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Tony Robbins Podcast, The #1 Secret to Productivity | Tony Robbins Podcast

[Music]

hey it's Tony Robbins welcome to the

podcast listen today we're gonna talk

about a power that most people really

don't take full advantage of in fact

they let it take advantage of them and

that's the power of habit you know so

often people all talk to me and say God

you have such incredible willpower and I

believe I do I believe we all have

willpower but there's a limit to

willpower I always tell people if you're

making decisions if you're trying to

make everything in your life work by

willpower alone you're just gonna be

exhausted what you really have to learn

is how to condition your mind and body

and emotions you really have to learn

how to tap into the power of habits in

fact you know one of my favorite quotes

says excellence is an art one by

training and habituation we do not act

rightly because we have virtue or

excellence but rather we have those

because we've acted rightly we are what

we repeatedly do excellence then is not

an act but a habit that comes from

Aristotle more than 2,000 years ago and

it couldn't be more true today so how do

you create the habits they're gonna make

you successful in life and in business

the habits are gonna make you feel more

enjoyment in your life and the habits

are gonna make you financially free well

you have to understand the power of

habit and put it to work for you and who

better to do it than Charles Duhigg he's

the Pulitzer Prize winning reporter from

the New York Times and he's the author

of the New York Times best-selling book

the power of habit he's gonna show you

how to do it smarter faster and better

so here's Anna and here's your podcast

enjoy

why do habits exist

how can they be changed and how can they

transform our lives and our businesses

consider the marketing team at Procter &

Gamble P&G had developed a colourless

cheap to manufacture liquid that could

be sprayed on any stench to make it

odorless they pitched the product to the

public as a quick and easy way to

eliminate any scent on any surface smoke

on clothes

rancid pet smells dirty cars but sales

flopped why the team went back to the

drawing board relentlessly poring over

consumer psychology employing a Harvard

Business School professor to analyze

their campaigns what they eventually

discovered was that if they added a

perfume to the formula so that instead

of merely neutralizing odors the spray

had its own distinct scent they created

a new incentive for the consumer and so

for breeze which had originally been

conceived as a revolutionary way to

destroy odors became an air freshener

used once things were already clean

within two months of the new marketing

model sales doubled and a year later the

products brought in 230 million this is

the power of habit and just one of the

many examples that Pulitzer

prize-winning reporter for the New York

Times

Charles Duhigg gives in his best-selling

book the power of habit Duhigg operates

on the premise that the key to

exercising regularly losing weight

raising exceptional children becoming

more productive building revolutionary

companies and social movements and

achieving success is understanding how

habits work and in his book he delves

into why some people and companies

struggle to change despite years of

trying while others seem to be able to

remake themselves overnight he visits

laboratories where neuroscientists

explore how habits work and where

exactly they reside in our brains and he

reveals how the right habits were

crucial to the success of Procter &

Gamble Target super stores NFL teams and

even some of the nation's largest

hospitals here to speak more about how

harnessing the power of habits can

transform our businesses our communities

and our lives is author of the power of

habit and the recently released smarter

better faster Charles Duhigg Charles

thanks so much for joining us thanks for

having me I really appreciate it

all right so tell us how did you first

decide to study habits and the role they

play in our everyday lives well this

started when I was a when I was a junior

reporter my first real reporting gig was

I just graduated from business school

and I got a job with the Los Angeles

Times and they sent me to Iraq and it

literally as soon as I got off the plane

in Iraq I pretty much realized that I

had just made a terrible terrible

mistake by by volunteering to go to Iraq

and cover a warzone and so I was trying

to figure out what I could cover in an

Iraq that would not put me in dangerous

situations and I heard about this army

major that was doing an experiment in a

city named Kufa which is about an hour

south of Baghdad and so I went down to

Kufa and I met with US Army Major and

this guy had been sent about nine months

earlier to Kufa with the orbiters of

stopping riots from happening and if

you'll remember at this point this is

like 2003 2004 there's a there's a lot

of riots going on because the Americans

had just come into Iraq you know the

whole country is kind of like a very

chaotic and turbulence and this major

when he got to the city of Kufa he went

to the mayor of the city and he said

look I have a whole list of things I'd

like you to do to help me stop the riots

like can you stop the Gun Runners and

the suicide bombers and the mayor was

like look man if you can tell me how to

