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Healthcare Org 1, 4.07 (R) [INFO] Topic 3. Judge the Quality of a Poster

Topic 3. How do you Judge the quality (content presentation and format) of a poster? The quality of a poster is usually judged on two major factors:1) whether the poster content is sufficient for its intended purpose, and 2) whether the poster appearance is such that the content can be grasped relatively easily. Most posters are produced for a specific purpose (e.g., a conference, a meeting) and the sufficiency of the content is related to its purpose. If the poster is to be formally judged, the organization hosting the "poster event" usually provides both the poster judging criteria and the judges. In short, you judge the quality (content presentation and format) of a poster according to the criteria set for the judging. This section discusses: Overview of Peer-Review Poster Assignment Criteria for Judging the Poster Quality Poster Presentation Elevator Speech Overview of Peer-Review Poster Assignment You submit your poster and peer-review the poster of two of your learner colleagues in the Lesson Four Self-Evaluations and Peer Review section of this course, specifically in the Poster Submission and Evaluation (Required). Your poster is peer-reviewed by two of your learner colleagues. You submit the poster as a PDF file; save the file you developed in the poster presentation software (e.g., PowerPoint) as a PDF and upload it in the Poster Submission and Evaluation (Required) section of the course. It should be noted that the main point of this peer-review assignment is for you to have the experience of critically judging (evaluating) the quality (content presentation and format) of a poster other than your own within a forum where your judgement has meaning. Your judgement has meaning because your judgement determines your learner colleague's grade on the poster assignment. Your judgement carries with it the responsibility to be critical, honest, fair, and consistent across all posters you judge; that is, the same responsibility found for any subjective judgement where the judgement outcome affects a person's life. In the best of all possible worlds, poster evaluators would first norm their evaluation against a standard. One method for doing this is to have each evaluator view the same sample of posters of differing qualities until the group of evaluators agrees on the same score to assign to each quality-level. This is not done in this course (although a sample poster is provided in the attached file below - Coursera_PD_HealthcareOrganization.pdf) so it is reasonable to assume that different evaluators may assign different scores to the same quality-level characteristic.

