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Pride and prejudice - book, Pride and prejudice - Chapter 4

Pride and prejudice - Chapter 4

Chapter 4

When Jane and Elizabeth were alone, the former, who had been cautious in her praise of Mr. Bingley before, expressed to her sister how very much she admired him.

“He is just what a young man ought to be,” said she, “sensible, good-humoured, lively; and I never saw such happy manners! so much ease, with such perfect good breeding!”

“He is also handsome,” replied Elizabeth, “which a young man ought likewise to be if he possibly can. His character is thereby complete.”

“I was very much flattered by his asking me to dance a second time. I did not expect such a compliment.”

“Did not you? I did for you. But that is one great difference between us. Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never. What could be more natural than his asking you again? He could not help seeing that you were about five times as pretty as every other woman in the room. No thanks to his gallantry for that. Well, he certainly is very agreeable, and I give you leave to like him. You have liked many a stupider person.”

“Dear Lizzy!”

“Oh, you are a great deal too apt, you know, to like people in general. You never see a fault in any body. All the world are good and agreeable in your eyes. I never heard you speak ill of a human being in my life.”

“I would wish not to be hasty in censuring any one; but I always speak what I think.”

“I know you do; and it is that which makes the wonder. With your good sense, to be so honestly blind to the follies and nonsense of others! Affection of candour is common enough; one meets with it every where. But, to be candid without ostentation or design,—to take the good of every body's character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad,—belongs to you alone. And so, you like this man's sisters, too, do you? Their manners are not equal to his.”

“Certainly not, at first; but they are very pleasing women when you converse with them. Miss Bingley is to live with her brother and keep his house; and I am much mistaken if we shall not find a very charming neighbour in her.”

Elizabeth listened in silence, but was not convinced: their behaviour at the assembly had not been calculated to please in general; and with more quickness of observation and less pliancy of temper than her sister, and with a judgment, too, unassailed by any attention to herself, she was very little disposed to approve them. They were, in fact, very fine ladies; not deficient in good-humour when they were pleased, nor in the power of being agreeable where they chose it; but proud and conceited. They were rather handsome; had been educated in one of the first private seminaries in town; had a fortune of twenty thousand pounds; were in the habit of spending more than they ought, and of associating with people of rank; and were, therefore, in every respect entitled to think well of themselves, and meanly of others. They were of a respectable family in the north of England; a circumstance more deeply impressed on their memories than that their brother's fortune and their own had been acquired by trade.

Mr. Bingley inherited property to the amount of nearly a hundred thousand pounds from his father, who had intended to purchase an estate, but did not live to do it. Mr. Bingley intended it likewise, and sometimes made choice of his county; but, as he was now provided with a good house and the liberty of a manor,f it was doubtful to many of those who best knew the easiness of his temper, whether he might not spend the remainder of his days at Netherfield, and leave the next generation to purchase.

His sisters were very anxious for his having an estate of his own; but though he was now established only as a tenant, Miss Bingley was by no means unwilling to preside at his table; nor was Mrs. Hurst, who had married a man of more fashion than fortune, less disposed to consider his house as her home when it suited her. Mr. Bingley had not been of age two years when he was tempted, by an accidental recommendation, to look at Netherfield House. He did look at it, and into it, for half an hour; was pleased with the situation and the principal rooms, satisfied with what the owner said in its praise, and took it immediately.

Between him and Darcy there was a very steady friendship, in spite of a great opposition of character. Bingley was endeared to Darcy by the easiness, openness, and ductility of his temper, though no disposition could offer a greater contrast to his own, and though with his own he never appeared dissatisfied. On the strength of Darcy's regard, Bingley had the firmest reliance, and of his judgment the highest opinion. In understanding, Darcy was the superior. Bingley was by no means deficient; but Darcy was clever. He was at the same time haughty, reserved, and fastidious; and his manners, though well bred, were not inviting. In that respect his friend had greatly the advantage. Bingley was sure of being liked wherever he appeared; Darcy was continually giving offence.

The manner in which they spoke of the Meryton assembly was sufficiently characteristic. Bingley had never met with pleasanter people or prettier girls in his life; every body had been most kind and attentive to him; there had been no formality, no stiffness; he had soon felt acquainted with all the room; and as to Miss Bennet, he could not conceive an angel more beautiful. Darcy, on the contrary, had seen a collection of people in whom there was little beauty and no fashion, for none of whom he had felt the smallest interest, and from none received either attention or pleasure. Miss Bennet he acknowledged to be pretty; but she smiled too much.

Mrs. Hurst and her sister allowed it to be so; but still they admired her and liked her, and pronounced her to be a sweet girl, and one whom they should not object to know more of. Miss Bennet was therefore established as a sweet girl; and their brother felt authorised by such commendation to think of her as he chose.


Pride and prejudice - Chapter 4

Chapter 4

When Jane and Elizabeth were alone, the former, who had been cautious in her praise of Mr. Bingley before, expressed to her sister how very much she admired him. Când Jane și Elizabeth erau singure, prima, care fusese mai precaută în laudele ei la adresa domnului Bingley, i-a spus surorii ei cât de mult îl admira. Jane ve Elizabeth yalnız kaldıklarında, daha önce Bay Bingley'i överken temkinli davranan birincisi, kız kardeşine ona ne kadar hayran olduğunu ifade etti.

