ranni, ale, hm, pierwotnie tam było, no wiesz, jako... faceci wpadają w szał i wdają się w bójkę i, hm, uh, dlatego zawsze tak było dozwolone i... to dużo, jak jeśli dostaniesz pięciominutową karę, a potem będziesz mógł zagrać ponownie, to tylko dostaniesz, zostaniesz wyrzucony z gry Não são caras falsos, caras se machucam, mas, originalmente, estava lá, sabe, como um ... caras ficam bravos e brigam e, e, hum, é por isso que sempre foi permitido e ... é muito, como se você pegasse uma penalidade de cinco minutos e depois pudesse jogar de novo, você só consegue, é expulso do jogo 这不是假的家伙,家伙确实受伤了,但是,嗯,最初它在那里,你知道,作为一个......家伙生气并打架,而且,嗯,呃,这就是为什么它一直是被允许并且......这很多,就像如果你被罚了五分钟然后你被允许再次比赛,你只会得到,你被踢出比赛

if you get in three fights. se você entrar em três lutas.

Elizabeth: Okay.

Mark: Pretty strict. Mark: Muito rigoroso. But, uh, kind of over time, what's ended up happening is that, um, And it's it's changing now, but there used to be, every team kind of had a goon or a... اما ، اوه ، نوعی با گذشت زمان ، اتفاقی که افتاد این بود ، هوم ، و اکنون تغییر می کند ، اما قبلاً وجود داشت ، هر تیم به نوعی یک گون یا یک ... Ale, uh, z biegiem czasu, skończyło się na tym, że to się teraz zmienia, ale kiedyś było, że każda drużyna miała jakiegoś bandytę lub... Mas, uh, meio que com o tempo, o que acabou acontecendo é que, hum, e está mudando agora, mas costumava haver, todo time meio que tinha um tonto ou um ... 但是,呃,随着时间的推移,最终发生的事情是,嗯,现在情况正在发生变化,但曾经有,每个团队都有一个傻瓜或...

Elizabeth: Right

Mark: ...thug that sits at the end of the bench and doesn't play much. Marcos: ... bandido que senta na ponta do banco e não joga muito. 马克:……坐在板凳末端,不怎么上场的暴徒。 And they're theoretically, so that the other team doesn't, you know, take liberties with your better players. そして、彼らは理論的にはそうなので、他のチームはあなたのより良いプレーヤーと自由を取りません。 I są teoretycznie po to, żeby druga drużyna, no wiesz, nie miała swobody z twoimi lepszymi zawodnikami. E eles são teoricamente, para que o outro time não tome liberdade com seus melhores jogadores. 从理论上讲,他们是这样的,所以另一支球队不会,你知道,对你更好的球员采取自由行动。

If they do, then you, he, that guy's gonna jump on the ice and beat somebody up. Jeśli tak, to ty, on, ten gość wskoczysz na lód i pobijesz kogoś. Se eles fizerem isso, então você, ele, aquele cara vai pular no gelo e bater em alguém. Um,

Elizabeth: okay

Mark: um, what ends up happening then is after a while to liven things up almost or to, to change the momentum because momentum is a huge factor in any sport. Mark: um, to co się wtedy kończy, to po jakimś czasie ożywić rzeczy prawie lub do tego, aby zmienić pęd, bo pęd jest ogromnym czynnikiem w każdym sporcie. Mark: hum, o que acaba acontecendo então é depois de um tempo para animar as coisas quase ou para mudar o momentum porque o momentum é um fator enorme em qualquer esporte. 马克:嗯,最终发生的事情是一段时间后让事情变得活跃起来,或者改变动力,因为动力在任何运动中都是一个重要因素。 Uh, one, one team will put their thug on the ice and he'll go challenge the other team's guy to have a fight which ends up really. Uh, po pierwsze, jedna drużyna postawi swojego zbira na lodzie, a on wyzwie gościa z drugiej drużyny na walkę, która naprawdę się skończy. Uh, um, um time vai colocar seu bandido no gelo e ele vai desafiar o cara do outro time para uma luta que acaba realmente. 呃,一个,一支球队会把他们的暴徒放在冰上,他会去挑战另一支球队的人,打一场真的结束了。 It's just kind of a staged fight. É apenas uma espécie de luta encenada.

They are hitting each other. But that's what they're there to do. اما این کاری است که آنها برای انجام آن انجام می دهند. Mas é para isso que eles estão lá.

Right,

Elizabeth: but it's

Organized.

