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Autism, 2.03 (V) What are Indicators of ASD in Infants and Toddlers?

In this lesson, we will identify the characteristics of infant and toddler development, and some of the red flags for autism spectrum disorders to watch for. We will also compare and contrast behaviors of typically developing children with those of children on the autism spectrum in a short video segment. Research has indicated that there is a significantly increased risk of a younger sibling developing or showing signs of autism if they have an older sibling who's been diagnosed on the autism spectrum. Studying the younger siblings of children with autism has given us a substantial amount of information about the early signs and indicators. Some of the red flags indicated in infant development include no big smile or other warm, joyful expression by six months of age or thereafter. No back and forth sharing of sounds, smiles, or other facial expressions by nine months of age or thereafter. No babbling by 12 months of age. No use of back and forth gestures, such as pointing, showing, reaching, or waving. No words by 18 months of age, and no two-word meaningful by the 24 month age. And any noted loss of speech, babbling, or social interaction are a red flag for autism. There are also several red flags during toddler development, a lack or delay in spoken language is often the first sign and symptom recognized during this period of development. There may also be a limited use of gestures or pointing to reference objects. There may be limited pretend play, or inappropriate play with objects such as lining things up or engaging in repetitive patterns of behavior with toys and objects. There may be a limited interest in other children and a limited sharing of enjoyment or emotional reciprocity. You may see sensory avoidant behaviors, such as a refusal to wear shoes, or clothing, or eat certain foods. And while tantrums are common in the toddler years, there may be extreme tantrums where the child is simply inconsolable. In the following video segment, you will see two toddlers. One who is typically developing, and one who was soon after this segment, diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. As you observe the videos, pay particular attention to social engagement and how each child interacts with both objects and people. » [LAUGH] [SOUND] » Look at you running, good running. Come on, keep running. » [SOUND] Oh! [NOISE] Yeah! What's that? What's that? » Doggie. Roof, roof. [NOISE] Ruff, ruff. [NOISE] » Ruff, ruff » Ruff, ruff, ruff. [NOISE] » Ashes, ashes. They all fall down. Ethan, look at Mommy. Look at Mommy, Ethan, look at Mommy! » Whee, eeh, eeh, eeh. » You made a big mess over there with all your stories, huh?



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In this lesson, we will identify the characteristics of infant and toddler development, and some of the red flags for autism spectrum disorders to watch for. We will also compare and contrast behaviors of typically developing children with those of children on the autism spectrum in a short video segment. Research has indicated that there is a significantly increased risk of a younger sibling developing or showing signs of autism if they have an older sibling who's been diagnosed on the autism spectrum. Studying the younger siblings of children with autism has given us a substantial amount of information about the early signs and indicators. Some of the red flags indicated in infant development include no big smile or other warm, joyful expression by six months of age or thereafter. No back and forth sharing of sounds, smiles, or other facial expressions by nine months of age or thereafter. No babbling by 12 months of age. No use of back and forth gestures, such as pointing, showing, reaching, or waving. No words by 18 months of age, and no two-word meaningful by the 24 month age. And any noted loss of speech, babbling, or social interaction are a red flag for autism. There are also several red flags during toddler development, a lack or delay in spoken language is often the first sign and symptom recognized during this period of development. There may also be a limited use of gestures or pointing to reference objects. There may be limited pretend play, or inappropriate play with objects such as lining things up or engaging in repetitive patterns of behavior with toys and objects. There may be a limited interest in other children and a limited sharing of enjoyment or emotional reciprocity. You may see sensory avoidant behaviors, such as a refusal to wear shoes, or clothing, or eat certain foods. And while tantrums are common in the toddler years, there may be extreme tantrums where the child is simply inconsolable. In the following video segment, you will see two toddlers. One who is typically developing, and one who was soon after this segment, diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. As you observe the videos, pay particular attention to social engagement and how each child interacts with both objects and people. » [LAUGH] [SOUND] » Look at you running, good running. Come on, keep running. » [SOUND] Oh! [NOISE] Yeah! What's that? What's that? » Doggie. Roof, roof. [NOISE] Ruff, ruff. [NOISE] » Ruff, ruff » Ruff, ruff, ruff. [NOISE] » Ashes, ashes. They all fall down. Ethan, look at Mommy. Look at Mommy, Ethan, look at Mommy! » Whee, eeh, eeh, eeh. » You made a big mess over there with all your stories, huh?


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