“He is just what a young man ought to be,” said she, “sensible, good-humoured, lively; and I never saw such happy manners! “Ele é exatamente o que um jovem deve ser”, disse ela, “sensato, bem-humorado, animado; e eu nunca vi maneiras tão felizes! “Genç bir adamın olması gerektiği gibi” dedi, “mantıklı, güler yüzlü, canlı; ve böyle mutlu davranışlar görmedim! so much ease, with such perfect good breeding!” tanta facilidade, com tão perfeita boa criação!” atâta ușurință, cu o reproducere atât de bună!” böylesine mükemmel iyi bir üreme ile çok kolay!”

“He is also handsome,” replied Elizabeth, “which a young man ought likewise to be if he possibly can. “Ele também é bonito”, respondeu Elizabeth, “o que um jovem também deve ser se puder. "O da yakışıklı," diye yanıtladı Elizabeth, "eğer mümkünse genç bir adam da böyle olmalı. His character is thereby complete.” Seu caráter está assim completo.” Caracterul lui este astfel complet.” Böylece karakteri tamamlanmış oluyor.”

“I was very much flattered by his asking me to dance a second time. “Fiquei muito lisonjeado por ele me convidar para dançar pela segunda vez. I did not expect such a compliment.” Não esperava tamanho elogio.” Böyle bir iltifat beklemiyordum.”

“Did not you? "Você não? "Nu-i așa? "Yapmadın mı? I did for you. Eu fiz para você. Am făcut pentru tine. Senin için yaptım. But that is one great difference between us. Dar aceasta este o mare diferență între noi. Ama bu aramızdaki büyük bir fark. Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never. Elogios sempre te pegam de surpresa, e eu nunca. İltifatlar seni her zaman şaşırtıyor, ben ise asla. What could be more natural than his asking you again? O que poderia ser mais natural do que ele perguntar a você novamente? Ce poate fi mai natural decât să te întrebe din nou? Sana tekrar sormasından daha doğal ne olabilir? He could not help seeing that you were about five times as pretty as every other woman in the room. Ele não pôde deixar de ver que você era cerca de cinco vezes mais bonita do que qualquer outra mulher na sala. Nu a putut să nu vadă că ești de cinci ori mai drăguță decât orice altă femeie din cameră. Odadaki diğer tüm kadınlardan yaklaşık beş kat daha güzel olduğunu görmekten kendini alamadı. No thanks to his gallantry for that. Não, graças à sua bravura por isso. Bunun için onun yiğitliğine teşekkür etmem. Well, he certainly is very agreeable, and I give you leave to like him. Bem, ele certamente é muito agradável, e eu lhe dou permissão para gostar dele. Ei bine, cu siguranță este foarte agreabil și îți dau permisiunea să-l placi. Şey, kesinlikle çok hoş biri ve onu sevmen için sana izin veriyorum. You have liked many a stupider person.” Você gostou de muitas pessoas mais estúpidas.” Ți-au plăcut multe persoane mai proaste.” Sen çok daha aptal bir insandan hoşlandın.”

“Dear Lizzy!” “Querida Lizzy!” "Sevgili Lizzy!"

“Oh, you are a great deal too apt, you know, to like people in general. “Oh, você é muito apto, sabe, para gostar das pessoas em geral. "Ah, biliyorsun, genel olarak insanları sevmeye fazlasıyla yatkınsın. You never see a fault in any body. Você nunca vê uma falha em nenhum corpo. Hiçbir bedende asla kusur görmezsiniz. All the world are good and agreeable in your eyes. Todo o mundo é bom e agradável aos seus olhos. Tüm dünya senin gözünde iyi ve hoş. I never heard you speak ill of a human being in my life.” Eu nunca ouvi você falar mal de um ser humano na minha vida.” Nu te-am auzit în viața mea vorbind de rău despre o ființă umană.” Hayatımda bir insan hakkında kötü konuştuğunu hiç duymadım.”

“I would wish not to be hasty in censuring any one; but I always speak what I think.” “Eu gostaria de não ser precipitado em censurar ninguém; mas sempre falo o que penso.” “Hiç kimseyi kınamakta acele etmemek isterim; ama her zaman düşündüğümü söylerim.”

“I know you do; and it is that which makes the wonder. "Eu sei que você faz; e é isso que faz a maravilha. "Yaptığını biliyorum; ve mucizeyi yaratan da budur. With your good sense, to be so honestly blind to the follies and nonsense of others! Sağduyunuzla, başkalarının aptallıklarına ve saçmalıklarına karşı dürüstçe kör olmak! Affection of candour is common enough; one meets with it every where. Samimiyet sevgisi yeterince yaygındır; onunla her yerde karşılaşılır. But, to be candid without ostentation or design,—to take the good of every body's character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad,—belongs to you alone. Ancak, gösterişsiz ve plansız açık sözlü olmak, -her bedenin karakterinin iyiliğini alıp onu daha iyi hale getirmek ve kötüyü söylememek- yalnızca size aittir. And so, you like this man's sisters, too, do you? Demek bu adamın kız kardeşlerini de seviyorsun, öyle mi? Their manners are not equal to his.” Davranışları onunkine eşit değil.”