Mark: It's kind of organized. Mark: É meio organizado. It's not really in the game. Não está realmente no jogo. It's not in the heat of the game. Não está no calor do jogo. It's not because something happened on the ice and they were mad about it. Não é porque algo aconteceu no gelo e eles ficaram furiosos com isso. Um, so that, that kinda ended up happening. Hum, então isso meio que acabou acontecendo. 嗯,所以,这有点结束了。 It still happens a bit, but, uh, there's kind of a bit of both now, so that now sometimes it's a genuinely that they're mad at each other and sometimes it's kind of Ainda acontece um pouco, mas, uh, há um pouco dos dois agora, então agora às vezes é genuinamente que eles estão bravos um com o outro e às vezes é meio 它仍然会发生一点,但是,呃,现在两者都有一点,所以现在有时他们真的在生对方的气,有时这有点像

uh, staged and, and those guys, if they're not fighting, then they don't really have a job. uh, encenado e, e aqueles caras, se eles não estão lutando, então eles realmente não têm um emprego. 呃,上演了,还有那些家伙,如果他们不打架,那么他们就没有真正的工作。 So,

yeah.

And the fans like it. And so it's kinda, there's any number of reasons why. It is a bit strange. That seems like it's the only game where you're actually allowed to fight each other still. 这似乎是唯一允许你仍然互相战斗的游戏。 I don't know if that, if it used to be part of more games in the past, but, uh, seems like, um, And that's a bit of a Canadian thing. Eu não sei se isso, se fazia parte de mais jogos no passado, mas, uh, parece como, um, E isso é um pouco canadense. 我不知道那是不是,如果它过去曾经是更多游戏的一部分,但是,呃,看起来,嗯,这有点像加拿大的东西。

They don't really do it elsewhere when they play hockey. Eles realmente não fazem isso em outro lugar quando jogam hóquei.

Elizabeth: Yeah. I didn't know that. So not in the States even? Então nem nos Estados Unidos?

Mark: Yeah. Uh, not when they're not really not when they're kids, I think w the NHL, because it has, has been dominated by Canadians, uh, for used to be all the players were Canadian now it's, it's much less, it's more of a global game, but the culture is kind of set, uh, by Canadians. Uh, não quando eles não são realmente quando são crianças, eu acho que a NHL, porque foi, foi dominada por canadenses, uh, antes todos os jogadores eram canadenses agora é, é muito menos, é mais um jogo global, mas a cultura é meio que definida, uh, por canadenses. 呃,当他们不是真的不是他们还是孩子的时候,我认为NHL,因为它已经,一直由加拿大人主导,呃,因为过去所有的球员都是加拿大人,现在它,更少了,这更像是一场全球性的游戏,但文化是由加拿大人设定的。

And that's kind of why it's always had fighting, but they're all other leagues don't allow fighting. E é por isso que sempre houve lutas, mas todas as outras ligas não permitem lutas.

Elizabeth: Okay.

Mark: All other countries. And, uh, yeah.

Elizabeth: So you didn't, there was no fighting when you, because you played hockey in Japan, you played hockey in Switzerland, Austria, Switzerland. Elizabeth: Então você não fez, não houve luta quando você, porque você jogou hóquei no Japão, você jogou hóquei na Suíça, Áustria, Suíça. 伊丽莎白:所以你没有,你没有打架,因为你在日本打曲棍球,你在瑞士、奥地利、瑞士打曲棍球。

Mark: Uh, I played in both, Switzerland and Austria and Italy and Japan. 马克:呃,我在瑞士、奥地利、意大利和日本都打过球。

Um, And, uh, yeah, in those leagues, if you fight it, there's the odd fight, like in any, I think any sport has the odd fight, but if you fight in those leagues, you get kicked out. Hum, e, uh, sim, nessas ligas, se você lutar, há uma luta estranha, como em qualquer, eu acho que qualquer esporte tem uma luta estranha, mas se você lutar nessas ligas, você é expulso. 嗯,而且,呃,是的,在那些联赛中,如果你打它,就会有奇怪的战斗,就像在任何运动中一样,我认为任何运动都有奇怪的战斗,但如果你在那些联赛中打架,你就会被踢出局。

Elizabeth: Wow.

Mark: Of the game at least. Mark: Do jogo, pelo menos. Yeah.

Uh, whereas, uh, here in, in junior hockey here and in pro hockey here, you don't get kicked out. Uh, enquanto, uh, aqui, no hóquei júnior aqui e no hóquei profissional aqui, você não é expulso. 呃,然而,呃,在这里,这里的初级曲棍球和这里的职业曲棍球,你不会被踢出局。 So that's, that's the biggest difference.

