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Voice of America, Parents Want Genetic Test for Disease to Choose Baby's Gender

Parents Want Genetic Test for Disease to Choose Baby's Gender

The quest to identify fetuses carrying potentially fatal genetic diseases got a powerful tool in the early 1990s, with the development of Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis.

PGD, as it's known, allows doctors to scan the cells of an embryo fertilized outside the womb for signs of inherited diseases like cystic fibrosis or sickle-cell anemia, giving parents the option of not implanting that embryo. In some fertility clinics, PGD is increasingly being used only to determine the embryos' sex, and then just boys, or girls, are allowed to develop into babies. Immigrant couples are making different choices for children than American-born couples.

In the operating room at the Huntington Reproductive Center in Southern California, reproductive specialist Dr. Daniel Potter sits in front of a 32-years old woman, he is exacting her eggs to be fertilized outside her body, although she is completely capable of getting pregnant naturally. She's asked him to analyze the chromosomes of her embryos and select only the male's. "Virtually 100% of those pregnancies will be the desired gender," Dr. Potter says. Many doctors, medical ethicists and even human rights activists say Daniel Potter should not be doing this invasive, risky procedure for a woman and her baby who have no medical need for it. The American Society of Reproductive Medicine supports PGD when needed to prevent passing on a genetic disease, but opposes it for gender selection.

Potter, however, says he's just fulfilling his patients' reproductive rights, explaining, "It's presumptuous of any organization to assert that a woman should or shouldn't be able to determine the number of children she wants to have, or the gender of these children. " "I don't see this as an issue of reproductive rights. Medicine has to say what it stands for. If it's all about health and disease, then gender is neither." Dr. Caplan directs the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, where he investigates the ethical issues of reproductive technologies. He's concerned about the expectations parents will have for their gender-selected children. "If you spent $30,000 to get a boy to roughhouse and play sports with, and have a boy who is indifferent to sports, are you going to feel disappointed? Or are you going to feel shortchanged?" he wonders.

Other ethicists worry that using PGD to guarantee a boy - or a girl - reinforces gender stereotypes. Sujatha Jesudason, program director at the Center for Genetics and Society in Oakland, California, goes even further. She says sex selection is sex discrimination. "When we say sex selection is okay, we are saying that it is okay to choose only certain types of children. When you have a father who says, 'I want a son to pass on the family business,' he thinks a girl can't do that." Jesudason, who was born in India, is especially sensitive about her culture's preference for boys. "There is a whole tone in the culture that says, girls are just not as desirable. " In an exam room, Dr. Potter greets a couple originally from India, who now live in Canada and have come to his clinic to have a boy. "When a daughter marries, she joins the other family. Girls get married and they move out," the woman explains. "With a boy, they will stay with us and carry on the family." This south Asian women and her husband care for his parents at their home. Her parents are cared for in her brother's home. Although they have two daughters, her husband says there'll be no one to take care of them until they have a son - yet to be born. "The sons will usually take care of the parents in old age. I think our new coming generation will do for us, too. " 25 percent of Potter's gender selection patients are foreign-born, and of those from India, Korea and China, 90 percent want boys. That adds up to six boys a month in his clinic alone. Of his American-born patients, 80 percent ask for girls. And, Potter says, they tell him why: "It's about the woman desiring to have the relationship that she had with her mother - seeing their daughter walk down the aisle, going shopping with them. A potential daughter occupies a space in their consciousness like a living, human being. And for them to give up on that, it's like a death. " Whether parents want a boy or girl because of gender stereotypes, ethnic traditions, or simply because they have one sex and want the other - it's the intensity of that desire that's motivated doctors in many PGD clinics to take it from a procedure designed to detect genetic defects, to one that detects - and selects - gender.


Parents Want Genetic Test for Disease to Choose Baby's Gender

The quest to identify fetuses carrying potentially fatal genetic diseases got a powerful tool in the early 1990s, with the development of Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis. 致命的となる可能性のある遺伝病を抱える胎児を特定するための探求は、着床前遺伝子診断の開発により、1990年代初頭に強力なツールとなりました。

PGD, as it's known, allows doctors to scan the cells of an embryo fertilized outside the womb for signs of inherited diseases like cystic fibrosis or sickle-cell anemia, giving parents the option of not implanting that embryo. PGDは、知られているように、医師が子宮の外で受精した胚の細胞をスキャンして、嚢胞性線維症や鎌状赤血球貧血などの遺伝性疾患の兆候を探すことを可能にし、両親にその胚を移植しないオプションを与えます。 In some fertility clinics, PGD is increasingly being used only to determine the embryos' sex, and then just boys, or girls, are allowed to develop into babies. 一部の不妊治療クリニックでは、PGDは胚の性別を決定するためにのみ使用されることが多くなり、その後、男の子または女の子だけが赤ちゃんに成長することが許可されています。 Immigrant couples are making different choices for children than American-born couples. 移民のカップルは、アメリカ生まれのカップルとは子供のために異なる選択をしています。