“Certainly not, at first; but they are very pleasing women when you converse with them. “Elbette hayır, başta; ama onlarla sohbet ettiğinizde çok hoş kadınlardır. Miss Bingley is to live with her brother and keep his house; and I am much mistaken if we shall not find a very charming neighbour in her.” Bayan Bingley, erkek kardeşiyle birlikte yaşayacak ve evini elinde tutacaktır; ve onda çok çekici bir komşu bulamazsak çok yanılıyorum."

Elizabeth listened in silence, but was not convinced: their behaviour at the assembly had not been calculated to please in general; and with more quickness of observation and less pliancy of temper than her sister, and with a judgment, too, unassailed by any attention to herself, she was very little disposed to approve them. Elizabeth sessizce dinledi ama ikna olmadı: toplantıdaki davranışları genel olarak memnun etmek için hesaplanmamıştı; ve kız kardeşinden daha hızlı gözlem ve daha az öfkeyle ve ayrıca herhangi bir ilgiden etkilenmeyen bir yargıyla, onları onaylamaya pek istekli değildi. They were, in fact, very fine ladies; not deficient in good-humour when they were pleased, nor in the power of being agreeable where they chose it; but proud and conceited. Aslında çok iyi hanımlardı; memnun olduklarında mizahtan yoksun olmadıkları gibi, istedikleri yerde hoş olma gücünden de yoksun olmayanlar; ama gururlu ve kibirli. They were rather handsome; had been educated in one of the first private seminaries in town; had a fortune of twenty thousand pounds; were in the habit of spending more than they ought, and of associating with people of rank; and were, therefore, in every respect entitled to think well of themselves, and meanly of others. Oldukça yakışıklıydılar; şehirdeki ilk özel seminerlerden birinde eğitim görmüştü; yirmi bin liralık bir serveti vardı; gereğinden fazla harcama ve yüksek rütbeli kişilerle arkadaşlık etme alışkanlığı içindeydiler; ve bu nedenle, her bakımdan kendileri ve başkaları hakkında iyi düşünmeye hakları vardı. They were of a respectable family in the north of England; a circumstance more deeply impressed on their memories than that their brother's fortune and their own had been acquired by trade. İngiltere'nin kuzeyinde saygın bir ailedendiler; Kardeşlerinin ve kendilerinin servetinin ticaretle kazanılmış olmasından daha çok hafızalarını derinden etkileyen bir durum.

Mr. Bingley inherited property to the amount of nearly a hundred thousand pounds from his father, who had intended to purchase an estate, but did not live to do it. Mr. Bingley intended it likewise, and sometimes made choice of his county; but, as he was now provided with a good house and the liberty of a manor,f it was doubtful to many of those who best knew the easiness of his temper, whether he might not spend the remainder of his days at Netherfield, and leave the next generation to purchase.

His sisters were very anxious for his having an estate of his own; but though he was now established only as a tenant, Miss Bingley was by no means unwilling to preside at his table; nor was Mrs. Hurst, who had married a man of more fashion than fortune, less disposed to consider his house as her home when it suited her. Mr. Bingley had not been of age two years when he was tempted, by an accidental recommendation, to look at Netherfield House. He did look at it, and into it, for half an hour; was pleased with the situation and the principal rooms, satisfied with what the owner said in its praise, and took it immediately.

Between him and Darcy there was a very steady friendship, in spite of a great opposition of character. Bingley was endeared to Darcy by the easiness, openness, and ductility of his temper, though no disposition could offer a greater contrast to his own, and though with his own he never appeared dissatisfied. On the strength of Darcy's regard, Bingley had the firmest reliance, and of his judgment the highest opinion. In understanding, Darcy was the superior. Bingley was by no means deficient; but Darcy was clever. He was at the same time haughty, reserved, and fastidious; and his manners, though well bred, were not inviting. In that respect his friend had greatly the advantage. Bingley was sure of being liked wherever he appeared; Darcy was continually giving offence.

The manner in which they spoke of the Meryton assembly was sufficiently characteristic. Bingley had never met with pleasanter people or prettier girls in his life; every body had been most kind and attentive to him; there had been no formality, no stiffness; he had soon felt acquainted with all the room; and as to Miss Bennet, he could not conceive an angel more beautiful. Darcy, on the contrary, had seen a collection of people in whom there was little beauty and no fashion, for none of whom he had felt the smallest interest, and from none received either attention or pleasure. Miss Bennet he acknowledged to be pretty; but she smiled too much.

Mrs. Hurst and her sister allowed it to be so; but still they admired her and liked her, and pronounced her to be a sweet girl, and one whom they should not object to know more of. Miss Bennet was therefore established as a sweet girl; and their brother felt authorised by such commendation to think of her as he chose.