do that stuff I will totally do it but I

have no idea how to make that happen and

so at the bottom of the list of the

requests that this Army Major had was

can you take all the food vendors out of

the plazas and in the mayor's like sure

absolutely I can take the food vendors

out of the plazas that one we can make

happen so a couple weeks later there's

um there's a crowd that starts gathering

around the Grand Mosque of Kufa which is

is this place where a lot of riots that

happened previously then and the thing

that they never tell you on the news

about riots is that it actually takes

like five or six hours for riots and

develop so what happens is that a bunch

of troublemakers will show up and then

some spectators will come to watch those

troublemakers and then more spectators

and more spectators and more spectators

and eventually the crowd gets to like

this certain size that it's it's riot

ready and if someone throws a bottle at

that point a riot will erupt but it's

all about getting that that crowd big

enough so so the main the major Army

Major is telling me this story and he he

pulls out some footage from

drones it was shot of this this plaza

around to the Grand Mosque of Kufa where

a crowd had started developing this is a

couple of weeks after he had talked to

the mayor in and sure enough you sort of

see these troublemakers show up and then

some spectators show up to watch the

troublemakers and then more spectators

will have to watch the spectators and

the crowd gets bigger and bigger and

bigger and you know four or five hours

go by and and it's about 5:30 at night

it's exactly the right time of day four

or the the crowd is exactly at the right

size for basically a riot to happen in

in it's at 5:30 in the afternoon which

is you know kind of like getting getting

towards the end of the day and as you

watch the drone footage of this crowd at

the periphery of the crowd there's all

these people like it like spectators

just at the edges they all start looking

around all the sudden and the major was

telling me he was like look they're

looking for the kebab sellers because

it's dinnertime and they're hungry and

normally there's these kebab sellers in

the plaza but I had asked the mayor to

remove all the food vendors so there's

no one for them to buy dinner from so

all those people at the periphery of the

crowd they just start like wandering

away and in fact some of the drones

actually followed them to see where they

were going and they actually went home

assumably to have dinner and then

there's another ring of spectators right

and they're watching these people leave

the plaza and assumably they think to

themselves like oh there must be a

better riot going on someplace else I'm

gonna follow those guys and see where

they're going so they leave - and in 45

minutes

the entire plaza clears out except for

the troublemakers and the troublemakers

don't have an audience anymore so they

go home - and in the nine months since

the Army Major had gotten there there

hadn't been one riot but I was asking

like how did you know this is work how

did you know that removing the food

vendors would stop riots and the guy the

the the major himself was like look I

didn't know for certain that was gonna

work right I I tried all types of

different things but he said that when

he joined the army that the number one

thing you learned from the military is

that the the the military exists as a

giant habit change machine and in fact

this is true a lot of what we know about

habit formation and the neurology and

science of habit formation comes

originally from military studies because

when you your natural habit

to run away from someone shooting at you

but the military has to teach you a

habit of like shooting back or nowadays

if you're in a war zone you can email

your spouse every night so if they don't

teach you good communication habits you

get into a fight over email and then

you're distracted when you're on patrol

and so he said that when he joined the

military they taught him to start seeing

the world in terms of habits and in

particular to see the world in terms of

cues and routines and rewards which is

how habits work and that once you start

seeing the world in terms of these

habits and how they function and the

mechanics of them it's like someone

gives you a pair of glasses and suddenly

everything looks different including a

crowd of Iraqis that might riot

so when I came back to the US I thought

that was just completely fascinating and

I started researching what we know about

habit formation wow that's such a good

story as we were talking I was thinking

is this the part of habit or the power

of food so and I never knew that - that

it originally comes from from the

military I mean it makes sense right if

that's if that's a habit that they're

trying to they're trying to basically

teach you to go against your your inner

psychology yeah yeah so I know you kind

of touched upon the habit loop can you

give our audience a better idea of how

that works sure absolutely and and this

just like the core insight right we are

living right now through the Golden Age

of understanding the neurology of habit

formation and the single biggest insight

is that every single habit and in about

40 to 45 percent of what we do every day

is a habit right this is studies have

shown that that many of the things that



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[Music]

