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Pride and prejudice - book, Pride and prejudice - Chapter 1

Pride and prejudice - Chapter 1

Chapter 1

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters.

“My dear Mr. Bennet,” said his lady to him one day, “have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?”

Mr. Bennet replied that he had not.

“But it is,” returned she; “for Mrs. Long has just been here, and she told me all about it.”

Mr. Bennet made no answer.

“Do not you want to know who has taken it?” cried his wife, impatiently.

“You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.”

This was invitation enough.

“Why, my dear, you must know, Mrs. Long says that Netherfield is taken by a young man of large fortune from the north of England; that he came down on Monday in a chaise and four to see the place, and was so much delighted with it that he agreed with Mr. Morris immediately; that he is to take possession before Michaelmas,b and some of his servants are to be in the house by the end of next week.”

“What is his name?”

“Bingley.”

“Is he married or single?”

“Oh, single, my dear, to be sure! A single man of large fortune; four or five thousand a year.1 What a fine thing for our girls!”

“How so? how can it affect them?”

“My dear Mr. Bennet,” replied his wife, “how can you be so tiresome? You must know that I am thinking of his marrying one of them.”

“Is that his design in settling here?”

“Design! nonsense, how can you talk so! But it is very likely that he may fall in love with one of them, and therefore you must visit him as soon as he comes.”

“I see no occasion for that. You and the girls may go, or you may send them by themselves, which perhaps will be still better, for as you are as handsome as any of them, Mr. Bingley might like you the best of the party.”

“My dear, you flatter me. I certainly have my share of beauty, but I do not pretend to be any thing extraordinary now. When a woman has five grown up daughters, she ought to give over thinking of her own beauty.”

“In such cases, a woman has not often much beauty to think of.”

“But, my dear, you must indeed go and see Mr. Bingley when he comes into the neighbourhood.”

“It is more than I engage for, I assure you.”

“But consider your daughters. Only think what an establishment it would be for one of them. Sir William and Lady Lucas are determined to go, merely on that account; for in general, you know, they visit no new comers. Indeed you must go, for it will be impossible for us to visit him, if you do not.”

“You are over scrupulous, surely. I dare say Mr. Bingley will be very glad to see you; and I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying whichever he chooses of the girls; though I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy.”

“I desire you will do no such thing. Lizzy is not a bit better than the others; and I am sure she is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good-humoured as Lydia. But you are always giving her the preference.”

“They have none of them much to recommend them,” replied he: “they are all silly and ignorant like other girls; but Lizzy has something more of quickness than her sisters.”

“Mr. Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way? You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion on my poor nerves.”

“You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least.”

“Ah, you do not know what I suffer.”

“But I hope you will get over it, and live to see many young men of four thousand a year come into the neighbourhood.”

“It will be no use to us, if twenty such should come, since you will not visit them.”

“Depend upon it, my dear, that when there are twenty, I will visit them all.”

Mr. Bennet was so odd a mixture of quick parts,c sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three-and-twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character. Her mind was less difficult to develope. She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper. When she was discontented, she fancied herself nervous. The business of her life was to get her daughters married; its solace was visiting and news.