Coursera_PD_HealthcareOrganization.pdf PDF File

It is no surprise to any learner that some evaluators are harder graders than others. You may be a very hard grader; you may be a very easy grader. Those evaluating your poster may be very hard graders; they may be very easy graders. To account for the possible difference in the grading styles of those evaluating your poster (e.g., you are evaluated by two very hard graders), the passing grade is set at 50 percent (rather than 80 or 90 percent). Your grade is the combination of the grades (scores) given you by your two learner colleague evaluators. Note: If you do not achieve 50 percent (if you do not receive a passing score on the poster assignment) and believe it to be the result of having been evaluated by two unusually hard graders, please contact us to resolve the situation. Criteria for Judging the Poster Quality In the poster project (assignment) for this course, the poster content criteria have been specified throughout the course as have the criteria for the poster appearance. Your poster will be judged by these criteria (listed below). You will judge two (2) other posters using the criteria. The score for each of the twenty-seven (27) evaluation criteria questions/items is: Yes (1 point) and No (0 points). In evaluating a poster on each evaluation question item, if the answer to the question is more Yes than No in your judgment, answer Yes to the item question. The poster display does not have to be perfect with respect to the evaluation criteria for a Yes answer/judgment. The 27 criteria evaluation questions are: Does the poster display a name for the healthcare organization which is original and appealing to both employees of the healthcare organization as well as the public at-large? Does the poster display a brief description of the healthcare organization (a description of what the healthcare organization does) which concisely and clearly summarizes the work and purpose of the healthcare organization in a few sentences? Does the poster display at least one healthcare occupation employed by the organization as that occupation is listed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) at the Healthcare Occupations website? Is this healthcare occupation consistent with the healthcare organization's description? More can be listed, but only one is needed. There is no need to list other occupations employed by the organization (e.g., accountants) or the number of people employed. Does the poster display a North American Classification System (NAICS) code for the healthcare organization which is appropriate for the organization's description? Does the poster display a valid U.S. state (or the District of Columbia) and a valid county of that state in which the healthcare organization is located? Does the poster display valid county health ranking information from the County Health Rankings and Roadmap website for the county in which healthcare organization is located? Does the poster display the valid name and web address (url) of the state licensing agency for healthcare organizations for the state in which the healthcare organization is located (e.g., Department of Health)? Does the poster display one valid accreditation association for the healthcare organization, if any exist? If one is named, does the poster display whether this accreditation association has deeming authority from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) for the healthcare organization? If no accreditation association is listed, and there really are no valid accreditation associations for the healthcare organization, answer Yes for this review question. Does the poster display one strategic goal for the healthcare organization which is a broad and bold one for the organization as a whole, but doable? Does the poster display a rank order of the eleven (11) combined Healthcare Leadership Alliance (HLA) and American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) competencies listed in the course where 1 is the most important and 11 is the least important? Does the poster display the name of two real journals (and the url for the journal or publication) which a healthcare administrator could use to find evidence for the evidence-based practice of healthcare administration? Does the poster display the name of an administrative/management framework (or combination of frameworks) which a healthcare administrator could use? If the author/presenter describes a personally developed framework, is it described it in a sentence or two? Does the poster display the name of one real healthcare administration-related professional association (and the url for the association) which a healthcare administrator for this healthcare organization might join? Does the poster display whether the governance structure of the healthcare organization is shared or not-shared and display a brief description of the governance relationship between the administrative part of the organization and the professional clinical part of the organization in a few sentences which concisely and clearly summarize a reasonable governance structure? Does the poster display a business structure for the healthcare organization and the valid name and web address (url) of the state agency in the chosen state with which the organization must file legal business structure documents (e.g., Department of State)? Does the poster display a tax status for the healthcare organization and the valid name and web address (url) of the state agency in the chosen state with which the organization must file legal tax documents (e.g., Department of Treasury)? Does the poster display the healthcare organization's mission statement and vision statement in no more than a few sentences which concisely and clearly state a reasonable mission and vision for the organization? Does the poster display whether the healthcare organization has a Board of Directors/Trustees? If the organization has a Board of Directors/Trustees, does the poster display a description of the general characteristics of Board members? If the organization does not have a Board of Directors/Trustees, does the poster display a description of how the oversight and expertise generally accomplished by a Board of Directors/Trustees is achieved in the healthcare organization? Do these descriptions concisely and clearly summarize reasonable characteristics for Board members or a reasonable alternate oversight mechanism in a few sentences? Is the electronic poster one slide (e.g., one PowerPoint slide)? Is the page size (page setup) of the slide 48 inches (width) by 36 inches (height); landscape orientation? The standard page size of a PowerPoint slide is 10 inches (width) by 7.5 inches height); landscape orientation. Note: If you open the pdf file and view it in "Actual Size", the size of the poster will be displayed in the lower left corner of the pdf frame and should display 48.00 x 36.00 in. Does the poster design layout have sufficient space between the content (i.e., text, graphics, images); that is, is there sufficient “white space” so the poster does not appear cluttered? Is there a border (white space) around the edge of the poster which serves as a frame for the poster content; that is, content does not continue to the very edge of the slide/poster? Is one font-type is used for the entire poster and is the font-type chosen easily readable and not distracting from the content? Common choices for a poster font-type include: Arial, Book Antigua, Bookman Old Style, Calibri, Cambria, Garamond, Helvetica, and Times New Roman. Is the font-size for the different content sections/types of the poster different while the font-size for a specific content section/type is the same across the entire poster? The recommended range of font-size for the different content sections/types is: poster title = 55 points to 60 points; poster author name = 50 points to 54 points; poster headings = 32 points to 48 points; poster sub-headings = 20 points to 31 points; main body text/narrative = 18 points to 36 points; graphic/image captions = 16 points to 18 points Does the poster format only uses graphics/images in support of the poster content; the reason for any graphics/images and their interpretation are clear to the poster viewer/reader? Note: If no graphics/images are used, answer Yes. Is the poster title is less than 15 words and provides the poster viewer/reader a clear understanding of the poster's focus? Is a name for the poster presenter/developer shown below the poster title? Note: The name shown does not have to be your name. It just needs to be a name. In the example poster, the name of the presenter/developer is I.M. Incharge. You can use the same name if you wish. Poster Presentation Elevator Speech Usually a poster is displayed in conjunction with an oral presentation or speech by the poster developer/author. Such an oral presentation/speech is not used in this course, but it is worthwhile to look at the characteristics of such an oral presentation/speech. At its core, the poster illustrates and reinforces the oral presentation/speech and vice versa. One common characteristic is what is known as the "elevator speech" or "elevator pitch". This speech/pitch is a short verbal/oral description of the poster content/concept (or a company, idea, research, etc.) which: " explains the concept in a way such that any listener can understand it in a short period of time ... The goal is simply to convey the overall concept or topic in an exciting way ... The name—elevator pitch—reflects the idea that it should be possible to deliver the summary in the time span of an elevator ride, or approximately thirty seconds to two minutes. " (Website Source of Quote) The elevator speech/pitch begins the oral presentation/speech about the poster content. Below are some resources which are helpful in crafting the elevator speech/pitch: Win the Business with this Elevator Pitch How to Craft a Successful Elevator Pitch Tips for Developing a Nonprofit "Elevator Pitch" for Your Board Members 6 tips for putting together the perfect elevator pitch

Note [FUN]: The video for Topic 3 - The Perfect Elevator Pitch - is a YouTube video produced by the Rice Business Plan Competition (RBPC) discussing what works and what does not work in an elevator speech/pitch.



