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Autism, 1.05 (V) How to Qualify for Special Education Services

In this lesson, you will learn about how students may qualify for and receive special education services through the public education system. And you'll learn the differences between the process of being medically diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder and the process used for determining a student's eligibility and need for special education services. An individual with autism may also qualify for and receive special education services through the public education system. But there are distinct differences between the process in making a medical diagnosis and the process done for determining special education services. It's also important to note that not all school aged children with autism require special education. Those with a level one diagnosis may be able to access the general education curriculum with minimal supports or with accommodations only. Autism is one of 13 qualifying disabilities outlined in the Individuals Disability Education Act. In the code of federal regulations, autism is described as a developmental disability significantly affecting verbal and non-verbal communication and social interaction generally evident prior to the age of three that adversely affects the child's educational performance. Other characteristics often associated with autism are engagement in repetitive activities and stereotype movements, resistance to environmental change or change in daily routine, and unusual responses to sensory experiences. The term does not apply if the child's educational performance is adversely affected, primarily because the child has an emotional disturbance. It's important to note that educational performance does not only mean academic performance. The child could have difficulties in the areas of development, academic, behavioral and/or social domains. An assessment for special education services can take place at any point in time. Often children transitioning at the age of three from early intervention services will be evaluated in order to determine their ongoing eligibility for special education. But a referral can be made to asses for special education at any point in development. And even if a child doesn't qualify in the early elementary years, there may be a need for ongoing evaluation and additional assessment later in the child's educational development. As the social and academic challenges increase, there may also be an increased need for additional supports and services.



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In this lesson, you will learn about how students may qualify for and receive special education services through the public education system. And you'll learn the differences between the process of being medically diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder and the process used for determining a student's eligibility and need for special education services. An individual with autism may also qualify for and receive special education services through the public education system. But there are distinct differences between the process in making a medical diagnosis and the process done for determining special education services. It's also important to note that not all school aged children with autism require special education. Those with a level one diagnosis may be able to access the general education curriculum with minimal supports or with accommodations only. Autism is one of 13 qualifying disabilities outlined in the Individuals Disability Education Act. In the code of federal regulations, autism is described as a developmental disability significantly affecting verbal and non-verbal communication and social interaction generally evident prior to the age of three that adversely affects the child's educational performance. Other characteristics often associated with autism are engagement in repetitive activities and stereotype movements, resistance to environmental change or change in daily routine, and unusual responses to sensory experiences. The term does not apply if the child's educational performance is adversely affected, primarily because the child has an emotional disturbance. It's important to note that educational performance does not only mean academic performance. The child could have difficulties in the areas of development, academic, behavioral and/or social domains. An assessment for special education services can take place at any point in time. Often children transitioning at the age of three from early intervention services will be evaluated in order to determine their ongoing eligibility for special education. But a referral can be made to asses for special education at any point in development. And even if a child doesn't qualify in the early elementary years, there may be a need for ongoing evaluation and additional assessment later in the child's educational development. As the social and academic challenges increase, there may also be an increased need for additional supports and services.


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