Pride and prejudice - Chapter 1 Mândrie și prejudecăți - Capitolul 1

Chapter 1 Capítulo 1

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife. Es una verdad universalmente reconocida, que un hombre soltero en posesión de una buena fortuna debe estar necesitado de una esposa. È una verità universalmente riconosciuta che un uomo solo in possesso di una buona fortuna deve essere in cerca di una moglie. Powszechnie uznana jest prawda, że samotnemu mężczyźnie, który ma szczęście, musi brakować żony. É uma verdade universalmente reconhecida que um homem solteiro com uma boa fortuna deve estar precisando de uma esposa However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters. Por muy poco conocidos que sean los sentimientos u opiniones de un hombre así cuando ingresa por primera vez a un vecindario, esta verdad está tan bien grabada en la mente de las familias circundantes, que se le considera como propiedad legítima de una u otra de sus hijas. . Per quanto poco conosciuti i sentimenti o le opinioni di un tale uomo possano essere al suo primo ingresso in un quartiere, questa verità è così ben fissata nelle menti delle famiglie circostanti, che è considerato come proprietà legittima dell'una o dell'altra delle loro figlie. . Jakkolwiek mało znane mogą być uczucia czy poglądy takiego mężczyzny, gdy po raz pierwszy wchodzi do sąsiedztwa, prawda ta jest tak dobrze utrwalona w świadomości okolicznych rodzin, że jest uważany za prawowitą własność którejś z ich córek. . Por mais que sejam pouco conhecidos os sentimentos ou opiniões de tal homem ao entrar pela primeira vez em uma vizinhança, essa verdade está tão bem fixada nas mentes das famílias vizinhas, que ele é considerado propriedade legítima de uma ou outra de suas filhas . Oricât de puțin cunoscute ar fi sentimentele sau părerile unui astfel de bărbat la prima sa intrare într-un cartier, acest adevăr este atât de bine fixat în mintea familiilor din jur, încât este considerat proprietatea de drept a uneia sau alteia dintre fiicele lor. .

“My dear Mr. Bennet,” said his lady to him one day, “have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?” "Mi querido señor Bennet", le dijo su señora un día, "¿ha oído que por fin se alquila Netherfield Park?" "Mio caro signor Bennet," gli disse un giorno la sua signora, "hai sentito che finalmente Netherfield Park è affittato?" „Mój drogi panie Bennet”, powiedziała pewnego dnia jego pani, „czy słyszał pan, że Netherfield Park jest wreszcie wynajęty?” „Dragul meu domnule Bennet”, i-a spus doamna lui într-o zi, „ați auzit că Netherfield Park este în sfârșit lăsat?”

Mr. Bennet replied that he had not. El Sr. Bennet respondió que no. Pan Bennet odpowiedział, że nie.

“But it is,” returned she; “for Mrs. Long has just been here, and she told me all about it.” "Pero lo es", respondió ella; "Porque la Sra. Long acaba de estar aquí y me lo contó todo". — Ale tak jest — odparła; „bo pani Long dopiero co tu była i wszystko mi opowiedziała”.

Mr. Bennet made no answer. El señor Bennet no respondió. Pan Bennet nie odpowiedział. Domnul Bennet nu răspunse.

“Do not you want to know who has taken it?” cried his wife, impatiently. "¿No quieres saber quién se lo ha llevado?" gritó su esposa con impaciencia. „Nie chcesz wiedzieć, kto go zabrał?” — zawołała niecierpliwie jego żona. „Nu vrei să știi cine a luat-o?” strigă nevasta-sa, nerăbdătoare. «Разве вы не хотите знать, кто его забрал?» - нетерпеливо воскликнула его жена.

“You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.” "Quieres decírmelo, y no tengo ningún inconveniente en escucharlo". „Chcesz mi powiedzieć, a ja nie mam nic przeciwko, żeby to usłyszeć”.

This was invitation enough. Esta fue una invitación suficiente. To było wystarczające zaproszenie.

“Why, my dear, you must know, Mrs. Long says that Netherfield is taken by a young man of large fortune from the north of England; that he came down on Monday in a chaise and four to see the place, and was so much delighted with it that he agreed with Mr. Morris immediately; that he is to take possession before Michaelmas,b and some of his servants are to be in the house by the end of next week.” —Bueno, querida, debes saber que la señora Long dice que Netherfield es tomado por un joven de gran fortuna del norte de Inglaterra; que bajó el lunes en un sillón y cuatro para ver el lugar, y quedó tan encantado con él que estuvo de acuerdo con el Sr. Morris inmediatamente; que tomará posesión antes de San Miguel, y algunos de sus sirvientes estarán en la casa a fines de la semana que viene ”. „Dlaczego, moja droga, musisz wiedzieć, pani Long mówi, że Netherfield zostaje zabrany przez młodego człowieka z dużą fortuną z północnej Anglii; że przyjechał w poniedziałek bryczką i czwórką, aby zobaczyć to miejsce, i był tak bardzo tym zachwycony, że natychmiast zgodził się z panem Morrisem; że ma objąć w posiadanie przed Michałem, a niektórzy z jego sług mają być w domu do końca przyszłego tygodnia”. „De ce, draga mea, trebuie să știi, doamna Long spune că Netherfield este luat de un tânăr cu o mare avere din nordul Angliei; că a coborât luni într-un șezlong și patru pentru a vedea locul și a fost atât de încântat de el, încât a fost de acord cu domnul Morris imediat; că el va lua stăpânirea înainte de Mihail,b și unii dintre servitorii săi vor fi în casă până la sfârșitul săptămânii viitoare.”