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Topic 3. How do you Judge the quality (content presentation and format) of a poster? The quality of a poster is usually judged on two major factors:1) whether the poster content is sufficient for its intended purpose, and 2) whether the poster appearance is such that the content can be grasped relatively easily. Most posters are produced for a specific purpose (e.g., a conference, a meeting) and the sufficiency of the content is related to its purpose. If the poster is to be formally judged, the organization hosting the "poster event" usually provides both the poster judging criteria and the judges. In short, you judge the quality (content presentation and format) of a poster according to the criteria set for the judging. This section discusses: Overview of Peer-Review Poster Assignment Criteria for Judging the Poster Quality Poster Presentation Elevator Speech Overview of Peer-Review Poster Assignment You submit your poster and peer-review the poster of two of your learner colleagues in the Lesson Four Self-Evaluations and Peer Review section of this course, specifically in the Poster Submission and Evaluation (Required). Your poster is peer-reviewed by two of your learner colleagues. You submit the poster as a PDF file; save the file you developed in the poster presentation software (e.g., PowerPoint) as a PDF and upload it in the Poster Submission and Evaluation (Required) section of the course. It should be noted that the main point of this peer-review assignment is for you to have the experience of critically judging (evaluating) the quality (content presentation and format) of a poster other than your own within a forum where your judgement has meaning. Your judgement has meaning because your judgement determines your learner colleague's grade on the poster assignment. Your judgement carries with it the responsibility to be critical, honest, fair, and consistent across all posters you judge; that is, the same responsibility found for any subjective judgement where the judgement outcome affects a person's life. In the best of all possible worlds, poster evaluators would first norm their evaluation against a standard. One method for doing this is to have each evaluator view the same sample of posters of differing qualities until the group of evaluators agrees on the same score to assign to each quality-level. This is not done in this course (although a sample poster is provided in the attached file below - Coursera_PD_HealthcareOrganization.pdf) so it is reasonable to assume that different evaluators may assign different scores to the same quality-level characteristic.