hey it's Tony Robbins welcome to the

podcast listen today we're gonna talk

about a power that most people really

don't take full advantage of in fact

they let it take advantage of them and

that's the power of habit you know so

often people all talk to me and say God

you have such incredible willpower and I

believe I do I believe we all have

willpower but there's a limit to

willpower I always tell people if you're

making decisions if you're trying to

make everything in your life work by

willpower alone you're just gonna be

exhausted what you really have to learn

is how to condition your mind and body

and emotions you really have to learn

how to tap into the power of habits in

fact you know one of my favorite quotes

says excellence is an art one by

training and habituation we do not act

rightly because we have virtue or

excellence but rather we have those

because we've acted rightly we are what

we repeatedly do excellence then is not

an act but a habit that comes from

Aristotle more than 2,000 years ago and

it couldn't be more true today so how do

you create the habits they're gonna make

you successful in life and in business

the habits are gonna make you feel more

enjoyment in your life and the habits

are gonna make you financially free well

you have to understand the power of

habit and put it to work for you and who

better to do it than Charles Duhigg he's

the Pulitzer Prize winning reporter from

the New York Times and he's the author

of the New York Times best-selling book

the power of habit he's gonna show you

how to do it smarter faster and better

so here's Anna and here's your podcast

enjoy

why do habits exist

how can they be changed and how can they

transform our lives and our businesses

consider the marketing team at Procter &

Gamble P&G had developed a colourless

cheap to manufacture liquid that could

be sprayed on any stench to make it

odorless they pitched the product to the

public as a quick and easy way to

eliminate any scent on any surface smoke

on clothes

rancid pet smells dirty cars but sales

flopped why the team went back to the

drawing board relentlessly poring over

consumer psychology employing a Harvard

Business School professor to analyze

their campaigns what they eventually

discovered was that if they added a

perfume to the formula so that instead

of merely neutralizing odors the spray

had its own distinct scent they created

a new incentive for the consumer and so

for breeze which had originally been

conceived as a revolutionary way to

destroy odors became an air freshener

used once things were already clean

within two months of the new marketing

model sales doubled and a year later the

products brought in 230 million this is

the power of habit and just one of the

many examples that Pulitzer

prize-winning reporter for the New York

Times

Charles Duhigg gives in his best-selling

book the power of habit Duhigg operates

on the premise that the key to

exercising regularly losing weight

raising exceptional children becoming

more productive building revolutionary

companies and social movements and

achieving success is understanding how

habits work and in his book he delves

into why some people and companies

struggle to change despite years of

trying while others seem to be able to

remake themselves overnight he visits

laboratories where neuroscientists

explore how habits work and where

exactly they reside in our brains and he

reveals how the right habits were

crucial to the success of Procter &

Gamble Target super stores NFL teams and

even some of the nation's largest

hospitals here to speak more about how

harnessing the power of habits can

transform our businesses our communities

and our lives is author of the power of

habit and the recently released smarter

better faster Charles Duhigg Charles

thanks so much for joining us thanks for

having me I really appreciate it

all right so tell us how did you first

decide to study habits and the role they

play in our everyday lives well this

started when I was a when I was a junior

reporter my first real reporting gig was

I just graduated from business school

and I got a job with the Los Angeles

Times and they sent me to Iraq and it

literally as soon as I got off the plane

in Iraq I pretty much realized that I

had just made a terrible terrible

mistake by by volunteering to go to Iraq

and cover a warzone and so I was trying

to figure out what I could cover in an

Iraq that would not put me in dangerous

situations and I heard about this army

major that was doing an experiment in a

city named Kufa which is about an hour

south of Baghdad and so I went down to

Kufa and I met with US Army Major and

this guy had been sent about nine months

earlier to Kufa with the orbiters of

stopping riots from happening and if

you'll remember at this point this is

like 2003 2004 there's a there's a lot

of riots going on because the Americans

had just come into Iraq you know the

whole country is kind of like a very

chaotic and turbulence and this major

when he got to the city of Kufa he went

to the mayor of the city and he said

look I have a whole list of things I'd

like you to do to help me stop the riots

like can you stop the Gun Runners and

the suicide bombers and the mayor was

like look man if you can tell me how to

do that stuff I will totally do it but I

have no idea how to make that happen and

