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ADHD, 3.02 (V) Why Use aDaily Report Card (DRC)?

In this module, we're going to talk about a school-based intervention for children with ADHD, the Daily Report Card. Just to give you a quick overview, we're going to talk about what a Daily Report Card is? How to put it together? Construct it including the targets and the criteria for meeting the targets. And then finally, we'll talk about how to effectively provide consequences for a child who's met the goals that are set. So in Part One, we're going to talk about why Daily Report Cards can be useful in schools? Daily report cards are very straight forward. All it is is a set of operationalized goals that the child's expected to meet each day. In part, these are things like be nice or behave or finished work. They are specific. So we'll say things like, completed math assigned within the time given at 80% accuracy or better or had no more than three instances of teasing during lunchtime. It's really important that these criteria are specific and straightforward, so that the child, the teacher and the parent, all can view the behavior and know whether or not the child met the goal or not. Another advantage of the daily report cards, it provides immediate feedback. Because it is a list of goals as the child progresses throughout the day, the teacher or other adults in the school can let the child know how they're doing with regard to meeting them. The other report card goes home every day, so it's a communication tool. One of the saddest things about working in schools with kids with ADHD is sometimes a whole marking period might go by, the parent gets a report card that has a number of bad grades on it or teacher concerns. And the parent will say, well, I would have done something about this had I know this was going on. Because a daily report card goes home each day, there's an opportunity for parents to be informed all along the way. They can put out small fires as opposed to dealing with a big one later on in the marking period. Finally, because the daily report card has home-based privileges that are based on how the child did on the goals each day, there's some accountability built-in where the child now is responsible at home for what happened during the school day. The other report cards are evidence-based. There are a number of studies that now show that they're effective in improving the performance in school of children with ADHD, it's cost-effective. The daily report card only costs the paper it's printed on. It's a very cheap intervention that can be maintained over the long run, which is important for kids with ADHD. Finally, it's a positive took. Students receive immediate feedback on meeting their goals throughout the day and this is an opportunity for adults, parents and teachers to give an, atta boy or atta girl, or let the child know, hey, you did something well today. Here's, let's go over all these positives and help to increase the child's motivation as he or she proceeds throughout the school week. We're going to talk in a minute about the components of the daily report cards. There's a stepwise procedure for making one. First, you select areas in need of improvement. You define the goals, you decide on the criteria for those definitions of the goals. How many instances out of your seat might be allowed or how many times you expect the child to contribute to a class discussion? How much work is expected to be completed within a certain amount of time given? You have to explain the daily report card to the child, how it's going to work, what the goals are? And what consequences? Are going to be linked to those goals? The parents have to establish those consequences at home, privileges or rewards. And then on an ongoing basis, the parent and teacher and perhaps the school counselor or psychologist monitors and modifies the program to make sure it continues to work and work well.



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In this module, we're going to talk about a school-based intervention for children with ADHD, the Daily Report Card. Just to give you a quick overview, we're going to talk about what a Daily Report Card is? How to put it together? Construct it including the targets and the criteria for meeting the targets. And then finally, we'll talk about how to effectively provide consequences for a child who's met the goals that are set. So in Part One, we're going to talk about why Daily Report Cards can be useful in schools? Daily report cards are very straight forward. All it is is a set of operationalized goals that the child's expected to meet each day. In part, these are things like be nice or behave or finished work. They are specific. So we'll say things like, completed math assigned within the time given at 80% accuracy or better or had no more than three instances of teasing during lunchtime. It's really important that these criteria are specific and straightforward, so that the child, the teacher and the parent, all can view the behavior and know whether or not the child met the goal or not. Another advantage of the daily report cards, it provides immediate feedback. Because it is a list of goals as the child progresses throughout the day, the teacher or other adults in the school can let the child know how they're doing with regard to meeting them. The other report card goes home every day, so it's a communication tool. One of the saddest things about working in schools with kids with ADHD is sometimes a whole marking period might go by, the parent gets a report card that has a number of bad grades on it or teacher concerns. And the parent will say, well, I would have done something about this had I know this was going on. Because a daily report card goes home each day, there's an opportunity for parents to be informed all along the way. They can put out small fires as opposed to dealing with a big one later on in the marking period. Finally, because the daily report card has home-based privileges that are based on how the child did on the goals each day, there's some accountability built-in where the child now is responsible at home for what happened during the school day. The other report cards are evidence-based. There are a number of studies that now show that they're effective in improving the performance in school of children with ADHD, it's cost-effective. The daily report card only costs the paper it's printed on. It's a very cheap intervention that can be maintained over the long run, which is important for kids with ADHD. Finally, it's a positive took. Students receive immediate feedback on meeting their goals throughout the day and this is an opportunity for adults, parents and teachers to give an, atta boy or atta girl, or let the child know, hey, you did something well today. Here's, let's go over all these positives and help to increase the child's motivation as he or she proceeds throughout the school week. We're going to talk in a minute about the components of the daily report cards. There's a stepwise procedure for making one. First, you select areas in need of improvement. You define the goals, you decide on the criteria for those definitions of the goals. How many instances out of your seat might be allowed or how many times you expect the child to contribute to a class discussion? How much work is expected to be completed within a certain amount of time given? You have to explain the daily report card to the child, how it's going to work, what the goals are? And what consequences? Are going to be linked to those goals? The parents have to establish those consequences at home, privileges or rewards. And then on an ongoing basis, the parent and teacher and perhaps the school counselor or psychologist monitors and modifies the program to make sure it continues to work and work well.


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