In the operating room at the Huntington Reproductive Center in Southern California, reproductive specialist Dr. Daniel Potter sits in front of a 32-years old woman, he is exacting her eggs to be fertilized outside her body, although she is completely capable of getting pregnant naturally. She's asked him to analyze the chromosomes of her embryos and select only the male's. 彼女は彼に彼女の胚の染色体を分析し、男性の染色体だけを選択するように頼んだ。 "Virtually 100% of those pregnancies will be the desired gender," Dr. Potter says. Many doctors, medical ethicists and even human rights activists say Daniel Potter should not be doing this invasive, risky procedure for a woman and her baby who have no medical need for it. The American Society of Reproductive Medicine supports PGD when needed to prevent passing on a genetic disease, but opposes it for gender selection.

Potter, however, says he's just fulfilling his patients' reproductive rights, explaining, "It's presumptuous of any organization to assert that a woman should or shouldn't be able to determine the number of children she wants to have, or the gender of these children. " しかし、ポッター氏は、患者の生殖に関する権利を果たしているだけだと述べ、「女性が希望する子供の数や性別を決定できるべきかどうかを決定できるべきかどうかを主張することは、どの組織にとっても思いがけないことです。子供達。 " "I don't see this as an issue of reproductive rights. 「私はこれを生殖権の問題とは見ていません。 Medicine has to say what it stands for. 医学はそれが何を意味するかを言わなければなりません。 If it's all about health and disease, then gender is neither." 健康と病気がすべてだとすれば、性別もどちらでもありません。」 Dr. Caplan directs the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, where he investigates the ethical issues of reproductive technologies. He's concerned about the expectations parents will have for their gender-selected children. 彼は、両親が性別によって選ばれた子供たちに期待することを心配しています。 "If you spent $30,000 to get a boy to roughhouse and play sports with, and have a boy who is indifferent to sports, are you going to feel disappointed? 「少年をラフハウスに連れて行ってスポーツをするために3万ドルを費やし、スポーツに無関心な少年がいるとしたら、失望するだろうか? Or are you going to feel shortchanged?" それとも、短気な気分になりますか?」 he wonders.

Other ethicists worry that using PGD to guarantee a boy - or a girl - reinforces gender stereotypes. 他の倫理学者は、PGDを使用して男の子(または女の子)を保証することで、性別の固定観念が強化されることを心配しています。 Sujatha Jesudason, program director at the Center for Genetics and Society in Oakland, California, goes even further. She says sex selection is sex discrimination. "When we say sex selection is okay, we are saying that it is okay to choose only certain types of children. When you have a father who says, 'I want a son to pass on the family business,' he thinks a girl can't do that." Jesudason, who was born in India, is especially sensitive about her culture's preference for boys. "There is a whole tone in the culture that says, girls are just not as desirable. " 「文化には、女の子はそれほど望ましくないという全体的なトーンがあります。」 In an exam room, Dr. Potter greets a couple originally from India, who now live in Canada and have come to his clinic to have a boy. "When a daughter marries, she joins the other family. Girls get married and they move out," the woman explains. "With a boy, they will stay with us and carry on the family." This south Asian women and her husband care for his parents at their home. Her parents are cared for in her brother's home. Although they have two daughters, her husband says there'll be no one to take care of them until they have a son - yet to be born. 彼らには2人の娘がいますが、彼女の夫は、彼らが息子をもうけるまで、彼らの世話をする人は誰もいないだろうと言います-まだ生まれていません。 "The sons will usually take care of the parents in old age. I think our new coming generation will do for us, too. " 25 percent of Potter's gender selection patients are foreign-born, and of those from India, Korea and China, 90 percent want boys. ポッターの性別選択患者の25%は外国生まれであり、インド、韓国、中国の患者の90%は男の子を望んでいます。 That adds up to six boys a month in his clinic alone. それは彼のクリニックだけで月に6人の男の子になります。 Of his American-born patients, 80 percent ask for girls. 彼のアメリカ生まれの患者のうち、80パーセントは女の子を求めています。 And, Potter says, they tell him why: "It's about the woman desiring to have the relationship that she had with her mother - seeing their daughter walk down the aisle, going shopping with them. A potential daughter occupies a space in their consciousness like a living, human being. And for them to give up on that, it's like a death. " そして彼らがそれをあきらめるためには、それは死のようなものです。 「」 Whether parents want a boy or girl because of gender stereotypes, ethnic traditions, or simply because they have one sex and want the other - it's the intensity of that desire that's motivated doctors in many PGD clinics to take it from a procedure designed to detect genetic defects, to one that detects - and selects - gender. 両親が性別の固定観念、民族的伝統のために、または単に一方の性別を持ち、もう一方の性別を望んでいるために男の子または女の子を望んでいるかどうか-多くのPGDクリニックの医師が遺伝子を検出するように設計された手順からそれを取るように動機付けられたのはその欲求の強さです欠陥、性別を検出し、選択するものに。