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Jokes in English, Lesson #3: More Knock Knock Jokes

Lesson #3: More Knock Knock Jokes

Although all knock knock jokes have to start with someone saying, “Knock, knock,” and another person replying, “Who’s there?”, sometimes the rest of the joke can be different. Here is an example of one:

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Banana.

2ndperson:  Banana who?

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Banana.

2ndperson:  Banana who?

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Orange.

2ndperson:  Orange who?

1stperson:  Orange you glad I didn’t say banana again?

This punchline uses the word “orange” to sound like the English, “Aren’t you?”

Sometimes knock knock jokes come in a series. They are several jokes that are all tied together somehow. Here is a series of knock knock jokes that are about the Easter Bunny.

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Ether.

2ndperson:  Ether who?

1stperson:  Ether Bunny.

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Cargo.

2ndperson:  Cargo who?

1stperson:  Cargo beep beep, run over Ether Bunny.

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Boo.

2ndperson:  Boo who?

1stperson:  Don’t cry. Ether Bunny be back next year.

The Easter Bunny is a fictional character who comes at Easter to fill children’s Easter baskets with candy and toys. In this series of jokes, the word “Easter” is pronounced as “ether.” Ether is a liquid that used to be used as an anesthetic. It puts people to sleep if they inhale the smell. When people have a lisp, they can’t pronounce the s sound. When they try to pronounce the s sound, it comes out like a th sound. Someone with a lisp would pronounce “Easter” as “ether.”

In the second joke, “cargo” is pronounced just like the two separate words “car go.” When learning English, little children (and almost everyone who learns it) will forget to put the –s at the end of third person singular of the verb. The words should be, “the car goes,” but since this is a little children’s joke, it uses a little child’s way of saying it, “car go.” The same thing is true of the word “run.” It should be, “It runs over the Easter Bunny.” The –s needs to be there for good grammar, but young children often leave the –s off when they are little.

The last joke uses the same little child way of saying the punchline. Instead of saying, “The Easter Bunny will be back next year,” it comes out as, “Ether Bunny be back next year.” It’s very common for little children to leave out the word, “will” here.

In English, the sound of crying is often written as boohoo.

Knock knock jokes are very popular, but they can be difficult to understand unless you know the English language very well.



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Lesson #3: More Knock Knock Jokes

Although all knock knock jokes have to start with someone saying, “Knock, knock,” and another person replying, “Who’s there?”, sometimes the rest of the joke can be different. Here is an example of one:

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Banana.

2ndperson:  Banana who?

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Banana.

2ndperson:  Banana who?

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Orange.

2ndperson:  Orange who?

1stperson:  Orange you glad I didn’t say banana again?

This punchline uses the word “orange” to sound like the English, “Aren’t you?”

Sometimes knock knock jokes come in a series. They are several jokes that are all tied together somehow. Here is a series of knock knock jokes that are about the Easter Bunny.

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Ether.

2ndperson:  Ether who?

1stperson:  Ether Bunny.

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Cargo.

2ndperson:  Cargo who?

1stperson:  Cargo beep beep, run over Ether Bunny.

1stperson:  Knock, knock.

2ndperson:  Who’s there?

1stperson:  Boo.

2ndperson:  Boo who?

1stperson:  Don’t cry. Ether Bunny be back next year.

The Easter Bunny is a fictional character who comes at Easter to fill children’s Easter baskets with candy and toys. In this series of jokes, the word “Easter” is pronounced as “ether.” Ether is a liquid that used to be used as an anesthetic. It puts people to sleep if they inhale the smell. When people have a lisp, they can’t pronounce the s sound. When they try to pronounce the s sound, it comes out like a th sound. Someone with a lisp would pronounce “Easter” as “ether.”

In the second joke, “cargo” is pronounced just like the two separate words “car go.” When learning English, little children (and almost everyone who learns it) will forget to put the –s at the end of third person singular of the verb. The words should be, “the car goes,” but since this is a little children’s joke, it uses a little child’s way of saying it, “car go.” The same thing is true of the word “run.” It should be, “It runs over the Easter Bunny.” The –s needs to be there for good grammar, but young children often leave the –s off when they are little.

The last joke uses the same little child way of saying the punchline. Instead of saying, “The Easter Bunny will be back next year,” it comes out as, “Ether Bunny be back next year.” It’s very common for little children to leave out the word, “will” here.

In English, the sound of crying is often written as boohoo.

Knock knock jokes are very popular, but they can be difficult to understand unless you know the English language very well.


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