Coursera_PD_HealthcareOrganization.pdf PDF File

It is no surprise to any learner that some evaluators are harder graders than others. You may be a very hard grader; you may be a very easy grader. Those evaluating your poster may be very hard graders; they may be very easy graders. To account for the possible difference in the grading styles of those evaluating your poster (e.g., you are evaluated by two very hard graders), the passing grade is set at 50 percent (rather than 80 or 90 percent). Your grade is the combination of the grades (scores) given you by your two learner colleague evaluators. Note: If you do not achieve 50 percent (if you do not receive a passing score on the poster assignment) and believe it to be the result of having been evaluated by two unusually hard graders, please contact us to resolve the situation. Criteria for Judging the Poster Quality In the poster project (assignment) for this course, the poster content criteria have been specified throughout the course as have the criteria for the poster appearance. Your poster will be judged by these criteria (listed below). You will judge two (2) other posters using the criteria. The score for each of the twenty-seven (27) evaluation criteria questions/items is: Yes (1 point) and No (0 points). In evaluating a poster on each evaluation question item, if the answer to the question is more Yes than No in your judgment, answer Yes to the item question. The poster display does not have to be perfect with respect to the evaluation criteria for a Yes answer/judgment. The 27 criteria evaluation questions are: Does the poster display a name for the healthcare organization which is original and appealing to both employees of the healthcare organization as well as the public at-large? Does the poster display a brief description of the healthcare organization (a description of what the healthcare organization does) which concisely and clearly summarizes the work and purpose of the healthcare organization in a few sentences? Does the poster display at least one healthcare occupation employed by the organization as that occupation is listed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) at the Healthcare Occupations website? Is this healthcare occupation consistent with the healthcare organization's description? More can be listed, but only one is needed. There is no need to list other occupations employed by the organization (e.g., accountants) or the number of people employed. Does the poster display a North American Classification System (NAICS) code for the healthcare organization which is appropriate for the organization's description? Does the poster display a valid U.S. state (or the District of Columbia) and a valid county of that state in which the healthcare organization is located? Does the poster display valid county health ranking information from the County Health Rankings and Roadmap website for the county in which healthcare organization is located? Does the poster display the valid name and web address (url) of the state licensing agency for healthcare organizations for the state in which the healthcare organization is located (e.g., Department of Health)? Does the poster display one valid accreditation association for the healthcare organization, if any exist? If one is named, does the poster display whether this accreditation association has deeming authority from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) for the healthcare organization? If no accreditation association is listed, and there really are no valid accreditation associations for the healthcare organization, answer Yes for this review question. Does the poster display one strategic goal for the healthcare organization which is a broad and bold one for the organization as a whole, but doable? Does the poster display a rank order of the eleven (11) combined Healthcare Leadership Alliance (HLA) and American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) competencies listed in the course where 1 is the most important and 11 is the least important? Does the poster display the name of two real journals (and the url for the journal or publication) which a healthcare administrator could use to find evidence for the evidence-based practice of healthcare administration? Does the poster display the name of an administrative/management framework (or combination of frameworks) which a healthcare administrator could use? If the author/presenter describes a personally developed framework, is it described it in a sentence or two? Does the poster display the name of one real healthcare administration-related professional association (and the url for the association) which a healthcare administrator for this healthcare organization might join? Does the poster display whether the governance structure of the healthcare organization is shared or not-shared and display a brief description of the governance relationship between the administrative part of the organization and the professional clinical part of the organization in a few sentences which concisely and clearly summarize a reasonable governance structure? Does the poster display a business structure for the healthcare organization and the valid name and web address (url) of the state agency in the chosen state with which the organization must file legal business structure documents (e.g., Department of State)? Does the poster display a tax status for the healthcare organization and the valid name and web address (url) of the state agency in the chosen state with which the organization must file legal tax documents (e.g., Department of Treasury)? Does the poster display the healthcare organization's mission statement and vision statement in no more than a few sentences which concisely and clearly state a reasonable mission and vision for the organization? Does the poster display whether the healthcare organization has a Board of Directors/Trustees? If the organization has a Board of Directors/Trustees, does the poster display a description of the general characteristics of Board members? If the organization does not have a Board of Directors/Trustees, does the poster display a description of how the oversight and expertise generally accomplished by a Board of Directors/Trustees is achieved in the healthcare organization? Do these descriptions concisely and clearly summarize reasonable characteristics for Board members or a reasonable alternate oversight mechanism in a few sentences? Is the electronic poster one slide (e.g., one PowerPoint slide)? Is the page size (page setup) of the slide 48 inches (width) by 36 inches (height); landscape orientation? The standard page size of a PowerPoint slide is 10 inches (width) by 7.5 inches height); landscape orientation. Note: If you open the pdf file and view it in "Actual Size", the size of the poster will be displayed in the lower left corner of the pdf frame and should display 48.00 x 36.00 in. Does the poster design layout have sufficient space between the content (i.e., text, graphics, images); that is, is there sufficient “white space” so the poster does not appear cluttered? Is there a border (white space) around the edge of the poster which serves as a frame for the poster content; that is, content does not continue to the very edge of the slide/poster? Is one font-type is used for the entire poster and is the font-type chosen easily readable and not distracting from the content? Common choices for a poster font-type include: Arial, Book Antigua, Bookman Old Style, Calibri, Cambria, Garamond, Helvetica, and Times New Roman. Is the font-size for the different content sections/types of the poster different while the font-size for a specific content section/type is the same across the entire poster? The recommended range of font-size for the different content sections/types is: poster title = 55 points to 60 points; poster author name = 50 points to 54 points; poster headings = 32 points to 48 points; poster sub-headings = 20 points to 31 points; main body text/narrative = 18 points to 36 points; graphic/image captions = 16 points to 18 points Does the poster format only uses graphics/images in support of the poster content; the reason for any graphics/images and their interpretation are clear to the poster viewer/reader? Note: If no graphics/images are used, answer Yes. Is the poster title is less than 15 words and provides the poster viewer/reader a clear understanding of the poster's focus? Is a name for the poster presenter/developer shown below the poster title? Note: The name shown does not have to be your name. It just needs to be a name. In the example poster, the name of the presenter/developer is I.M. Incharge. You can use the same name if you wish. Poster Presentation Elevator Speech Usually a poster is displayed in conjunction with an oral presentation or speech by the poster developer/author. Such an oral presentation/speech is not used in this course, but it is worthwhile to look at the characteristics of such an oral presentation/speech. At its core, the poster illustrates and reinforces the oral presentation/speech and vice versa. One common characteristic is what is known as the "elevator speech" or "elevator pitch". This speech/pitch is a short verbal/oral description of the poster content/concept (or a company, idea, research, etc.) which: " explains the concept in a way such that any listener can understand it in a short period of time ... The goal is simply to convey the overall concept or topic in an exciting way ... The name—elevator pitch—reflects the idea that it should be possible to deliver the summary in the time span of an elevator ride, or approximately thirty seconds to two minutes. " (Website Source of Quote) The elevator speech/pitch begins the oral presentation/speech about the poster content. Below are some resources which are helpful in crafting the elevator speech/pitch: Win the Business with this Elevator Pitch How to Craft a Successful Elevator Pitch Tips for Developing a Nonprofit "Elevator Pitch" for Your Board Members 6 tips for putting together the perfect elevator pitch

Note [FUN]: The video for Topic 3 - The Perfect Elevator Pitch - is a YouTube video produced by the Rice Business Plan Competition (RBPC) discussing what works and what does not work in an elevator speech/pitch.


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