“What is his name?” "¿Cúal es su nombre?" "Jak on ma na imię?"

“Bingley.” „Bingley”.

“Is he married or single?” „Jest żonaty czy samotny?”

“Oh, single, my dear, to be sure! „Och, kawaler, moja droga, oczywiście! A single man of large fortune; four or five thousand a year.1 What a fine thing for our girls!” Un hombre soltero de gran fortuna; cuatro o cinco mil al año.1 ¡Qué gran cosa para nuestras chicas! " Samotny człowiek z dużą fortuną; cztery lub pięć tysięcy rocznie1. Co za wspaniała rzecz dla naszych dziewczyn! Un singur om de mare avere; patru sau cinci mii pe an.1 Ce lucru bun pentru fetele noastre!”

“How so? "Jak to? "Cum așa? how can it affect them?” jak to może na nich wpłynąć?”

“My dear Mr. Bennet,” replied his wife, “how can you be so tiresome? “Mi querido señor Bennet”, respondió su esposa, “¿cómo puede ser tan cansado? „Mój drogi panie Bennet”, odpowiedziała jego żona, „jak możesz być taki męczący? You must know that I am thinking of his marrying one of them.” Debes saber que estoy pensando en que se case con uno de ellos ". Musisz wiedzieć, że myślę o jego poślubieniu jednego z nich. Trebuie să știi că mă gândesc să se căsătorească cu unul dintre ei.”

“Is that his design in settling here?” "¿Es ese su propósito al establecerse aquí?" „Czy to jego zamiar osiedlenia się tutaj?” — Acesta este planul lui de a se stabili aici?

“Design! "Projekt! nonsense, how can you talk so! tonterías, ¿cómo puedes hablar así? nonsens, jak możesz tak mówić! But it is very likely that he may fall in love with one of them, and therefore you must visit him as soon as he comes.” Pero es muy probable que se enamore de uno de ellos, por lo que debes visitarlo en cuanto llegue ”. Ale jest bardzo prawdopodobne, że zakocha się w jednym z nich, dlatego musisz go odwiedzić, gdy tylko przyjdzie. Dar este foarte probabil ca el să se îndrăgostească de unul dintre ei și, prin urmare, trebuie să-l vizitezi de îndată ce vine.”

“I see no occasion for that. “No veo ocasión para eso. „Nie widzę ku temu okazji. You and the girls may go, or you may send them by themselves, which perhaps will be still better, for as you are as handsome as any of them, Mr. Bingley might like you the best of the party.” Tú y las chicas pueden irse, o puede enviarlas solas, lo que quizás sea aún mejor, porque como usted es tan guapo como cualquiera de ellas, al señor Bingley le gustará lo mejor de la fiesta. Ty i dziewczęta możesz iść, albo możesz wysłać je same, co może będzie jeszcze lepsze, bo jesteś równie przystojny jak każda z nich, więc pan Bingley może cię polubić jako najlepszy z towarzystwa. Tu și fetele puteți să mergeți sau le puteți trimite singuri, ceea ce poate va fi și mai bine, pentru că, fiindcă sunteți la fel de chipeș ca oricare dintre ele, domnului Bingley s-ar putea să vă placă cel mai bun din petrecere.

