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Breaking News English .com, Ecuador Police To Take Lie Detector Test (17th August, 2011)

Ecuador's government is going to make all of its police officers take a lie detector test. The BBC reports that police chief General Wilson Alulema wants all of the police to take the test to help end corruption in the force. It is part of president Rafael Correa's efforts to modernize the force following a police mutiny last year. In September, 2010, Ecuador's police mutinied against a law that would have affected their pay and bonuses. They abandoned their posts and left much of the country without protection, which sparked nationwide looting and unrest. President Correa faced the mutineers and challenged them to kill him – a bad idea as his own police attacked him with tear gas and he had to be rescued by the army.

As many as 42,000 officers will take the test. General Alulema says it will help stop police officers taking bribes and turning a blind eye to crime. The General said he hoped the test would lead to the sacking of any officer linked to corruption. He told reporters he is facing an uphill struggle to root out corruption. He pointed to around 300 officials suspended over corruption allegations who were recently given their jobs back. Judges argued there were too many irregularities for a case to be made against them. The BBC reports the General as saying: “Those judges don't understand the gravity of their decisions.” Perhaps governments around the world should closely follow the results of the tests and consider similar checks on their politicians.

Classroom handouts, online activities and a listening for this article are at

http://www.breakingnewsenglish.com/1108/110817-lies.html



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Ecuador's government is going to make all of its police officers take a lie detector test. The BBC reports that police chief General Wilson Alulema wants all of the police to take the test to help end corruption in the force. It is part of president Rafael Correa's efforts to modernize the force following a police mutiny last year. In September, 2010, Ecuador's police mutinied against a law that would have affected their pay and bonuses. They abandoned their posts and left much of the country without protection, which sparked nationwide looting and unrest. President Correa faced the mutineers and challenged them to kill him – a bad idea as his own police attacked him with tear gas and he had to be rescued by the army.

As many as 42,000 officers will take the test. General Alulema says it will help stop police officers taking bribes and turning a blind eye to crime. The General said he hoped the test would lead to the sacking of any officer linked to corruption. He told reporters he is facing an uphill struggle to root out corruption. He pointed to around 300 officials suspended over corruption allegations who were recently given their jobs back. Judges argued there were too many irregularities for a case to be made against them. The BBC reports the General as saying: “Those judges don't understand the gravity of their decisions.” Perhaps governments around the world should closely follow the results of the tests and consider similar checks on their politicians.

Classroom handouts, online activities and a listening for this article are at

http://www.breakingnewsenglish.com/1108/110817-lies.html


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