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Jokes in English, Lesson #2: Knock Knock Jokes

Lesson #2:  Knock Knock Jokes

A popular type of joke for children to use is a knock knock joke. Every knock knock joke starts with, “Knock, knock.” This is the sound of someone hitting a door to ask for entrance. When the first person says, “Knock, knock,” the response from the second person is always, “Who's there?” The person telling the joke will say something. Then the second person repeats what the first person said and adds, “who?” The person telling the joke will then give the punchline (the last line of a joke, the part that makes you laugh).

Here are some examples of knock knock jokes and the explanation of them.

1st person: Knock, knock.

2nd person: Who's there?

1st person: Amos.

2nd person: Amos who?

1st person: A mosquito bit me.

Many knock knock jokes use the names of people. This one uses the name Amos. It sounds like the beginning two words of the last line (the punchline), a mosquito. Here is one to use after this one.

1st person: Knock, knock.

2nd person: Who's there?

1st person: Andy.

2nd person: Andy who?

1st person: Andy bit me again.

Amos and Andy were two characters from an old radio show that started in the 1920s. This is probably why they are paired together with these two knock knock jokes. Andy is used here as the same sound as “and he” in English.

Here's another knock knock joke that uses a person's name.

1st person: Knock, knock.

2nd person: Who's there?

1st person: Noah.

2nd person: Noah who?

1st person: Noah body.

In this one, the punchline, “Noah body” sounds like the English word, “Nobody.”

Sometimes the joke teller uses something other than people's names. Here's an example:

1st person: Knock, knock.

2nd person: Who's there?

1st person: Aardvark.

2nd person: Aardvark who?

1st person: Aardvark a hundred miles for one of your smiles.

Most knock knock jokes use plays on words. In this joke, the play is on the word aardvark. An aardvark is an animal that eats ants. In English, we often call this kind of animal an anteater. An anteater and an aardvark are the same thing. In the punchline, the word aardvark is used because it is pronounced similarly to the English, “I'd walk.” The phrase “I'd walk a hundred miles for one of your smiles” is from an old song that was made popular by Al Jolson in the 1920s.

1st person: Knock, knock.

2nd person: Who's there?

1st person: One shoe.

2nd person: One shoe who?

1st person: One shoe open the door?

In this joke, “one shoe” sounds like the English, “won't you.” The punchline sounds like, “Won't you open the door?”

There are thousands of knock knock jokes in English. They can be hard to understand if you don't know the words the punchline sounds like. They are very common types of jokes, though.



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Lesson #2:  Knock Knock Jokes

A popular type of joke for children to use is a knock knock joke. Every knock knock joke starts with, “Knock, knock.” This is the sound of someone hitting a door to ask for entrance. When the first person says, “Knock, knock,” the response from the second person is always, “Who's there?” The person telling the joke will say something. Then the second person repeats what the first person said and adds, “who?” The person telling the joke will then give the punchline (the last line of a joke, the part that makes you laugh).

Here are some examples of knock knock jokes and the explanation of them.

1st person: Knock, knock.

2nd person: Who's there?

1st person: Amos.

2nd person: Amos who?

1st person: A mosquito bit me.

Many knock knock jokes use the names of people. This one uses the name Amos. It sounds like the beginning two words of the last line (the punchline), a mosquito. Here is one to use after this one.

1st person: Knock, knock.

2nd person: Who's there?

1st person: Andy.

2nd person: Andy who?

1st person: Andy bit me again.

Amos and Andy were two characters from an old radio show that started in the 1920s. This is probably why they are paired together with these two knock knock jokes. Andy is used here as the same sound as “and he” in English.

Here's another knock knock joke that uses a person's name.

1st person: Knock, knock.

2nd person: Who's there?

1st person: Noah.

2nd person: Noah who?

1st person: Noah body.

In this one, the punchline, “Noah body” sounds like the English word, “Nobody.”

Sometimes the joke teller uses something other than people's names. Here's an example:

1st person: Knock, knock.

2nd person: Who's there?

1st person: Aardvark.

2nd person: Aardvark who?

1st person: Aardvark a hundred miles for one of your smiles.

Most knock knock jokes use plays on words. In this joke, the play is on the word aardvark. An aardvark is an animal that eats ants. In English, we often call this kind of animal an anteater. An anteater and an aardvark are the same thing. In the punchline, the word aardvark is used because it is pronounced similarly to the English, “I'd walk.” The phrase “I'd walk a hundred miles for one of your smiles” is from an old song that was made popular by Al Jolson in the 1920s.

1st person: Knock, knock.

2nd person: Who's there?

1st person: One shoe.

2nd person: One shoe who?

1st person: One shoe open the door?

In this joke, “one shoe” sounds like the English, “won't you.” The punchline sounds like, “Won't you open the door?”

There are thousands of knock knock jokes in English. They can be hard to understand if you don't know the words the punchline sounds like. They are very common types of jokes, though.


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