“My dear, you flatter me. „Moja droga, schlebiasz mi. I certainly have my share of beauty, but I do not pretend to be any thing extraordinary now. Ciertamente tengo mi parte de belleza, pero no pretendo ser nada extraordinario ahora. Z pewnością mam swój udział w pięknie, ale teraz nie udaję, że jestem niczym nadzwyczajnym. Cu siguranță am partea mea de frumusețe, dar nu mă prefac că sunt ceva extraordinar acum. When a woman has five grown up daughters, she ought to give over thinking of her own beauty.” Cuando una mujer tiene cinco hijas mayores, debe dejar de pensar en su propia belleza ". Kiedy kobieta ma pięć dorosłych córek, powinna przestać myśleć o własnej urodzie”. Când o femeie are cinci fiice mari, ea ar trebui să renunțe la gândirea la propria frumusețe.”

“In such cases, a woman has not often much beauty to think of.” "En tales casos, una mujer no suele tener mucha belleza en la que pensar". „W takich przypadkach kobieta często nie ma zbyt wiele piękna, o której mogłaby myśleć”. „În astfel de cazuri, o femeie nu are adesea prea multă frumusețe la care să se gândească.”

“But, my dear, you must indeed go and see Mr. Bingley when he comes into the neighbourhood.” Pero, querida, debes ir a ver al señor Bingley cuando venga al barrio. „Ale, moja droga, naprawdę musisz iść i zobaczyć się z panem Bingleyem, kiedy pojawi się w okolicy”.

“It is more than I engage for, I assure you.” "Es más de lo que me comprometo, te lo aseguro". – Zapewniam cię, że to więcej, niż się angażuję. „Este mai mult decât mă angajez, vă asigur.”

“But consider your daughters. Pero consideren a sus hijas. — Ale pomyśl o swoich córkach. „Dar luați în considerare fiicele voastre. Only think what an establishment it would be for one of them. Solo piense en el establecimiento que sería para uno de ellos. Pomyśl tylko, jaki byłby to zakład dla jednego z nich. Sir William and Lady Lucas are determined to go, merely on that account; for in general, you know, they visit no new comers. Sir William y Lady Lucas están decididos a ir, simplemente por ese motivo; porque en general, ya sabes, no visitan a los recién llegados. Sir William i lady Lucas są zdeterminowani, aby odejść, tylko z tego powodu; bo w ogóle, wiesz, nie odwiedzają nowych przybyszów. Indeed you must go, for it will be impossible for us to visit him, if you do not.” De hecho, debes ir, porque será imposible que lo visitemos si no lo haces ". Zaprawdę, musisz iść, bo nie będziemy mogli go odwiedzić, jeśli tego nie zrobisz.

“You are over scrupulous, surely. Seguro que eres demasiado escrupuloso. – Z pewnością jesteś zbyt skrupulatny. I dare say Mr. Bingley will be very glad to see you; and I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying whichever he chooses of the girls; though I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy.” Me atrevo a decir que el Sr. Bingley estará muy contento de verte; y le enviaré algunas líneas para asegurarle mi sincero consentimiento para que se case con la que elija de las chicas; aunque debo decir una buena palabra por mi pequeña Lizzy ". Śmiem twierdzić, że pan Bingley bardzo się ucieszy, że cię zobaczy; i wyślę kilka linijek przez ciebie, aby zapewnić go o mojej serdecznej zgodzie na jego małżeństwo, którąkolwiek wybierze z dziewcząt; chociaż muszę rzucić dobre słowo o mojej małej Lizzy.

“I desire you will do no such thing. “Deseo que no hagas tal cosa. „Pragnę, żebyś nie zrobił czegoś takiego. Lizzy is not a bit better than the others; and I am sure she is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good-humoured as Lydia. Lizzy no es ni un poco mejor que los demás; y estoy seguro de que no es ni la mitad de guapa que Jane ni la mitad de buen humor que Lydia. Lizzy nie jest ani trochę lepsza od pozostałych; i jestem pewien, że nie jest ani w połowie tak przystojna jak Jane, ani w połowie tak pogodna jak Lydia. But you are always giving her the preference.” Pero siempre le estás dando la preferencia ".