so at the bottom of the list of the

requests that this Army Major had was

can you take all the food vendors out of

the plazas and in the mayor's like sure

absolutely I can take the food vendors

out of the plazas that one we can make

happen so a couple weeks later there's

um there's a crowd that starts gathering

around the Grand Mosque of Kufa which is

is this place where a lot of riots that

happened previously then and the thing

that they never tell you on the news

about riots is that it actually takes

like five or six hours for riots and

develop so what happens is that a bunch

of troublemakers will show up and then

some spectators will come to watch those

troublemakers and then more spectators

and more spectators and more spectators

and eventually the crowd gets to like

this certain size that it's it's riot

ready and if someone throws a bottle at

that point a riot will erupt but it's

all about getting that that crowd big

enough so so the main the major Army

Major is telling me this story and he he

pulls out some footage from

drones it was shot of this this plaza

around to the Grand Mosque of Kufa where

a crowd had started developing this is a

couple of weeks after he had talked to

the mayor in and sure enough you sort of

see these troublemakers show up and then

some spectators show up to watch the

troublemakers and then more spectators

will have to watch the spectators and

the crowd gets bigger and bigger and

bigger and you know four or five hours

go by and and it's about 5:30 at night

it's exactly the right time of day four

or the the crowd is exactly at the right

size for basically a riot to happen in

in it's at 5:30 in the afternoon which

is you know kind of like getting getting

towards the end of the day and as you

watch the drone footage of this crowd at

the periphery of the crowd there's all

these people like it like spectators

just at the edges they all start looking

around all the sudden and the major was

telling me he was like look they're

looking for the kebab sellers because

it's dinnertime and they're hungry and

normally there's these kebab sellers in

the plaza but I had asked the mayor to

remove all the food vendors so there's

no one for them to buy dinner from so

all those people at the periphery of the

crowd they just start like wandering

away and in fact some of the drones

actually followed them to see where they

were going and they actually went home

assumably to have dinner and then

there's another ring of spectators right

and they're watching these people leave

the plaza and assumably they think to

themselves like oh there must be a

better riot going on someplace else I'm

gonna follow those guys and see where

they're going so they leave - and in 45

minutes

the entire plaza clears out except for

the troublemakers and the troublemakers

don't have an audience anymore so they

go home - and in the nine months since

the Army Major had gotten there there

hadn't been one riot but I was asking

like how did you know this is work how

did you know that removing the food

vendors would stop riots and the guy the

the the major himself was like look I

didn't know for certain that was gonna

work right I I tried all types of

different things but he said that when

he joined the army that the number one

thing you learned from the military is

that the the the military exists as a

giant habit change machine and in fact

this is true a lot of what we know about

habit formation and the neurology and

science of habit formation comes

originally from military studies because

when you your natural habit

to run away from someone shooting at you

but the military has to teach you a

habit of like shooting back or nowadays

if you're in a war zone you can email

your spouse every night so if they don't

teach you good communication habits you

get into a fight over email and then

you're distracted when you're on patrol

and so he said that when he joined the

military they taught him to start seeing

the world in terms of habits and in

particular to see the world in terms of

cues and routines and rewards which is

how habits work and that once you start

seeing the world in terms of these

habits and how they function and the

mechanics of them it's like someone

gives you a pair of glasses and suddenly

everything looks different including a

crowd of Iraqis that might riot

so when I came back to the US I thought

that was just completely fascinating and

I started researching what we know about

habit formation wow that's such a good

story as we were talking I was thinking

is this the part of habit or the power

of food so and I never knew that - that

it originally comes from from the

military I mean it makes sense right if

that's if that's a habit that they're

trying to they're trying to basically

teach you to go against your your inner

psychology yeah yeah so I know you kind

of touched upon the habit loop can you

give our audience a better idea of how

that works sure absolutely and and this

just like the core insight right we are

living right now through the Golden Age

of understanding the neurology of habit

formation and the single biggest insight

is that every single habit and in about

40 to 45 percent of what we do every day

is a habit right this is studies have

shown that that many of the things that


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