So there's just more of it. Portanto, há apenas mais disso. Um, yeah. And it's more. It, it it's just been more of the culture here was a more of a aggressive style of play, I guess, in Canada and the rest of the world, they just tended to be more skill kind of play. カナダやその他の国々では、彼らはよりスキル的な遊びをする傾向があったと思います。 Tem sido mais da cultura aqui, é um estilo de jogo mais agressivo, eu acho, no Canadá e no resto do mundo, eles apenas tendem a ser um tipo de jogo mais habilidoso. 它,只是这里的文化更多的是一种更具侵略性的比赛风格,我猜,在加拿大和世界其他地方,他们只是倾向于更具技巧性的比赛。 And, but I would say, you know, with more and more, especially, uh, European and American for that matter players, the NHL, uh, it's, it's more and more of a skilled game. そして、しかし、私はあなたが知っていると思います、特に、ええと、ヨーロッパとアメリカのプレーヤー、NHL、ええと、それはますます熟練したゲームです。 E, mas eu diria, você sabe, com mais e mais, especialmente, uh, jogadores europeus e americanos para esse assunto, a NHL, uh, é, é cada vez mais um jogo habilidoso. 而且,但我会说,你知道,随着越来越多的,特别是,呃,欧洲和美国的球员,NHL,呃,它越来越成为一场熟练的比赛。

I mean, it has to be. Quer dizer, tem que ser. Uh, so there's less and less fighting. Um, and it's just very fast now and very skilled, uh, quite a bit different than when I played. Hum, e é muito rápido agora e muito habilidoso, um pouco diferente de quando eu joguei. 嗯,只是现在速度很快,很熟练,呃,和我玩的时候有很大的不同。 Although I was not, I, Embora eu não fosse, eu,

Elizabeth: I was going to ask you, you weren't the goon? الیزابت: می خواستم از تو بپرسم تو گون نبودی؟ Elizabeth: Eu ia te perguntar, você não era o idiota? 伊丽莎白:我正要问你,你不是那个打手吗?

Mark: No, I was not the goon. Mark: Não, eu não era o idiota. 马克:不,我不是暴徒。 I wouldn't have got very far at my size playing that way. Grając w ten sposób, nie zaszedłbym daleko w moim rozmiarze. Eu não teria ido muito longe no meu tamanho jogando assim. 以我这样的体型,我不会走得太远。 So, no, I was, uh, I was actually a skilled player, score type of guy. Então, não, eu era, uh, eu era na verdade um jogador habilidoso, o tipo de cara de pontuação. 所以,不,我是,呃,我实际上是一个技术娴熟的球员,得分型的人。

Yeah.

Not, not a fighter. No, not me.

Elizabeth: Okay.

Okay.

Is it like a derogatory term? آیا مانند یک اصطلاح تحقیرآمیز است؟ É como um termo depreciativo? Is the, or is the goon... the goon in a team knows he's the goon and it's like a... proud thing or is it like they're made fun off because they're not very skilled, but they're crazy. É o, ou é o idiota ... o idiota em uma equipe sabe que ele é o idiota e é como uma ... coisa orgulhosa ou é como se eles fossem divertidos porque não são muito habilidosos, mas eles são louco. And they fight.

Mark: Yeah. A little of everything. Yeah.

Yeah.

They, uh, everybody knows what they're there for. Eles, uh, todo mundo sabe para que eles estão lá. They know everyone else knows and, but everybody respects what they do. Ze weten dat iedereen het weet en, maar iedereen respecteert wat ze doen. Eles sabem que todo mundo sabe e, mas todos respeitam o que fazem. Like it's not an easy thing to do. Como se não fosse uma coisa fácil de fazer. They're genuinely going out there and fighting the toughest guy in the other team. Eles estão realmente indo lá e lutando contra o cara mais duro do outro time.

Elizabeth: It's a skill. It's just another skill.

Mark: It's just another skill.

Yeah.

And then in theory, then they're there to have your back, like, because it is a fast game and there's a lot of, um, opportunity to, you know, try and intimidate and hurt other guys and hit them. E então, em teoria, eles estão lá para te dar cobertura, tipo, porque é um jogo rápido e há muitas, hum, oportunidades de, você sabe, tentar intimidar e machucar outros caras e acertá-los. 然后从理论上讲,他们会支持你,就像,因为这是一场快速的比赛,有很多,嗯,机会,你知道,试图恐吓和伤害其他人并打击他们。 And so it is nice to have a guy that's gonna push back. E é bom ter um cara que vai recuar. 所以很高兴有一个会反击的人。 And so, yeah, just the culture. It's, it's nobody looks down on those guys. É que ninguém menospreza esses caras.