“They have none of them much to recommend them,” replied he: “they are all silly and ignorant like other girls; but Lizzy has something more of quickness than her sisters.” “No tienen mucho que recomendarles”, respondió él: “todas son tontas e ignorantes como otras chicas; pero Lizzy tiene algo más de rapidez que sus hermanas ". „Żaden z nich nie ma im wiele do polecenia”, odpowiedział: „wszyscy są głupi i ignorantami jak inne dziewczyny; ale Lizzy ma w sobie coś więcej bystrości niż jej siostry.

“Mr. Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way? Bennet, ¿cómo puedes abusar de tus propios hijos de esa manera? Bennet, jak możesz znęcać się nad własnymi dziećmi w taki sposób? You take delight in vexing me. Te encanta molestarme. Lubisz mnie drażnić. You have no compassion on my poor nerves.” No tienes compasión de mis pobres nervios ". Nie masz współczucia na moje biedne nerwy.

“You mistake me, my dear. Me confundes, querida. – Mylisz się ze mną, moja droga. I have a high respect for your nerves. Tengo un gran respeto por tus nervios. Mam duży szacunek dla twoich nerwów. They are my old friends. Son mis viejos amigos. To moi starzy przyjaciele. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least.” Te he oído mencionarlos con consideración estos veinte años al menos ". Słyszałem, jak wspominasz o nich z rozwagą przynajmniej przez te dwadzieścia lat.

“Ah, you do not know what I suffer.” "Ah, no sabes lo que sufro". „Ach, nie wiesz, co cierpię”.

“But I hope you will get over it, and live to see many young men of four thousand a year come into the neighbourhood.” "Pero espero que lo superes y vivas para ver a muchos jóvenes de cuatro mil al año venir al vecindario". „Ale mam nadzieję, że poradzisz sobie z tym i dożyjesz, że w sąsiedztwie pojawi się wielu młodych mężczyzn w wieku czterech tysięcy rocznie”.

“It will be no use to us, if twenty such should come, since you will not visit them.” "No nos servirá de nada que vengan veinte de ellos, ya que no los visitarás". — Na nic nam się nie przyda, jeśli przyjdzie dwudziestu takich, bo ich nie odwiedzisz.

“Depend upon it, my dear, that when there are twenty, I will visit them all.” "Confía, querida, que cuando sean veinte, los visitaré a todos". „Polegaj na tym, moja droga, że gdy będzie ich dwudziestu, odwiedzę ich wszystkich”.

Mr. Bennet was so odd a mixture of quick parts,c sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three-and-twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character. El señor Bennet era una mezcla tan extraña de partes rápidas, humor sarcástico, reserva y capricho, que la experiencia de veintitrés años había sido insuficiente para que su esposa entendiera su carácter. Pan Bennet był tak dziwną mieszanką szybkich ról, sarkastycznego humoru, powściągliwości i kaprysu, że doświadczenie trzech i dwudziestu lat nie wystarczyło, by żona zrozumiała jego charakter. Her mind was less difficult to develope. Su mente fue menos difícil de desarrollar. Jej umysł był mniej trudny do rozwinięcia. She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper. Era una mujer de mala comprensión, poca información y temperamento incierto. Była kobietą mało wyrozumiałą, mało informacji i niepewnym temperamentem. When she was discontented, she fancied herself nervous. Cuando estaba descontenta, se creía nerviosa. Kiedy była niezadowolona, wyobrażała sobie, że jest zdenerwowana. The business of her life was to get her daughters married; its solace was visiting and news. El negocio de su vida era casar a sus hijas; su consuelo eran visitas y noticias. Zajęciem jej życia było poślubienie córek; jego pociecha była wizytą i wiadomościami. Afacerea vieții ei era să-și căsătorească fiicele; mângâierea lui era vizita și știrile.